or
Sign in to turn on 1-Click ordering.
More Buying Choices
Have one to sell? Sell yours here
Available to Download Now
 
Buy the MP3 album for £15.98
 
 
 
 
Sorry, this item is not available in
Image not available for
Colour:
Image not available

 

Gesualdo: Tenebrae [Original recording reissued]

Hilliard Ensemble, Carlo Gesualdo, Tenebrae Audio CD
5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
Price: £23.00 & FREE Delivery in the UK. Details
o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o
Only 4 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
Want it tomorrow, 18 Sep.? Choose Express delivery at checkout. Details
Buy the MP3 album for £15.98 at the Amazon Digital Music Store.


Amazon Artist Stores

All the music, full streaming songs, photos, videos, biographies, discussions, and more.
.

Frequently Bought Together

Gesualdo: Tenebrae + Gesualdo: Complete Madrigals Box Set [Delitię Musicę, Marco Longhini] [Naxos: 8507013]
Price For Both: £52.99

Buy the selected items together

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought


Product details

  • Orchestra: Hilliard Ensemble
  • Composer: Carlo Gesualdo
  • Audio CD (19 Dec 2008)
  • Number of Discs: 2
  • Format: Original recording reissued
  • Label: ECM New Series
  • ASIN: B000025YNV
  • Other Editions: Audio CD
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 117,022 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Listen to Samples and Buy MP3s

Songs from this album are available to purchase as MP3s. Click on "Buy MP3" or view the MP3 Album.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         


Disc 1:

Samples
Song Title Time Price
Listen  1. Tenebrae, Feria V "In Coena Domini": Resp. 1 4:22£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  2. Tenebrae, Feria V "In Coena Domini": Resp. 2 4:23£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  3. Tenebrae, Feria V "In Coena Domini": Resp. 3 6:56£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  4. Tenebrae, Feria V "In Coena Domini": Resp. 4 3:31£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  5. Tenebrae, Feria V "In Coena Domini": Resp. 5 2:34£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  6. Tenebrae, Feria V "In Coena Domini": Resp. 6 4:36£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  7. Tenebrae, Feria V "In Coena Domini": Resp. 7 4:45£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  8. Tenebrae, Feria V "In Coena Domini": Resp. 8 2:51£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  9. Tenebrae, Feria V "In Coena Domini": Resp. 9 4:55£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen10. Tenebrae, Feria VI "In Parasceve": Resp. 1 3:30£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen11. Tenebrae, Feria VI "In Parasceve": Resp. 2 2:58£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen12. Tenebrae, Feria VI "In Parasceve": Resp. 3 4:51£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen13. Tenebrae, Feria VI "In Parasceve": Resp. 4 3:09£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen14. Tenebrae, Feria VI "In Parasceve": Resp. 5 4:39£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen15. Tenebrae, Feria VI "In Parasceve": Resp. 6 6:36£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen16. Tenebrae, Feria VI "In Parasceve": Resp. 7 2:14£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen17. Tenebrae, Feria VI "In Parasceve": Resp. 8 3:32£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen18. Tenebrae, Feria VI "In Parasceve": Resp. 9 6:12£0.99  Buy MP3 


Disc 2:

Samples
Song Title Time Price
Listen  1. Tenebrae, Sabbato Sancto: Resp. 1 3:17£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  2. Tenebrae, Sabbato Sancto: Resp. 2 3:08£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  3. Tenebrae, Sabbato Sancto: Resp. 3 4:23£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  4. Tenebrae, Sabbato Sancto: Resp. 4 3:04£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  5. Tenebrae, Sabbato Sancto: Resp. 5 3:41£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  6. Tenebrae, Sabbato Sancto: Resp. 6 5:09£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  7. Tenebrae, Sabbato Sancto: Resp. 7 1:57£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  8. Tenebrae, Sabbato Sancto: Resp. 8 3:42£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  9. Tenebrae, Sabbato Sancto: Resp. 9 4:37£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen10. Benedictus 4:56£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen11. Miserere 9:05Album Only


