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New Bell X-1 "Glamorous Glennis" 15 3/4" L Aeroplane Toy Includes Desk Stand

by ACT

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  • Scale:1/32 Length:15.75 Wingspan:13.5
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Product Information

Technical Details
Item Weight3.6 Kg
Product Dimensions50.8 x 38.1 x 38.1 cm
Manufacturer referenceAM150-AR
  
Additional Information
ASINB00EKZIPKI
Shipping Weight1.8 Kg
Delivery Destinations:Visit the Delivery Destinations Help page to see where this item can be delivered.
Date First Available14 Aug 2013
  
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Product Description

New Bell X-1 "Glamorous Glennis" 15 3/4" L Aeroplane Toy Includes Desk Stand
Length: 15 3/4"
Wingspan: 13 1/2"
Scale: 1/32
Includes desk stand.
The Bell X-1, originally designated XS-1, was a joint NACA-U.S. Army Air Forces/US Air Force supersonic research project and the first aircraft to exceed the speed of sound in controlled, level flight. This resulted in the first of the so-called X-planes, an American series of experimental aircraft designated for testing of new technologies and usually kept highly secret.
On 16 March 1945, the United States Army Air Forces' Flight Test Division and the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA) (now NASA) contracted Bell Aircraft to build three XS-1 (for "Experimental, Supersonic", later X-1) aircraft to obtain flight data on conditions in the transonic speed range.
The rocket propulsion system was a four-chamber engine built by Reaction Motors, Inc., one of the first companies to build rocket engines in America. It burned ethyl alcohol diluted with water and liquid oxygen. The thrust could be changed in 1500 lbf increments by firing one or more of the chambers. The fuel and oxygen tanks for the first two X-1 engines were pressurized with nitrogen and the rest with steam-driven turbopumps. The all-important fuel turbopumps, necessary to raise the chamber pressure and thrust, while lightening the engine, were built by Robert Goddard who was under Navy contract to provide jet-assisted takeoff rockets.

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