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Gilbert & Sullivan: Iolanthe Import

4 customer reviews

Price: £15.83
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Frequently Bought Together

Gilbert & Sullivan: Iolanthe + Sullivan: The Yeomen of the Guard / Trial by Jury + Gondoliers
Price For All Three: £42.51

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Product details

  • Composer: Sir Arthur Sullivan
  • Audio CD (21 July 1989)
  • Number of Discs: 2
  • Format: Import
  • Label: London
  • ASIN: B0000041Q1
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 142,339 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Disc: 1
1. Iolanthe: Overture
2. Iolanthe: Act One: Tripping Hither, Tripping Thither
3. Iolanthe: Act One: Iolanthe
4. Iolanthe: Act One: Good Morrow, Good Mother
5. Iolanthe: Act One: Fare Thee Well, Attractive Stranger
6. Iolanthe: Act One: Good Morrow, Good Lover
7. Iolanthe: Act One: None Shall Part Us
8. Iolanthe: Act One: Loudly Let The Trumpet Bray
9. Iolanthe: Act One: Entrance Of The Lord Chancellor
10. Iolanthe: Act One: The Law Is The Embodiment
See all 16 tracks on this disc
Disc: 2
1. Iolanthe: Act Two - When All Night Long A Chap Remains
2. Iolanthe: Act Two - Strephon's A Member Of Parliament
3. Iolanthe: Act Two - When Britain Really Ruled The Waves
4. Iolanthe: Act Two - In Vain To Us You Plead
5. Iolanthe: Act Two - Oh, Foolish Fay
6. Iolanthe: Act Two - Though P'r'aps I May Incur Your Blame
7. Iolanthe: Act Two - Love Unrequited
8. Iolanthe: Act Two - If You Go In You're Sure to Win
9. Iolanthe: Act Two - If We're WeakEnough To Tarry
10. Iolanthe: Act Two - My Lord, A Suppliant At Your Feet
See all 12 tracks on this disc

Product Description

Product Description

DEC 414145 2; DECCA - Inghilterra; Classica Lirica Operetta

Amazon.co.uk

Iolanthe has one of the funniest lines in all of Gilbert and Sullivan. As the Peers (as in the House of Lords) enter, they sing: "Bow! Bow! Ye lower middle classes; Bow! Bow! Ye tradesmen bow ye masses; Blow the Trumpets! Bang the brasses! Tan Taran Tarah Chin Boom!" OK, so you had to have been there; but trust me, it's a riot. Anyway, this "fairy" story parody on the undine theme, about a fairy who loves a mortal, is a typically frothy confection of biting social satire and innocent sentiment. The performance by the D'Oyly Carte company is about as close to the original production as we're likely to get. --David Hurwitz

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Jayne Lindley on 12 Nov. 2002
It's so good to hear a full production of G & S. So often you just get the songs and miss all those wonderful witty lines of W S Gilberts. This production took me straight back to my childhood when I fell in love with G & S through D'Oyly Carte productions. The trio 'If you go in' with Donald Adams, Thomas Round and John Reed will never be bettered, especially by those of us who remember their on stage antics. If I have one complaint it's that some of the ladies let the side down, apart from the esteemiable Gillian Knight, who excels in the haughty Queen of the fairies. Those used to more modern productions might find some of the songs slightly slow especially if you're used to the Sir Malcolm Sargeant productions but it's worth it to be able to fully enjoy the lyrics.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By L. E. Cantrell on 2 Sept. 2010
SOURCE:
September 1960 studio recording made in London.

SOUND:
When new, the series of G&S recordings that included this "Iolanthe" was generally regarded as being at the leading edge of commercial analogue stereo. The digital remastering carried out in the late 1990s was generally successful and the sound on these CDs will be perfectly satisfactory to anyone but hyper-finicky audiophiles.

CAST:
Lord Chancellor - John Reed (patter baritone)
Earl Mountararat - Donald Adams (bass-baritone)
Earl Tolloller - Thomas Round (tenor)
Private Willis - Kenneth Sandford (bass-baritone)
Strephon - Alan Styler (baritone)
Queen of the Fairies - Gillian Knight (mezzo-soprano)
Iolanthe - Yvonne Newman (mezzo-soprano)
Celia - Jennifer Toye (soprano)
Leila - Pauline Wales (soprano)
Fleta - Dawn Bradshaw (speaking part)
Phyllis - Mary Sansom (soprano)

CONDUCTOR:
Isadore Godfrey with the D'Oyly Carte Opera Chorus, the New Symphony Orchestra of London and the Band of the Grenadier Guards.

