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Getting Started with Laravel 4 Paperback – 20 Jan 2014

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Product details

  • Paperback: 128 pages
  • Publisher: Packt Publishing (20 Jan. 2014)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1783287039
  • ISBN-13: 978-1783287031
  • Product Dimensions: 19 x 0.7 x 23.5 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 2.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 355,921 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Product Description

About the Author

Raphaël Saunier

Raphaël Saunier works as a full-stack Web Developer for Information Architects in Zürich, Switzerland. He holds a degree in Information Management for Business from University College London.

He is always looking for excuses to learn and play with new technologies, tools, and techniques. He is also able to make pragmatic decisions that take into account the strengths and weaknesses of the many well-established tools at the disposal of web developers.

A strong advocate of Laravel, Ember.js, Vim, and PostgreSQL when he is among developers, he is also passionate about teaching programming and general computer literacy to people of all ages.


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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By W Boudville on 3 Feb. 2014
Format: Paperback
PHP has a well deserved reputation for producing or more accurately having lousy code written in it. As the book frankly explains, it grew up to be great for rapidity of learning and quick deployment of small code bases for web server programming. But the early authors of PHP perhaps never anticipated the increasing needs and complexity of web sites. The attraction of Laravel version 4 is that if you code PHP within it, you effectively use frameworks or patterns. Specifically Model View Controller [MVC]. It is not much of an exaggeration that MVC forms the core structure of many web sites.

The success of Ruby on Rails speaks to how useful programmers have found a language that enforces MVC. So the book testifies to a metagame of leapfrog, played across computer languages. You see that the coders of Laravel 4 have keyed off the success of Ruby on Rails and Python to make a feedback loop that goes back around to the earlier language of PHP and to improve it.

The first chapter is a veritable laundry list of enhancements that Laravel 4 immediately gives you. Read it closely. The details are expanded upon in the rest of the text.

Paranoid readers might also pay attention to chapter 4. It delves into how to use Laravel 4 to secure your webpages against attackers. Techniques well known in other languages like guarding against SQL injection in user text input fields can be easily implemented here. Attention has been paid to letting you bolt down your website in a robust and rapid manner.
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1 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Mr. R. Wenman on 14 Feb. 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Disappointed at how short this book is, after trimming preface it's barely 100 pages. It does go over everything you need to get started with Laravel which I suppose is exactly what the title promises but I found it lacking in detail in places where it should be more descriptive, given that it is meant as an introduction to Laravel for developers.

The book reads as a set of instructions for setting up a Laravel site, which is disappointing because there are plenty of free tutorials on the internet that do that. When I buy a book I expect it to go into more detail with regards to why and how things are done, what goes on behind the scenes etc which is often skipped in free tutorials taken from the web. Sadly they skipped them in this book too.

The book does what is says on the cover and will get you going with a basic Laravel site but you can find plenty of other free tutorials online to do the same thing. For the amount I paid for this book I expected a lot more than what I got.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 12 reviews
13 of 13 people found the following review helpful
Frustrating! I found it Impossible to follow along with demo projects. 25 Feb. 2014
By Tyler Youngblood - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
The code in the book is poorly explained and doesn't match the downloadable code. There are dozens of differences between the book version and the downloadable version of the code. I could never get the book version of the code to work. Eventually I compared my code written from the book to the downloadable version line-by-line and made the appropriate corrections. And these weren't errors or bugs on my part, they were differences in syntax (many in routes.php), like using return View::make('dogs/index') where the book explicitly talked about using dogs.index (dot instead of forward slash). There were also extra routes in my code that were missing from the downloaded version of the routes.php file.

I teach college level PHP classes and I'm a junior developer at a web development company. I've played with CodeIgniter and CakePHP, so although I'm not an MVC expert, I do have some experience with MVCs. When the web dev team I work with decided that we wanted to start using a framework to streamline project development we researched and landed on Laravel. The first book I skimmed was CodeBright by Dayle Rees. It looked promising but was over 400 pages. So when I found this book at 140 pages I figured I'd give it a shot. Big mistake.

It took me two days to troubleshoot and work through chapter 3. Eventually I was able to get the demo project mostly working, but only after a lot of debugging. I don't have the patience to finish the book. I'm going to switch to learning Laravel through the CodeBright book - hopefully the extra 250 pages will make the process less painful.