Product Description

Amazon.co.uk

Vocal ensemble performance doesn't get any more technically polished or musically affecting than this offering from the Hilliard Ensemble--an example of what happens when a group of individual singers performs as a spiritual entity. Of course, the music--the liturgically solemn tenebrae responsories--makes a perfect medium for such a performance, but these works by late-16th/early 17th-century composer Carlo Gesualdo are notoriously difficult, owing to their unorthodox harmonic and melodic language. For this recording the Hilliards augmented the group's usual four male voices with three additional singers, countertenor, tenor, and bass, fully exploring and exploiting Gesualdo's rich tonal landscape while conveying the work's profound spirituality. The sonorities' effects are alternately chilling, unnerving, calming, and comforting. The sound is exemplary. --David Vernier

Product Description

I will ship by EMS or SAL items in stock in Japan. It is approximately 7-14days on delivery date. You wholeheartedly support customers as satisfactory. Thank you for you seeing it.

Customer Reviews

4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
5.0 out of 5 stars
5.0 out of 5 stars
Most Helpful Customer Reviews
15 of 15 people found the following review helpful
Format:Audio CD
The year 1611 saw the publication of Gesualdo's fifth and sixth Books of madrigals; the same year his last collection of sacred motets was also published. 'Responsoria et alia ad Officium Hebdonadae Sanctae spectantia' was composed for the Tenebrae service during Holy Week, when the Christian Church commemorates Christ's betrayal, death and burial on Maundy Thursday, Good Friday and Holy Saturday. Tenebrae means 'darkness'; the darkness of the church building as all but one of its lights are extinguished during the service, and the symbolic growing darkness of the world as 'Christ the Light of the World' is taken from us. It's an atmospheric service, a time of sorrow and solemn ritual. Gesualdo's reasons for setting these 27 responsories, plus a Benedictus and Miserere, were partly personal. Holy Week's themes of guilt, betrayal and redemption had special significance for him given his responsibility for the murder of his first wife after her infidelity, and this work provided a further opportunity to explore the trauma of his plight. It's this autobiographical undercurrent that heightens the dark atmosphere of the 'Responsoria', giving it a compelling edge as humility (his sincere desire for redemption) becomes entangled with self-pity and perhaps hubris (using Christ's suffering as a metaphor for his own private anguish). There certainly is a depth of feeling here, borne out by the emotional intensity of the music, which counteracts the argument put forward by some scholars that the tortured nature of Gesualdo's music is merely a mannerist pose.

The Hilliard Ensemble rise to the challenge of the Responsoria on 'Gesualdo: Tenebrae' demonstrating once again why they are one of the world's leading vocal ensembles.
Read more ›
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Deep Soul Music 29 April 2012
Format:Audio CD|Verified Purchase
This is a superb disc, recorded in 1991 by the Hilliards at their peak - though more than ten years on, they are still one of the finest vocal ensembles around. As always with ECM and the Hilliards, both the recording quality and the vocal performance are exquisite. This music arrived in my life at a time of great personal upheaval and sadness, and it brought me consolation. It finds its way right down into your soul, reaches the pockets of stored emotion and turns them inside out. It is both heartbreaking and uplifting in equal measure. I for one would not be without it.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
7 of 9 people found the following review helpful
Format:Audio CD
As ever fabulous sensitive singing with cutting tuning - a sonic special that give huge pleasure.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.8 out of 5 stars  12 reviews
68 of 73 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Awe-inspiring and terrifying 13 Jun 2005
By Sator - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
Don Carlo Gesualdo (1560 - 1613) was an aristocrat rich, artistic, and - as the second son of a noble Neapolitan family - free to indulge his passion for music. But when his eldest brother died, it was decreed that Don Carlo should carry on the line. The bride found for him - Donna Maria d'Avalos - was the greatest beauty in town. Don Carlo fathered a son, after which he lost interest in sex. But it still interested his wife. One day his uncle confided to him that she was involved in a torrent affair with the handsome Duke of Andria, in which they would "invite each other to battle on the fields of love". Alerted to the fact that Don Carlo now knew of their liaisons, the Duke tried to persuade Donna Maria to end the affair, but she proclaimed she would sooner die. Thus was the scene set for Don Carlo's historic act.