TEXT:
With one significant exception, the text of this performance is the standard text adopted by the D'Oyly Carte Company early in the Twentieth Century and performed by them until the company's demise at the hands of the penny-pinching Thatcher government. The standard text contains one major cut from the opening night's score, a song for Strephon called "Fold Your Flapping Wings." The song was not recorded here, although it has been restored in the 1991 recording of the (quite different) New D'Oyly Carte Opera Company.

The exception to the standard text in this performance arises from the fact that the original production of "Iolanthe" was offered to the London audience in an ultra-sumptuous production.
Read more ›
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8 of 10 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 18 Feb. 2001
This is one of the finest productions I have heard of this production in a long time. Not only are the singers well-polished and enthusiastic, but the orchestra is really quite good. Of particular note is the first entrance of the Peers chorus in 'Loudly let the trumpet bray.'which is done with both the gusto and the faux seriousness it cries for. Also ther is the Lord Chancellor's very funny solo in act II 'Love unrequited.' which is also done extremly well. Overall the D'Oyle Carter do tremendous justice to this fine piece of music
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0 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Harper on 8 Mar. 2013
I simply have a long-held personal dislike of John Reed's nasality, which he brought to every role he played. The result is that although he gets diction, it's at the expense of tone: Thomas Allen's Jack Point in the Marriner Yeomen shows how patter can and should have been done, and in a geordie accent to boot!
Reed was the lead of the d'Oyly Carte Company during it's decline, but that alone does not substantiate the adulation: although as a performer his skill was unmatched, as a singer alone he left so much wanting as to lose popular support for the company at a time when it's inter-wars popularity made it a target for a new generation, and so the company did not long outlast him.
Playing the Lord Chancellor, he comes across as some form of goblin, more sneer than authority. It has the particular result that in the hit piece for his character, the Nightmare Song, he runs out of breath in the last stanza, which can only really be carried by the use of tone, as the opportunities to grab a breath are extremely short.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 10 reviews
36 of 36 people found the following review helpful
Reed, Adams, Round, Sandford and Styler, all in one! 24 Aug. 1999
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
This recording from 1960 was the second that John Reed had made. His rendition of the Lord Chancellor is a delight, although he was not fully 'rounded' in performance as in later years. This is a part that requires a mature experience. The downside being that this can also mean loss of control in diction, as was the case in his later recording of 1974. The rest of the cast are brilliant, the chorus superb and the whole performance under Isidore Godfrey magnificent. The inclusion of the use of the Grenadier Guards for the entrance of the Peers is well worth the purchase. They were usually used in performance when the company performed in London, dating a tradition from the original plan of Gilbert in his 1882 production. Of all the recordings made by the D'Oyly Carte Opera Company, especially since the late 1940's, this is quite the best. The dialogue is quite a joy and the scene from act 2, between Tolloller and Mountarat, affectionately known as the 'Thomas and George' scene is perfection itself. How we all miss such definitive renditions of the parts and with such style.
20 of 20 people found the following review helpful
The peers and Peris 27 Jun. 1999
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
This CD is much better than any other Iolanthe CD because it also has the dailogue. I found it great for myself as a performer who will appear in this play to listen to it so that I can be better aware of what is occuring so I know how to react to certain incidences. Anyone who loves Gilbert and Sullivan will love the complicated Act 1 Finale by far is one of the longest Finales written by G & S. The Invocation of Iolanthe is also quite dramatic. I hope you enjoy this CD as much as I, a seasoned Gilbert and Sullivan performer have enjoyed this awesome work of Gilbert and Sullivan.
13 of 14 people found the following review helpful
A most timely satire 16 Feb. 1999
By F. Behrens - Published on Amazon.com
Never mind that this work has some of the most beautiful music ever composed for any musical format, it is Gilbert's lifelong battle against human stupidity (is there any other kind?)that makes this libretto so incredibly timely. The second act opens with a sentry commenting on how party loyalties make it unnecessary for politicians to have any brains at all when it comes to voting; and this is followed soon after by a song about how those who govern do best when they do not meddle "in matters which they do not understand." Good advice for bureaucrats who know how to run hospitals, schools, and private behavior. For once, you might not want to program out the dialogue...which is not given separate tracking so you could not do it anyway. A real treat for those who never heard IOLANTHE and the only recording with the complete dialogue.
7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
One of Sullivan's finest 12 April 2003
By Paul A. Gerard - Published on Amazon.com
Mikado, Pirates, and Pinafore are the most POPULAR of the G&S operettas. Musically, however, the BEST three are Ruddigore, Iolanthe, and Yeomen. If you want to enjoy a total theatre experience one of the first three mentioned might be best (it would certainly be more likely). For a good listen at home - the last three, every time.

