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Give Up [VINYL] Import


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Music

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Biography

You can spend all the time and money in the world trying to craft the perfect pop-music scenario, but sometimes the stars have to align all by themselves. Even though early on the members of The Postal Service jokingly referred to “Such Great Heights” as “the hit” on their debut album, Give Up, there’s no way anyone could have predicted the eventual impact made by ... Read more in Amazon's The Postal Service Store

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Product details

  • Vinyl
  • Number of Discs: 2
  • Format: Import
  • Label: Import
  • ASIN: B0007V6XS0
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Vinyl  |  MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (34 customer reviews)

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By E. A Solinas HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on 4 Mar 2006
Format: Audio CD
The Postal Service had an unusual start. No, not THAT postal service, but the unique band that turned out the indie-electronic "Give Up."
It's the sort of band story that magazines love: Death Cab For Cutie's Ben Gibbard and Dntel's Jimmy Tamborello exchanged tapes through the mail, sculpting sweet, melancholy trip-hop into this enchanting, low-key pop masterpiece.
It starts off on strong footing with the melancholy, angelic-voiced "District Sleeps Alone Tonight" with its solemn organ opener. The second song is even stronger -- the sparkling, upbeat "Such Great Heights," an adoring love song from a guy to his on-the-road girlfriend. "They will see us waving/from such great heights/come down now!/they'll say/but everything looks perfect from far away..."
With such a great opener, the rest of the album is almost garuanteed to be lackluster. But Gibbard and Tamborello manage to keep the quality up with the delicate "Sleeping In," ethereal "Nothing Better," and the dreamily majestic "Recycled Air" with its backdrop of string-like synth. "Give Up" ends on a slightly darker note with the dark, grittier "This Place is a Prison" and the fast-paced but strange "Brand New Colony," before finishing off with the magnificently cacophonous "Natural Anthem."
"Give Up" was originally recorded in a rather weird way, with Gibbard and Tamborello exchanging packages with recorded CDs inside. Not your typical way of making music, and some might have scoffed at this unorthodox method. But it pays off beautifully -- the melodious poppy sound of Postal Service is absolutely intoxicating. It's a perfect mix of beats, clicks, dreamy synth and sweet vocals.
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14 of 14 people found the following review helpful By A. Mockler on 23 Aug 2006
Format: Audio CD
If you are in any doubt about buying this album do so now. I have only had it two days and it has been on constantly at home, at work and in my car since I got it. Jimmy Tamborello has excelled himself and the tracks are fantastic. Ben Gibbard's vocals enhance the mood of each track perfectly and his lyrics tell some amazing stories. Every track is fantastic with the album starting off on a bouncy happy footing with the last three tracks showing a darker side of this duo. Such great heights and Clark Gable are stand out tracks for me but really its just a stand out album all the way through.

Buy this album, buy it now!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Martin on 1 Jun 2005
Format: Audio CD
Frrsh from having been threatened with a lawsuit byt eh US Postal Service for usign their name (the situationw as resolved when they played at the latter's Christmas do), this album (and its trck We Will Become Silhouettes) has belatedly broken through in the US, finding a gap among the wall-to-wall R&B and hip-hop to offer something genuinely unique among modern popular music. The irony is that the album was only ever a side-project, and with DCFC having recorded and toured since, this may be the only album they ever do, which would be a great shame.
Electronica and emo are not obvious bedfellows, but the best elements of both are combined skilfully by the dynamic duo. Such Great Heights is a great example - a pleasing and uptempo beat with meta-referential lyrics ("I tried my best to leave this all on your machine, but the persistant beat sounded thin upon listening"). Nothing Better is a terrific boy-girl duet of the classic boy-loves-girl-but-she-doesn't-want-to-know situation, which gains added impetus when you contrast Gillard's "tell me am I right to think that there could be nothing better than making you my bride and slowly growing old together" with guess singer Jenny Lewis' "you've got allure I can't deny, but you've had your chance, oh say goodbye, say goodbye".
A few songs go for a softer tempo, contrasting between the love song Recycled Air ("I've atched the patchwork farm slow fade into the ocean's arms, calm down, release your cares, the stale taste of recycled air" is certainly a fresh lyricism, literally), and the considered This Place Is A Prison looks at the futility of mindless non-stop partying.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 16 Jan 2006
Format: Audio CD
The first time I heard any Postal Service tracks I have to say I wasnt too impressed, apart from the excellent 'The District Sleeps Alone Tonight'. However, eventually, i learned to like a number of the Service's song, and eventually took the plunge and bought Give Up. It was surprisingly awesome. NOt my usual cup of tea, to be honest, electronica and beats etc. But this has got to be one of the must-own albums for any emo or indie fan of the first few years of the 21st century. It simply suffices to say that pretty much all the tracks, apart from possibly the dark, 'This Place Is A Prison,' are standout tracks.'The DIstrict Sleeps Alone Tonight' builds up into an emo dance beat, guaranteed to get you grooving, whereever you are: car, living room, on the loo...'Recycled Air' and 'We Will Become Silhouettes' are relatively chilled out tracks, and there is the signature electronic riffs of 'Such Great Heights,' and 'Brand New Colony.' An excellent album-hopefully there's more to come.
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