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Ghost Girl: The True Story of a Child Who Refused to Talk Hardcover – 12 Dec 1991


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Hardcover, 12 Dec 1991
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Product details

  • Hardcover: 304 pages
  • Publisher: Little, Brown US (12 Dec. 1991)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0316351679
  • ISBN-13: 978-0316351676
  • Product Dimensions: 3.2 x 14.6 x 21.6 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (99 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 2,248,479 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Torey Hayden is an educational psychologist and a special education teacher who, since 1979, has chronicled her struggles in the classroom in a succession of bestselling books. She currently lives and writes in North Wales.

Product Description

Review

An amazing story. --Washington Post --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

About the Author

Born in Montana, USA, Torey Hayden has spent most of her adult life working with children in distress. Now living in Great Britain, she divides her time between writing and volunteer work with several British charities. Torey is author of numerous internationally best-selling books about her experiences as a special education teacher and therapist. She has also written two novels and two children's books.

Find her at www.torey-hayden.com

--This text refers to the Paperback edition.

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There were 152 miles between the city and Falls River and from there another 23 miles to Pecking. Read the first page
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Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

22 of 23 people found the following review helpful By AliG on 8 Jun. 2005
Format: Mass Market Paperback
This is the third Torey Hayden book I have read (the first two were One Child and it's sequel, Tiger's child, both excellent). This book, Ghost Girl, is incredibly moving and extremely shocking. It is hard to believe that this sort of abuse goes on, but it does, and here Torey tries so desperately to help this little girl, Jadie, a pupil in her class for special needs kids, who is an elective mute but begins to talk to Torey almost immediately. It soon becomes clear that something is very, very wrong but Torey can't quite put her finger on it, and tries very hard to encourage Jadie to tell all. When she eventually does confess to everything that is happening to her and her six year old sister, Amber, and even to her 18 month old baby sister Sapphire, Torey is terribly shocked and unsure what to do, as she has promised Jadie she won't tell anybody of their secret after school conversations. But matters take a dramatic turn - you'll have to read it to find out the rest! I really enjoy reading Torey's books and find them hard to put down once started, and I am about to order 2 more to take on holiday with me! Highly recommended.
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16 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Fran on 6 May 2006
Format: Paperback
I had read One Child and I loved that and I bought the sequel which I have also read. I bought this one as soon as it came out.

This book is about a child called Jadie who is an elective mute (doesn't talk because she doesn't want to) and when she does start to talk, the stories she tells Torey disturb her and draw her closer to her. I don't want to say more as it may ruin it, but it is certainly a mesmeriing read.

As someone else has said, this isn't for the faint of heart. But it depends on that and not your age; I am 15, for example. It did disturb and unsettle me as I have never read anything like this before and everything is detailed.

You really feel for the child, Jadie, and sometimes you can't quite believe what is happening.

Couldn't put it down, and I had to with great difficulty. It is different to her other books due to the fact that it may disturb some people more so than other novels similar to this. This book really makes you stop and think.

Buy it if you already love Hayden but if you are a first time buyer of Hayden, or any other real life reads, perhaps don't go for this one as it is intense. I'd recommend One Child by Hayden instead.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Ms. A. J. Burcham on 23 May 2006
Format: Paperback
Im 19 years old and in my life have read many different kinds of books, from mills and boon to stephen king but no book has ever gripped me like Hayden's ghost girl.

I havent read any of her other books i just picked it up one day and thought it sounded good, i was amazed at how gripping it was and how emotionally involved you get in the evolution of the story, and then to find out its a true story hits you all over again.

Fantastic book, i am definitely going to have to collect her other books.
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32 of 35 people found the following review helpful By Tracey on 15 Sept. 2004
Format: Mass Market Paperback
It's hard to describe the effect this book had on me. But two things remain solid in my mind, firstly the harsh reality that what happened to this young girl happens in reality and far too often and secondly the passion of a teacher who is just not prepared to give up hope in finding the truth.
Absolutely fantastic book that not only captured my attention within the first paragraph but also brought me to tears. When I started reading this book, I couldn't put it down and had to finish reading it the same day. Which is exactly what I did.
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44 of 49 people found the following review helpful By Fateful 1 on 31 Dec. 2004
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Once again Torey Hayden writes a book that is hard to put down, filled with emotion and makes the reader really think. The story centers on a teacher that tries to help a child through a devastating time in her life. This is a real page turner.
Other books to look for: Nightmares Echo by Katlyn Stewart, One Child by Torey Hayden and A Child Called It by David Pelzer
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37 of 42 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 13 July 2005
Format: Paperback
Once again Torey Hayden has written an outstanding book about her work with children. This book is mainly about Jadie, who, at 8 is (s)electively mute, walks hunched over and expresses fears that initially seem bizarre.
At the opening of the book, Torey Hayden meets Jadie and her classmates after half term break. Within a short space of time during that first day together, Jadie broke her self imposed silence and spoke softly when asked a direct question. From that point on, Jadie's verbal progress is remarkable. A bright, expressive child, Jadie described a bizarre life outside of the classroom that certainly makes for a strong case for ritual abuse. Luckily Jadie was provided with a classroom environment in which she felt safe.
Jadie feared spiders because she believed they could hear her and "tell on her" if she divulged anything that could be construed as a breach of confidence. She explained her posture as a means of "keeping her insides from falling out;" she fears the number 6 and worries about her younger sister surviving her sixth birthday; she said adults she knew told her how at six one gains power and how people can hurt others with impunity; she describes drinking blood as "oily" and "slipping down." Ghosts and themes of death are trenchant; many of Jadie's early drawings are of ghosts and she said that she and her little sisters were ghosts at night. She also believed that a playmate who had allegedly died had become a ghost and that that child's ghost had gotten into her, Jadie.
Each fear she expressed can be traced to ritual abuse. In many cases, ritual abusers claim that spiders as well as insects spy on children and report anything the children might tell.
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