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Get Her Off the Pitch!: How Sport Took Over My Life Audio CD – Abridged, Audiobook, CD


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Product details

  • Audio CD
  • Publisher: Fourth Estate; Abridged edition edition (1 Oct 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0007306172
  • ISBN-13: 978-0007306176
  • Product Dimensions: 14.1 x 1.5 x 14 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (21 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,357,229 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

Praise for ‘Eats, Shoots and Leaves’:

‘If Lynne Truss were Roman Catholic I'd nominate her for sainthood' Frank McCourt

'This book will stimulate and satisfy. It's worth its weight in gold.' Independent

'Lynne Truss deserves to be piled high with honours' Sunday Times

From the Author

1. Tell us a little bit about yourself.
I’m five foot nine. I’ve weighed the same for about five years, but every day I read the scales and say the same thing: “Oh, surely not.” I spend all my time writing and emailing. If I can’t get an internet connection, I panic. I text all day, or at least until all my texting friends drop from fatigue. I am in love with communication. The most tragic moment in literature for me is when that confessional note goes under that carpet in Tess of the D’Urbervilles.

2. What books have had a lasting impact on you?
Well, Tess of the D’Urbervilles, obviously. Looking back, I think I was unusual in how much comic writing I read when I was young. Books like 1066 and All That and How to be Topp. I loved the American writer Betty MacDonald. I read Keith Waterhouse. But when you look at my own work, I think you can quite clearly detect the influence of D.H. Lawrence, Marcel Proust, Samuel Beckett, Mrs Oliphant, H. Ryder Haggard and of course that woman who wrote Milly Molly Mandy.

3. Why do you write?
It’s an inexplicable urge. It was a suppressed urge for a very long time, too: I was in my mid-thirties before I started writing fiction or drama, which I think explains the terribly urgent urgency of this urge. My ex-boyfriend still describes me as the only person he knows who goes on holiday just so that she can slave over a keyboard somewhere else.

4. As an author, what are you most proud of writing?
My novel Tennyson’s Gift. Written mostly on holiday, as it happens.

5. What is your biggest failure?
My novel Tennyson’s Gift. It was a critical success, but it didn’t sell.

6. When you were a child, what did you think you would be when you grew up?
I think I always wanted to write, but for a long time it was obvious to me that I would happily settle for being a library assistant. The main thing about me is that I come from a working-class background; I was considerably exceeding expectations just by sitting A levels.

7. If you could go anywhere in time for one day, where would you go and why?
Interestingly, I used to have a ready answer to this question. I used to be sure that I would go straight back to the late 1860s and witness Charles Dickens giving one of his dramatic readings of “Sikes and Nancy”, possibly in America. But I went off this idea a bit when it was incorporated into one of the very first plots in the revamped Doctor Who. It was a big shock, realising that someone else had the same idea (except for wanting to see Dickens in Cardiff). So I think what I’d really have to choose now would be to see my parents when they were young. Annoyingly, they did that story on Doctor Who as well, though. Heavens, I’m so obvious.

8. Do you like reading on e-books?

I haven’t done it. I bought a Sony Reader for my niece at Christmas and she loves it. (I’m trying to sound helpful.)

9. What are you working on at the moment?
I’ve just finished work on the third series of my radio comedy Inspector Steine, to be aired in September/October 2009 on Radio 4. It’s about the police in Brighton in the 1950s, with a terrific regular cast, and I’d like to write it for ever. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

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Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Peter Durward Harris #1 HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWER on 6 Jun 2012
Format: Paperback
The author lived in blissful ignorance of sport for about four decades of her life, prior to a sports editor deciding that she would be the ideal person to provide his newspaper with a different perspective on sport, particularly football. Having assured himself of her unfamiliarity with sport or its personalities, he offered her a job as sports writer. It lasted for about four years, at which point the author quit following the death of her sister, but it would be a few more years before a book was published about this period of her life,

This very funny book has chapters on some sports that the author ended up liking to varying degrees, these being boxing, football, tennis, golf and cricket, with one chapter devoted to rounding up sports that she never particularly enjoyed for a variety of reasons. As a spectacle, it seems that basketball was the worst for her, although motor racing wasn`t a lot better from her perspective. She indicates that she might have liked horse racing better, but she found the attitude of the regular sports writers to be particularly unpleasant. Shame, really, because her take on Royal Ascot might be entertaining, and of course would have given her an opportunity to wear one of those hats.

