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Getting More: How to Negotiate to Achieve Your Goals in the Real World Audio CD – Audiobook, 11 Jan 2011

3.7 out of 5 stars 26 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Audio CD
  • Publisher: Random House Audio; Unabridged edition (11 Jan. 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0307749126
  • ISBN-13: 978-0307749123
  • Product Dimensions: 12.9 x 4 x 14.9 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (26 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 2,158,919 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Product Description

Review

The world's best negotiator (City AM )

A superb how-to book (Kirkus Reviews )

It's not surprising that, in an era of cuts and job losses, what folk most want to know about is Getting More (The Times )

Excellent - gives one the interest and confidence to start negotiating (Irish Independent )

From advising on how to negotiate with terrorists, to industrial disputes, to children, his twelve rules of negotiation promise to open new doors every day (Radio 1 )

Practical, immediately applicable and highly effective. (Evan Wittenberg, Head Of Global Leadership Development, Google )

I rely on Stuart Diamond's negotiation tools every day (Christian Hernandez, Head Of International Business Development, Facebook ) --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

About the Author

Stuart Diamond runs the most popular course at Wharton, often ranked as the world's best business school. He has advised leading companies and organisations - from Google to the UN - on how to make deals. His unique negotiating process has settled thousands of disputes, including the Hollywood Writers' Strike. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.


Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I bought this book after reading a lengthy newspaper article based on an interview with the author. His approach to negotiating appeared far more intelligent and perceptive than other authors on the subject. Unfortunately, within a chapter or so of this book it had already become clear that 80% of the information and ideas it contains were present in the original 1000-word interview.

So essentially, this book is an excellent 2000-word essay inflated to a nauseating 80000-word paperback through endless repetition. The book is saturated with "real-life examples" from students that he has taught. Examples might conceivably be useful as a means of exploring his ideas in greater depth if they were deconstructed, or used as a means to analyse subtle mistakes in negotiation. But they don't -- they are all superficial, happy-ending retellings of the same storyline: "I had this student once, they used my ideas brilliantly in some negotiation, and now they are rich and happy!". These intrude constantly on the narrative, so that after the first half-dozen, it feels as though the programme is interrupted every five minutes by yet another commercial for a product I have already paid for.

Presumably Stuart Diamond fell victim to the familiar publisher's belief that customers think that 2000 words repeated 40 times is worth 40 times more, and that everything has to be crammed into a familiar, fashionable format. Indeed, traces of the publisher's interference are regularly evident, which is never a good sign.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This book has some useful points and a slightly different approach to negotiation, being less technical than most others with little talk of BATNA's, leverage and the like. On a less positive note its use of emotional triggers and validating the other person by forming a personal connection felt shallow and manipulative at times. For example talking about football or children with low paid restaurant staff in order to get a discount on a meal! These anecdotes were usually topped off with the mostly irrelevent detail that the person involved was a vice president, top executive or consultant of some big company or other, to give the whole story (and the author) some credibility (e.g. an example of a homeless person negotiating a job, free meal or room in a hotel would have been far more impressive and inspiring). Other than that the whole thing seems at least a hundred pages too long, descending into repeated often irrelevent and unecessary stories of negotiation successes, based on use of the tools in the book, although most of them seem like common sense, and many people would use them without thinking. This book could have been a heck of a lot shorter, less smug and rambling.

On a positive note, it is a timely reminder that people should treat each other with respect and decency when things get rough no matter where you are, and its usually better to observe than talk, and for that reason it is worth a browse. The parts on reframing and the use of standards will come in handy the next time you feel a call to Customer Services coming on and your bloods boiling. Just don't waste the time of busy restaurant staff pretending you are interested in their kids or favourite sport just to get a small discount on a meal. One final point: Any book that seriously quotes the phrase "humanely slaughtered cows" to get around a vegetarian should get 5 stars for a lack of irony.
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Format: Paperback
I have little doubt that Stuart Diamond is a fantastic negotiator, and none that he is a terrible author. This is no crime; it is not what he does, but surely he could have enlisted (or his publisher could have insisted on) some professional help to make his book readable.

This book is 380+ oversized pages of rambling generalisations and disorganised half-principles that leave the reader utterly unsure of the point he's trying to make. If he were to re-visit the tome and distil it into perhaps 1/3 of the words with the aim of teaching the reader useful lessons rather than raconteuring about so many of his friends and cronies we might be getting somewhere.

I'm going back onto Amazon now to try to find a useable book on negotiation, and the local recycling skip is about to become a bit heavier.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Sadly this book suffers from multiple personality disorder, as it tries to combine two very different negotiating goals into a single set of techniques.
1) Expand the pie: find unequal items to trade so everyone gains something that they value more than the the thing they lose; focus on emotions; listen to the other person.
2) Hold people to a set of rules or standards even when it forces them to lose; manipulate people's emotions; use Socratic reasoning to take people down a logical path they don't want to agree with.
These two sets of techniques aren't contradictory, but as you see in each of the (many, many) examples only one of the two mentalities can be used at a time. Stuart Diamond tries to sell it as a compassionate and empowering form of negotiating where everyone can get more, which may be true in the case of the first techniques when negotiators are thinking outside the box and giving everyone value. But the second techniques, which factor into most of his success stories, are manipulative and focus on getting the most for the party that knows how to use these techniques.

Also, horribly written. Stuart Diamond must be a master negotiator if he convinced a publisher that he didn't need a professional writer to make the stories clearer and the overall themes more concise.
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