One day in October of 1590 he secretly disabled his locks, then set out to hunt only to sneek back with a gang of henchmen in the still of night. The chronicles detail what happened next: about the night-dress Donna Maria asked to be put out on the bed, about the maid posted as sentinel, and the commotion as Don Carlo and his men kicked in the door to find the pair "in flagrante delicto di fragrante peccato". About the shots and multiple sword-thrusts, and the way Don Carlo personally skewered his wife to the floor all the while repeating to himself "I do not believe she is dead". He dragged their bodies onto the stairs, for all the horrifed towns peope to gape at next morning, posting a notice explaining why he had killed them. The Duke was still clad in a woman's night-gown, while Donna Maria's "wounds were all in her belly, and especially in those parts which ought to be kept honest".

Don Carlo withdrew to his residence in Ferrra where his nobility ensured he escaped trial, only to find himself "afflicted by a vast horde of demons which gave him no peace unless twelve young men, whom he kept specially for the purpose, were to beat him violently three times a day, during which operation he was wont to smile joyfully."

Don Carlo built a private chapel, completed in 1592. Inside hung a painting depicting the Virgin Mary and saints all pointing to the sinner, Don Carlo, while the fires of purgatory burnt below - out of which angels pull the figures of a man and a woman. Could these be the murdered lovers before which Don Carlo implored forgiveness? His music became filled with an obession with themes of guilt, sin, pity, and death - even the joy of love being mixed with a fascination with pain: 'dolorosa gioia', such 'joyous pain' being a typical musical outburst.

Never has there been a composer with a more macabre background than this, nor yet so muscially so obsessionally fascinating.

Stravinsky began his famous foreword to Glenn Watkins' biography of Gesualdo with the words "musicians may yet save Gesualdo from musicologist, but certainly the latter have had the best of it until now". This recording of Gesualdo comes closest to saving him from the musicologists. The Hilliards fearlessly journey through the vertigo inducing chromatic spirals leading into the strange, visionary world of this dark genius - a world into which other ensembles fear to treat, instead resorting to a sanitization of the music to remove its sting - though who could blame them for wanting to? Particulary important is presence of the more harshly piecing tones of a counter-tenor in place female of sopranos, whose smooth dulcet tones rob the music of its visionary strangeness. Although the Hilliard Ensemble had been singing this music for decades, David James still said: "We don't sing it the way we sing most early music - we sing it as though it was contemporary. Even if you didn't know the facts, you'd still know it couldn't have been written by a completely sane man."

Tenerbrae means darkness, and the darkest ritual of the year suited Gesualdo tempermentally in which each candle is extinguished one by one leaving only one left burning in the darkness. Although his sacred works are less ostentatious in their chromaticisms and eccentricities than his madrigals, the power of his proto-Baroque declamatory writing coupled with the audacity of the writing is quite breathtaking to listen to.

This is an extraordinary - and absolutely essential - recording that delivers in full measure. The recorded sound really is superb and amongst the finest of a capella music as I have ever heard. It quite rightly won the deutschen Schallplattenkritik award.

Diego Fischerman wrote in Goldberg early music magazine that:

"the Hilliard Ensemble's recording (on this occasion the group is made up of the countertenors David James and Ashley Stafford, the tenors John Potter, Rogers Covey-Crump and Mark Padmore, the baritone Paul Hillier and the bass David Beavan) is truly unsurpassable, both in precision and dramatic intensity. The recording, made by the engineer Peter Laenger for ECM at Douai Abbey is outstanding for its realism and spatial conception."

Iain Fenlon in Gramophone magazine wrote that "these performances reveal a rare understanding of the inherent tensions of the music, both in terms of local detail and overall shape, and explicate them with great technical and musical artistry. I doubt that they could be bettered." I tend to agree and as the only complete recording available of the Tenebrae, this is my personal first choice, despite some stiff competition from A Sei Voci, the Taverner Consort, the Tallis Scholars and the King's Singers all recording only select parts.

