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Glimpse of Nothingness Paperback – 1 May 1999

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Product details

  • Paperback: 192 pages
  • Publisher: St Martin's Press; Reprint edition (1 May 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0312209452
  • ISBN-13: 978-0312209452
  • Product Dimensions: 12.8 x 1.2 x 22.4 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,079,568 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Frank Bierbrauer on 23 July 2011
Format: Paperback
Once again Jan Willem van de Wetering in his humourous style exposes his experiences to the world without embarrassment or shyness. Ten years after his experience as a young man in the Zen monastery in Japan under the old master, even though he had separated from "Peter", the old masters heir to be, on bad terms, he meets him again in Holland and Peter visits him at his home. He decides to continue where he left off with his koan still smoldering inside. He spends some time at Peter's Zen community, or commarde as others called it, and solved his koan as well as others. We learn more of Peter and especially of the fascinating set of characters who are also seeking, such as Edgar or Rupert the erstwhile psychologist. As before, he struggles with the required discipline but this time it's not as hard, he has gained from his stay in Japan; as the old master said at the end of the first book "you are now a little awake, so awake you will never be able to fall asleep again".

The training is everywhere.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By B. on 25 Jan. 2012
Format: Paperback
I love Janwillem's books on his own experience into Zen! But you should read 'The empty mirror' before reading this - not neccesary, but do it! :-)
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30 of 38 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 24 April 2000
Format: Paperback
I first read "A Glimpse of Nothingness" in 1976 and I still have my original hardback copy. I had never heard of Janwillem van der Wetering and it was years before I found a copy of his earlier Zen book, "The Empty Mirror" - twenty years later, in fact! However "A Glimpse of Nothingness" has haunted me for all that time and I have lost count of the number of times I have read it. I know some parts of it almost by heart but, whenever I read it, I still find myself right there in the story with the author, not really sure what is going to happen next. For me this book was, and still is, an absolute delight. In 1976 and the following five years, I was very ill and feeling very lonely, frightened and uncertain. This book, for reasons I am not able to put into words, was an enormous comfort to me and I felt the author to be a friend in some very dark times. When I feel low and spiritually drained these days, I find that certain movies and books give me the encouragement I need, no matter how often I watch or read them. Richard Attenborough's "Ghandi" (especially Ben Kingsley's performance) is one such movie; this is one such book.
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By p. cow on 14 Mar. 2015
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I read The Empty Mirror 25 years ago and was fascinated by the esoteric ideas and settings. Partly inspired by the book, I made my own journey to Japan and lived there for a number of years.
Now many years later and back in my own country I read this account without the same boyish excitement, but with a sense of revisiting familiar themes closer to home. Interesting but not as inspirational - not sure if that is is my fault - probably.
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By J G on 9 Feb. 2015
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
A fascinating glimpse of someone's experiences and journeys in Zen.
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