At one point think that she might like to have Alan Shearer's children, she ended up not liking him at all, Just as well she didn't have those children, eh?

The author was frustrated about many other things in her four years as a sports writer - transport and accommodation foremost among them. She bemoans the lack of directions for stadiums, suggesting that maybe the authorities don't see the need to signpost them as they tend to be conspicuous anyway, True, but it can still be confusing, especially if there are two near other.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer TOP 1000 REVIEWER on 26 Oct 2009
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
A funny and thoughtful view of Lynne Truss' life as a rather unconventional sports journalist. I'm sorry not to have been in the country when she did the actual pieces, but hopefully, it will not be the last time they take the opportunity to get an outsider's view on a traditional subject.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Hywel James TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 7 July 2010
Format: Hardcover
"Get Her Off The Pitch" is a pleasure to read. There are a great many "laugh out loud" moments as you'd expect with this writer, but also many moments of thoughtful reflection that give the book depth and significance. While much of the writing is plainly autobiographical, there are passages here about sport and its place in our culture which are profoundly important and as such it is not a book limited to readers only interested in sport. Highly recommended to anyone who enjoys good writing.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Neutral VINE VOICE on 21 Jan 2010
Format: Hardcover
Lynn Truss has written a funny, if occasionally crude, book which covers the range of emotions journalists regularly experience in reporting the over-rated world of sport. Sports writing "is not so much a job as a predicament". It's not all about the contest but finding a seat in the stadium, checking the television replay, or even arguing with officials about your press pass. It's also about putting sport into its proper context as Boris Becker did after suffering an unexpected loss at Wimbledon, "Nobody died. I just lost a tennis match". By comparison, of course, Bill Shankley said, "Some people think football's a matter of life and death. It's more serious than that."

What Truss learned was that sport in the flesh is significantly different from that seen on the screen. She described Lennox Lewis knocking out Frans Botha with a punch which left the South African suffering "the sort of undignified exit usually associated with two muscular nightclub bouncers with the benefit of a run-up." That Lewis could deliver such a powerful punch from rest left Truss gasping for superlatives. "I can only report it's worth seeing". Presumably as long as you're not on the receiving end.

Professing total ignorance Truss soon learned the tools of the trade in football were knowing the club's ground (and being able to find it!!), the names of the manager and chairman and the club's nickname. Unable to find one ground she asked the way and was gently pointed in the direction of massive floodlights, a sure sign of the heavenly city. Eventually her travelling redefined her image of the places she visited and she found herself drawn into the emotion of the games (who didn't when David Ellary appeared to rob Chesterfield of a place in the FA Cup Final?).
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Cheshire Tiger on 7 Aug 2010
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I enjoyed this book. It's both thoughtful and humorous. It was a very good idea to make a young female, graduate "sporting agnostic" a sports reporter, and she offers a refreshing outsider's view into the largely male world of sport, its reporters, its followers, and the people who run it and participate in it.

I think what I enjoyed most was her comment at the end: "I am mostly very proud of having been a sports writer, and grateful that I was given the chance to do something so extraordinary - and I can be quite sharp with anyone who is snobby about sport, that's for sure".

Good for you, Lynne Truss, and thanks for a good book.
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Format: Paperback
This is a book of two halves. I found the first half to be fresh and enjoyable. The author has an amusing turn of phrase and it was interesting to get her take on being a female in a male world and reporting on sports about which she knew little. But that about sums the book up and although the various chapters deal with different sports it was more or less the same stuff the whole time and it got a bit repetitive and slightly boring. I found myself checking how much more was left to read - not a good sign.
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