Maybe if you're very experienced with other MVCs this book will be easier for you to have success with. But I can't imagine how since the code shown in the book is inconsistent with the downloadable code. Hopefully the author will release an improved second version.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Good read if you're new, but one of many 16 Mar. 2014
By Chris Pitt - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition
The Good

This book is aimed at newcomers to PHP development, and to Laravel 4 in particular. It doesn't disappoint. It starts slow, talking about the need for, and role filled by frameworks. It explains what Composer does, and why it's useful for frameworks like Laravel. It's not the typical "Laravel needs Composer, here's the code you use" stuff.

There are 40 pages of what is essentially a very gentle introduction, before you even start writing code. This is often a vital, missing part of introductory books, and it is refreshing to see Raphaël Saunier approach it delicately.

The book demonstrates how to build a simple application, introducing readers to the most basic usages of Eloquent, Schema Builder, Blade and the various other parts of the framework. None of it's complicated. Yet it's not just a rehash of the official docs, so there's value to be had in coding alongside.

The remaining sections cover (albeit briefly) testing, building artisan commands, structuring more advanced applications and using the in-built helpers. If you are familiar with Laravel, then you "may want to consider acquiring a different book". As I said, this book is aimed at newcomers. It may not be as comprehensive (or indeed as popular) as Code Bright, but it's worth your time.

The Bad

I mentioned Code Bright, back there, because it is the definitive introduction to Laravel 4. Building on the success of Code Happy (the Laravel 3 iteration), Dayle has written a great book.

I was mildly surprised to find this book slight more expensive than Code Bright. At the current rate of exchange, it's about 3 pounds more costly to buy this book than it is Code Bright. When you consider that this book is also teaching less, and just one of many Laravel 4 books currently vying for public attention, it's difficult to tell where this book is likely to end up.

I want to tell you to buy it, and if you can get it for cheaper (though the price tag I was comparing was directly from Packt) then it might not be a bad deal. If you need to choose between the two, I suggest you first consider Code Bright before this book. I mean no disrespect to Raphaël. Code Bright is just a better deal.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Good intro into the Laravel framework 27 Oct. 2014
By StageCoachDriver - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
As with most computer training manuals, the code practice snippets in the book don't match the downloadable snippets. On the up side, the book uses SQLLite which has no installation or setup.

It gives a good overview of Laravel and is one of the few Lavavel books available.
robust 3 Feb. 2014
By W Boudville - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
PHP has a well deserved reputation for producing or more accurately having buggy code written in it. As the book frankly explains, it grew up to be great for rapidity of learning and quick deployment of small code bases for web server programming. But the early authors of PHP perhaps never anticipated the increasing needs and complexity of web sites. The attraction of Laravel version 4 is that if you code PHP within it, you effectively use frameworks or patterns. Specifically Model View Controller [MVC]. It is not much of an exaggeration that MVC forms the core structure of many web sites.

The success of Ruby on Rails speaks to how useful programmers have found a language that enforces MVC. So the book testifies to a metagame of leapfrog, played across computer languages. You see that the coders of Laravel 4 have keyed off the success of Ruby on Rails and Python to make a feedback loop that goes back around to the earlier language of PHP and to improve it.

The first chapter is a veritable laundry list of enhancements that Laravel 4 immediately gives you. Read it closely. The details are expanded upon in the rest of the text.

Careful readers might also pay attention to chapter 4. It delves into how to use Laravel 4 to secure your webpages against attackers. Techniques well known in other languages like guarding against SQL injection in user text input fields can be easily implemented here. Attention has been paid to letting you bolt down your website in a robust and rapid manner.
The Good: There are a lot of nice concepts in ... 17 Jan. 2015
By Kevin Nabity - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
The Good:

There are a lot of nice concepts in this book to get you started or refer back to; it is short and has a nice introduction leading up to the coding.

The Bad:

You don't really start to do much coding until halfway through the book. The exercise files don't match up with the code provided in the book. You have to install composer, migrate, and seed every directory for every chapter of the exercise files, just to get them to work. Chapters 03, 04, & 06 seem to work, but I couldn't even get Chapter 05's exercise files to function. I'm switching to a different book...I may revisit this book in the future when I can fix all the mistakes and have a better understanding of all the problems. By that point I would hope I have no use for this book anymore.
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