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Ghost Milk: Calling Time on the Grand Project Hardcover – 7 Jul 2011


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Product details

  • Hardcover: 432 pages
  • Publisher: Hamish Hamilton; 1st Edition edition (7 July 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0241144353
  • ISBN-13: 978-0241144350
  • Product Dimensions: 16.2 x 3.8 x 24 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 389,004 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Review

Ghost Milk reads like a meld of poet Allen Ginsberg, comic books writer Alan Moore and an anarchists' message board . . . There is no doubt that Sinclair is original, observant, a wonderful phrase maker (Evening Standard )

A wise, irascible sentinel: a guardian seeking to protect London's true soul from profiteering interventions by redevelopers and "regenerators" . . . Uncomfortable, sharp and amusing . . . Grippingly atmospheric . . . Fascinating . . . One of our most dazzling prose stylists (Daily Telegraph )

Dazzling prose . . . his language is always heightened . . . Sinclair's explorations by foot are highly engaging and anything but pedestrian (Sunday Telegraph )

A scorching 400-page diatribe against this and other "grand projects" . . . [Sinclair is] a crazily knowledgeable local historian with a shaman's grasp of strange energies, unseen ley lines, urban esoterica (Independent Magazine )

About the Author

Iain Sinclair is the author of Downriver (winner of the James Tait Black Memorial Prize and the Encore Award); Landor's Tower; White Chappell, Scarlet Tracings; Lights Out for the Territory; Lud Heat; Rodinsky's Room (with Rachel Lichtenstein); Radon Daughters; London Orbital, Dining on Stones and Hackney, that Rose-Red Empire. He is also the editor of London: City of Disappearances.

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Customer Reviews

3.3 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

15 of 17 people found the following review helpful By L. R. Fisher on 27 Jun. 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Sinclair goes out and sees what's there, and then comes back and tells us about it - like George Orwell did. Also he writes very well (ditto). He goes out and wanders around the Dome in Greenwich as TPTB wonder what to put in it, walks up the Thames to Oxford, drives around in the rain with an architect and a film maker. The architect has a brilliant plan for the north - he'll turn the M82 between Hull and Manchester into an American-style ribbon city consisting entirely of non-places: business parks, bowling alleys, supermarkets, burger bars. In the face of the patronising, opportunistic "regeneration" Sinclair discovers, this begins to appear quite attractive. At least you'd get a burger instead of a frozen fishcake in a godforsaken Italian restaurant in a "waterside development" that never quite happened. Money has been thrown at the north, eviscerated by the death of industry. It has created museums of nothing - huge showy "iconic" buildings, many now boarded up or surrounded by dog-patrolled perimeter fences. He was sure that Manchester's "marinas" now all boasted cafes and "bistros", but on a cold rainy night all he found was that doomed Italian eaterie. The regeneration money mainly went into the pockets of southerners who headed back home when the project withered and the money ran out. It's all a crying shame. And I'm disappointed that Amazon reviewers have done nothing more than titter at the title, which is silly. I think he's referring to the white smears that used to turn up on cheap coloured photographs, and suggesting that these regeneration projects are nothing more than meaningless smears on the landscape. How many artists' quarters do people need? Can you replace steelworks with coffee bars? Can you heck-as-like.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By dannyboy on 8 Nov. 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
i first heard of ian sinclair when the graphic novel writer alan moore mentioned in an interview that sinclair was his favorite living author, i decided to check him out and ordered this. its a wonderful read, its not a book to be rushed, you can come back to it , and reread chapters and find get something new from it. anybody studying to be an architect would do well to read and ponder this book
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7 of 9 people found the following review helpful By C. A. Russell on 5 Jan. 2012
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Another fascinating tour of the old places, such memories (and a few horrors) and an insight into the plans for the future of dear old London. Iain Sinclair is a man after my own heart - just wish I could write as well as he does!
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