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Getting There Paperback – 11 Jan 2002


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Product details

  • Paperback: 336 pages
  • Publisher: Picador; New edition edition (11 Jan 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0330480383
  • ISBN-13: 978-0330480383
  • Product Dimensions: 12 x 2.6 x 18.2 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,270,216 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Product Description

About the Author

Manjula Padmanabhan is a well known playwright, cartoonist and journalist in India (winning a highly prestigious prize for her most recent play, Harvest). Getting There is her first book. Her children's books will be published in the UK next year and she is currently at work on a novel. She lives in Delhi.

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 11 Jan 2001
Format: Paperback
Readers always have various expectations about a novel. They want an exciting story, with laughs and tears, if possible also some thoughts and interesting ideas to reflect upon, etc This new book by Manjula Padmanabhan has all of that. The story is a caleidoscopic adventure of a young woman, looking for her own identity. Whether she has fallen in love with a Dutch man, seems an open question, but she finally ends up in Holland, after a detour to the USA and Germany. This story line serves as a perfect framework to describe all the possible dangers one can meet in such a quest. There are the expectations of friends and family members, the differences between cultures , eventually also the moral dilemmas, and of course the problems of the flesh. In fact, the story starts with this physical theme, as the main character wants to start a diet. The author writes in the "I"-formula, which serves the purpose very well : the naivete of the young woman, falling into many traps and beset by many different characters , is described in a brilliantly observant way. The reader finds himself immediately empathic, also because all these scenes are very recognisable. Furthermore, the author takes the occasion to make sparkling remarks, nearly on every page. Just one of the many examples is found on p. 184 (about the USA): "... a culture in which everything that is worth seeing is instantly sucked into the visual vocabulary of the advertising industry.." Obviously, the style of writing is very crisp and clear, with humor of a soft cynical nature and also lively dialogues : no less is expected from an award-winning play-writer. Yet, as the story proceeds, events that might seem funny at first, get an increasingly darker undertone, and the end is exceptionally strong.Read more ›
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 10 Jan 2001
Format: Paperback
Readers always have various expectations about a novel. They want an exciting story with laughs and tears, if possible also some thoughts and interesting ideas to reflect upon, etc. This new book by Manjula Padmanabhan has all of that. The story is a caleidoscopic adventure of a young woman, looking for her own identity. Whether she has fallen in love with a Dutch man, seems an open question, but she ends up finally in Holland, after a detour to the USA and Germany. This story line serves as a perfect framework to describe all the possible dangers one can encounter in such a quest. There are the expectations of friends and family , the differences between cultures, eventually also moral dilemmas, and of course the problems of the flesh. In fact, the story starts with the "physical" theme, as the main character wants to start a diet. The author writes in the "I"-form, which serves the purpose very well: the naivete of the young woman, falling into many traps and beset by many different characters, is described in a brilliantly observant way. The reader finds himself immediately empathic, also because all these scenes are very recognisable. Furthermore, the author takes the occasion to make sparkling remarks, nearly on every page. Just one of the many examples is found on page 184 ( about the USA) :"...a culture in which everything that is worth seeing is instantly sucked into the visual vocabulary of the advertising industry"... Obviously, the style of writing is very crisp and clear, with humor of a soft cynical nature and also lively dialogues : no less is expected from an award-winning play-writer. Yet, as the story proceeds, events that might seem funny at first, get an increasingly darker undertone, and the end is exceptionally strong.Read more ›
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