These performaces ensure that the Gesualdo legend lives on.
26 of 26 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Expressive, powerful performances of mannerist master 5 Oct 2000
By Tobytime - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
Gesualdo, the master of late-Renaissance mannerism, is given a spectacular reading here, with the Hilliard Ensemble in full flower. The tightly-bent harmonies will have you squirming delightfully in your headphones. A word of advice: Listen to these alone, unless your friends and family enjoy sudden outbursts of harmonies you'll be tempted to try. Don't worry though: If you have any troubles, the rock-solid Hilliards will carry you through.
21 of 21 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Perfect for a Rainy Day 25 Mar 2005
By Jeffrey M. Bailey - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
This CD was my introduction to the music of Gesualdo. It has been written that Gesualdo was 300 years ahead of his time with his intricate and dissonant harmonies, and I have to agree. It is not a stretch of the imagination to place his music in the 1950s. The music perfectly matches the dreary Latin texts dealing with the betrayal and crucifixion of Christ. I defy anyone to hear CD#1, track 2, and not get chills at the words "et ego vadim". The accompanying booklet, although more poetic and less biographic, contains some beautiful, appropriate photographs which express the mood of the music perfectly.

Anyone familiar with the recordings of the Hilliards needs not be told of their rich harmonies and precise intonation-it just needs to be heard. My favorite aspect of this recording is the cavernous sound of the church, the reverberation in the hall brings a power to the 6-man group that one might expect from a 30 piece choir. I can imagine that this is the way it was heard 300 years ago.

Although the music of Gesualdo may not be to the taste of someone tentatively delving into the Renaissance for the first time, it may deepen the appreciation of this period more than the myriads of recordings of instrumental dances and part-songs ever will. Next rainy day, put this CD on, sit back, and relax. You will pray for more rain.
11 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Astonishing 16 April 1999
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
I really want to say something about this recording, but how can I express myself if I'm a total musical ignoramus? So I'm just going to copy & paste a Grammophone review that says it the way I never could:
"Historically there have been two quite different views about Gesualdo and his music. The first, now of such standing to be almost traditional, is that he was a tortured genius whose personal unhappiness is directly reflected in a musical language whose intensity of expression, largely achieved through unusual choral juxtapositions and bold chromatic detailing, is truly prophetic. Leaving aside the clearly ahistorical aspects of this account (Gesualdo foreshadowing Wagner), it sees the Prince of Venosa as a great composer, a musician of such power as to attract the attention of Stravinsky among others. The contrary, revisionist view stands in complete antithesis; here Gesualdo's strange harmonies are seen as limiting and exaggerated, the products of a modest ability that would have attracted little attention were it not for the notoriety of his private life and his privileged position in Italian society.
If any of Gesualdo's music can persuade the sceptics then it is surely this cycle of 27 Holy Week responsories, a coherent and stylistically convincing sequence of sustained beauty and vehemence. And although these works have been recorded a number of times previously, nothing can match the Hilliard's beautifully-structured and persuasive account. The overall sound is eloquently rich, with clear bright and seductively contoured upper voices underpinned by a firm, resonant bass line. It is the strength and careful articulation of the bass that is the key to the success of the Hilliard's deliberate and marked approach to the music; it functions as the motor of the style and permits the thoughtful presentation of the inner part-writing that is one of the many fine points of the interpretation. Allied to this attention to the complex gestural quality of the music is a rare grasp of the overall architecture of individual responsories. There is undoubtedly some truth in the criticism that some of the late madrigals fail to satisfy because of the heightened sense of disequilibrium, but the Tenebrae are controlled by contrast, and achieve this effect by careful alternations and repetitions of material. It is precisely through the rhetorical manipulation of repetition in, for example, the second responsory of the Feria quinta, that the music builds its emotional force, and the Hilliard's keen appreciation of this cumulative element of the piece pays handsome dividends. In short, these performances reveal a rare understanding of the inherent tensions of the music, both in terms of local detail and overall shape, and explicate them with great technical and musical artistry. I doubt that they could be bettered."
8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Awe-inspiring and terrifying 13 Jun 2005
By Sator - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
With these performaces the Gesualdo legend lives on.