This recording is a little dated, technically and performance wise - get hold of a libretto if you can, as the words are not always quite as crystal clear as they might be, and missing any of them would really be too bad.

Until a really good modern recording replaces it - still the best recording of Iolanthe, which means one of the very best operetta recordings you can get!
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
Classic D'Oyly Carte Opera Company stereo "Iolanthe" from 1960 [II] 4 April 2007
By L. E. Cantrell - Published on Amazon.com
SOURCE: September 1960 studio recording made in London.

SOUND: When new, the series of G&S recordings that included this "Iolanthe" was generally regarded as being at the leading edge of commercial analogue stereo. The digital remastering carried out in the late 1990s was generally successful and the sound on these CDs will be perfectly satisfactory to anyone but hyper-finicky audiophiles.

CAST: Lord Chancellor - John Reed (patter baritone); Earl Mountararat - Donald Adams (bass-baritone); Earl Tolloller - Thomas Round (tenor); Private Willis - Kenneth Sandford (bass-baritone); Strephon - Alan Styler (baritone); Queen of the Fairies - Gillian Knight (mezzo-soprano); Iolanthe - Yvonne Newman (mezzo-soprano); Celia - Jennifer Toye (soprano); Leila - Pauline Wales (soprano); Fleta - Dawn Bradshaw (speaking part); Phyllis - Mary Sansom (soprano). CONDUCTOR: Isadore Godfrey with the D'Oyly Carte Opera Chorus, the New Symphony Orchestra of London and the Band of the Grenadier Guards.

TEXT: With one significant exception, the text of this performance is the standard text adopted by the D'Oyly Carte Company early in the Twentieth Century and performed by them until the company's demise at the hands of the penny-pinching Thatcher government. The standard text contains one major cut from the opening night's score, a song for Strephon called "Fold Your Flapping Wings." The song was not recorded here, although it has been restored in the 1991 recording of the (quite different) New D'Oyly Carte Opera Company.

The exception to the standard text in this performance arises from the fact that the original production of "Iolanthe" was offered to the London audience in an ultra-sumptuous production. That production had a full military brass band to play for the spectacular entrance of the peers in Act One. The D'Oyly Carte touring companies, on the other hand, playing year after year throughout the length and breadth of Britain and Ireland, could not afford the luxury of a second band. For them, Sullivan thriftily provided a version of the entrance music that could be played by the pick-up orchestras playing in the pits of provincial theaters. The touring version became the standard version and was played on all prior recordings.

It should be noted that this set was recorded at a time when the record producers elected to break with the long-established practice of omitting spoken words. The labels on both the old Lp album and the earlier version of the CD case proudly proclaimed "Complete with dialogue" and so it was and is. You are free to regard this fact as a welcome addition or as an insufferable nuisance.

COMMENTARY: This recording captures the D'Oyly Carte Opera Company--the production company founded by Gilbert, Sullivan and their producer, Richard D'Oyly Carte--in the height of its 1960s form. At its core were stars still held fondly in the hearts of many G&S afficionados worldwide: John Reed, Kenneth Sandford, Thomas Round, Donald Adams and Gillian Knight. It was certainly a very sound cast and, naturally, the most experienced in the world in the G&S repertory.

This is a performance in the classic D'Oyly Carte tradition which stretches directly back to the days when genial Sullivan conducted from the pit of the Savoy Theatre and glowering Gilbert was the stage director.

The recordings of the original DCOC can be divided into four strata: the electrical recordings of the late 1920s and early 1930s, the mono recordings of the 1950s, the first stereo recordings of the 1960s and the second stereo recordings of the 1970s. Fans debate with considerable heat about the respective merits of the three earlier strata. (Nobody pays much attention to the final one.) The 1960s cast certainly has its adherents. Purely as a matter of personal taste, I prefer the earlier ones, but they are recorded in the "historic" sound not beloved by ears accustomed to the digital era.

This "Iolanthe" is more brisk than the contemporary and rival version conducted by Sir Malcolm Sargent. However the whole Sargent series has been widely criticized from the outset as being unnecessarily lugubrious. What is recorded here is a fair presentation of the tempo of the actual DCOC stage production as I remember it. It is about the same as the 1950s version and, if anything, a bit slower than the 1930s version.

Overall, a good stereo version of "Iolanthe" displaying the absolutely authentic performing tradition for the works of Gilbert and Sullivan.

Five stars.
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