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Ghost Children Audio CD – 1 Jul 2013


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Product details

  • Audio CD
  • Publisher: Whole Story Audiobooks; Unabridged Audiobook edition (1 July 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1471241645
  • ISBN-13: 978-1471241642
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (25 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 3,813,061 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Born in Leicester in 1946, Sue left school at 15 years of age. She married at 18, and by 23 was a single parent with three children. She worked in a variety of jobs including factory worker, shop assistant, and as a youth worker on adventure playgrounds. She wrote in secret for twenty years, eventually joining a writers' group at the Phoenix Theatre, Leicester in her thirties.

At the age of 35, she won the Thames Television Playwright Award for her first play, Womberang, and started her writing career. Other plays followed including The Great Celestial Cow (1984), Ten Tiny Fingers, Nine Tiny Toes (1990), and most recently You, me and Wii (2010), but she became most famous for her series of books about Adrian Mole, which she originally began writing in 1975.

The first of these, The Secret Diary of Adrian Mole aged 13 ¾ was published in 1982 and was followed by The Growing Pains of Adrian Mole (1984). These two books made her the best-selling novelist of the 1980s. They have been followed by several more in the same series including Adrian Mole: The Wilderness Years (1993); Adrian Mole and the Weapons of Mass Destruction (2004); and most recently Adrian Mole: The Prostrate Years (2009). The books have been adapted for radio, television and theatre; the first being broadcast on radio in 1982. Townsend also wrote the screenplays for television adaptations of the first and second books and Adrian Mole: The Cappuccino Years (published 1998, BBC television adaptation 2001).

Several of her books have been adapted for the stage, including The Secret Diary of Adrian Mole aged 13 ¾: The Play (1985) and The Queen and I: a Play with Songs (1994), which was performed by the Out of Joint Touring Company at the Vaudeville Theatre and toured Australia. The latter is based on another of her books, in which the Royal Family become deposed and take up residence on a council estate in Leicester. Other books include Rebuilding Coventry (1988), Ghost Children (1997) and Queen Camilla (2006).

She was an honorary MA of Leicester University, and in 2008 she was made a Distinguished Honorary Fellow, the highest award the University can give. She was an Honorary Doctor of Letters at Loughborough University, and a Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature. Her other awards include the James Joyce Award of the Literary and Historical Society of University College Dublin, and the Frink Award at the Women of the Year Awards. In 2009 she was given the Honorary Freedom of Leicester.

Her most recent novel, The Woman Who Went to Bed for a Year, was published in 2012 by Michael Joseph and was a giant success, selling over half a million copies to date in the UK alone.


Product Description

Sue Townsend, creator of the much-loved Adrian Mole series, tells a compassionate and gritty story of love and loss in Ghost Children Seventeen years ago Angela Carr aborted an unwanted child. The child's father, Christopher Moore, was devastated by the loss and retreated from the world. However, when he makes a horrifying discovery on the heath, he finds that he is compelled to confront Angela about the past. As they start seeing each other again, can they avoid past mistakes? And will their future together be eclipsed by the mistakes of yesterday?

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The dog had always been a fool, look at it now, dragging a bin liner out of the ditch. Read the first page
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Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By A. Lewis on 5 Mar 2010
Format: Paperback
A harrowing and poignant account of the after-effects of abortion on both genders, what it's like to feel there's something missing when you don't have children, and child abuse/neglect.
Hard to read at times, as there is graphic imagery (particularly a description of a D-I-Y abortion) and upsetting content but all the same engrossing.
As in other examples of Townsend's work, such as The Queen and I, each character has their own distinct voice and she switches between them effortlessly.
The dark content is a stark contrast to the lighter, more comedic tone of the Adrian Mole series.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By H. Petre on 6 May 2012
Format: Paperback
Sue Townsend is a superb author. In this true-to-life tale, Townsend describes her central characters without judgement, leaving the reader to decide. There are no heroes here, but real people who in one way or another are all victims of poverty, ignorance, addiction, loss, or grief. The story centres on two couples: Angela and Christopher who were together seventeen years ago until a difficult abortion forced them apart, and Tamara and Crackle, a young mother with learning difficulties, her crack-addicted boyfriend, and their toddler, Storme, named after a character from the 90s Tv show, Gladiators. All of this is set in a stark wintry landscape around an unnamed East Midlands town. If this sounds too grim for words, please don't give up before you start. The story line, dark though it may be, draws the reader in, and there are a couple of wry twists in the very tail end.
An unexpected quality emerges on reading this book for the first time, twelve years after publication: the Britain Townsend describes already seems vanished: no more Woolworths pick-n-mix, no more shabby charity shops selling a golf ball next to a single sock and a dog bowl. No more cameras with film that must be waited for to be developed. Even the Greasy Spoon cafes and the high street travel agents are on the way out. If, as Philip Larkin says, That will be England gone, I can think of no finer way to to document its passing.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Fairy Mary666 on 20 Jan 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This is a really riveting, though at times, quite a disquieting read. I read this after reading 'The Woman who went to Bed for a Year.' Two quite different reads, I I actually preferred this one. A very interesting take on finding your first love all over again. In some ways, quite sad too. Definitely recommended!
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 2 July 1999
Format: Paperback
The first book I read in ages, Ghost Children kept me glued to the pages and, to use an old cliche, I couldn't put it down. Literally. Admittedly, I bought the book after reading Adrian Mole, not worrying too much about the subject. I was in fact immediatedly disappointed by the lack of humour as is typical of Townsend but I soon realised that humour in dealing with a book like this would be inappropriate and Townsend's tyle is perfect, dealing with the subject very well indeed. Thouroughly enjoyable.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Mrs. K. A. Wheatley TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 1 Sep 2014
Format: Paperback
A pretty harrowing read to be honest. I have always avoided this novel of Townsend's, knowing what subject matter she would be addressing and not being entirely comfortable with it. After her death I decided to make an effort to read her entire oeuvre and this was the last thing on my list.

I cannot say I like it. I cannot say I enjoyed reading it. It was uncomfortable and upsetting, but written in her usual clear style with her eye for social niceties, and otherwise, used to full effect. The satire and darkness which lurks under the gentle exterior of the Mole books, and is more fully expressed in the later Mole volumes, and in The Woman Who Went to Bed for a Year, is given free rein here, and with little humour to lift it. Understandably, given the content.

Not a favourite of mine. I prefer it when she wrote with a slightly lighter touch, not because what she had to say was any less important then, because she could still cut to the heart of an issue, I just prefer a little light in the middle of bleakness.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Mrs Anne skerritt on 19 Feb 2014
Format: Kindle Edition
Another great read from my favourite author. The title was off putting and that's why I didn't read it before now. Shocking, moving and addictive.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By red+white lady on 1 Dec 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
A brilliant book. Very entertaining, and I found it hard to put down. A great read. Almost believavble The plot was intriguing.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Sheila Jarvie on 23 Aug 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I found this book to be really interesting I couldn't put it down!
I thought it was very well written but I think all of Sue Townsend books are great you know when you buy one of her books that you are in for a treat!
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