Don Carlo Gesualdo (1560 - 1613) was rich, artistic, and - as the second son of a noble Neapolitan family - free to indulge his passion for music. But disaster struck: his brother died, and it was decreed that he must carry on the line. The bride found for him - Donna Maria d'Avalos - was his cousin, and the greatest beauty in town. Older and more experienced, she had already sent two husbands to their graves (one, it is rumoured, from "an excess of connubial bliss"). Don Carlo fathered a son, after which he lost interest in sex. But it still interested his wife: one day his uncle told him she was brazenly enjoying a rip-roaring affair with the handsome Duke of Andria, and that whenever possible they would "invite each other to battle on the fields of love", sometimes even in his house. Alerted to the fact that Don Carlo knew about the affair, the Duke tried to persuade Donna Maria that they must end the liaison, but she said she'd rather die. Thus was the scene set for Don Carlo's historic act.

One day in October of 1590 he surreptitiously disabled his locks, then accounced that he would go out to hunt. He set off, only to creep back with a gang of men. The chronicles go into salacious detail about what happened next: about the night-dress Donna Maria asked to be put out on the bed, about the maid posted as sentinel, and the sudden commotion as Don Carlo and his men burst in to find the pair "in flagrante delicto di fragrante peccato". About the shots and multiple sword-thrusts, and the way Don Carlo couldn't convince himself the job was done until he had cut his victims to ribbons, and he had personally skewered his wife to the floor. He dragged the bodies out onto the stairs, posted a notice explaining why he'd killed them, and all the town came to gape at them the next morning. The Duke was still clad in his night-dress, while his paramour's "wounds were all in her belly, and especially in those parts which ought to be kept honest".

Neapolitans were riveted, with as many taking the lovers' side as that of their murderer. All the local poets were spurred into song, including the great Torquato Tasso, whose friendship with the protagonists gaverise to his tear-drenched sonnet "On the Death of Two Most Noble Lovers". Don Carlo's nobility ensured there was no trial, and he quietly withdrew to Ferrara, where he remarried, but was by then "afflicted by a vast horde of demons which gave him no peace unless twelve young men, whom he kept specially for the purpose, were to beat him violently three times a day, during which operation he was wont to smile joyfully."

Don Carlo built a private chapel, completed in 1592. Inside hung a painting depicting the Virgin Mary and saints all pointing to the sinner, Don Carlo, while the fires of purgatory burnt below - out of which angels pull the figures of a man and a woman. Could these be the murdered lovers before which Don Carlo implored forgiveness? His music certainly becomes filled with an obession with themes of guilt, sin, pity, and death - even the joy of love being mixed with a fascination with pain: 'dolorosa gioia', such 'joyous pain' being a typical outburst.

Never has there been a composer with a more macabre background than this, nor yet so muscially so obsessionally fascinating.

Stravinsky began his famous foreword to Glenn Watkins' biography of Gesualdo with the words "musicians may yet save Gesualdo from musicologist, but certainly the latter have had the best of it until now". This recording of Gesualdo comes closest to saving him from the musicologists. The Hilliards fearlessly journey through the vertigo inducing chromatic spirals leading into the strange, visionary world of this dark genius - a world into which other ensembles fear to treat, instead resorting to a sanitisation of the music to remove its sting - though who could blame them for wanting to? Particulary important is presence of the more harshly piecing tones of a counter-tenor in place female of sopranos, whose smooth dulcet tones rob the music of its visionary strangeness. Although the Hilliard Ensemble had been singing this music for decades, David James still said: "We don't sing it the way we sing most early music - we sing it as though it was contemporary. Even if you didn't know the facts, you'd still know it couldn't have been written by a completely sane man."

This is an extraordinary - and absolutely essential - recording that delivers in full measure. The recorded sound really is superb and amongst the finest of a capella music as I have ever heard. I implore ECM to keep it readily available.
Were these reviews helpful?   Let us know
Search Customer Reviews
Only search this product's reviews

Customer Discussions

This product's forum
Discussion Replies Latest Post
No discussions yet

Ask questions, Share opinions, Gain insight
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 

Search Customer Discussions
Search all Amazon discussions
   


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Look for similar items by category


Feedback