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George Best Plus
 
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George Best Plus

1 Jan 1987 | Format: MP3

6.49 (VAT included if applicable)
Buy the CD album for 6.94 and get the MP3 version for FREE. Does not apply to gift orders.
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Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
1
4:09
30
2
2:43
30
3
2:43
30
4
3:33
30
5
2:22
30
6
1:43
30
7
4:14
30
8
2:06
30
9
3:50
30
10
3:25
30
11
2:45
30
12
3:20
30
13
3:18
30
14
2:12
30
15
4:01
30
16
4:25
30
17
3:02
30
18
4:06
30
19
2:35
30
20
2:37
30
21
2:53
30
22
2:07
30
23
2:34

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Product details

  • Label: Cooking Vinyl
  • Copyright: (c) 1987 1987 Cooking Vinyl
  • Total Length: 1:10:43
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B00AXDHN7W
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (19 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 20,135 in MP3 Albums (See Top 100 in MP3 Albums)

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

15 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Kevin Clarke on 17 Oct 2005
Format: Audio CD
David Gedge may have lacked the looks, charisma and downright strangeness of Morrissey but, for a time, his band The Wedding Present were The Smiths only serious rivals for the title of 'Kings of Bedsit Land.' Identifiably Northern, in the same way as Morrissey and Co, Gedge's flat singing and the hundred-mile-an-hour guitars mitigated against a broader appeal. That said, this album remains a classic of its kind, its kind being frantic, jangly, mid-80s indie pop.

Gedge could also turn a witty phrase or two. How about "At home she tells him little lies/Like onions always make her cry" or my favourite "You're not like anyone I've ever met....well, at least not yet." Twelve words that chart the trajectory of a love affair from initial starry-eyed romance to inevitable disappointment. "Ooh, he sounds like a right bastard!" said my then-girlfriend, with rather too much relish in her voice.

'Everyone Thinks He Looks Daft' will have you whistling its infectious tune a few bars in, 'A Million Miles' recalls the teenage excitement of meeting a new love at a party, and the sickening sadness of "Slowly your beauty is eaten away/By the scent of someone else, in the blankets where we lay" is the stand-out line from 'My Favourite Dress.'

On a more personal note, I also love it because someone with my name gets to play the cad in 'Give My Love To Kevin!'
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By bribeasy@tinyworld.co.uk on 7 Nov 1999
Format: Audio CD
Gedge is god.Or so I've seen it written in more than one internet chat room.The charismatic,angst ridden founder and leader of one of the best indie bands of the late 80's/early 90/s,certainly had some sort of divine inspiration when he penned this masterpiece.Every song is a tale of heartache,loss and longing that every adolescent can equate to.I know I did! Like songs with Gedge's ironic humour in the opening "Everyone thinks he looks daft" and "Give my love to Kevin" to the cynical third person look at broken relationships such as "Don't be so hard" there is a parallel that everone who takes the time to listen to this CD will recognize. But it's not just the lyrics to make the listener sit up and take note.Some of Gedge's vocal melodies are sublime,mixing well with Peter Solowka's thousand mile an hour guitar riffs and Keith Gregory's pounding bass lines. The Wedding Present were under-rated and under-achievers at a time when indie music was largely ignored by the music industry.This CD was a benchmark for the post-Smiths generation and should be given a chance if only for the classic "My Favourite Dress"
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Pete VINE VOICE on 30 May 2001
Format: Audio CD
The Wedding Present are a bit of an acquired taste, although it's an effort well worth making. This album, their first, consists of fairly simple noisy guitar riffs accompanying David Gedge's brilliantly simple and bitter lyrics about awkward snogs and heartless girlfriends.
There are some real classics here, although the album as a whole is quite an effort to get through for the beginner, more so because of the addition of nine extra songs at the end. These are worth the effort though, with old favourites Nobody's Twisting Your Arm and I'm Not Always So Stupid instantly likeable tunes; the highlight, however, is the French translation of Why Are You Being So Reasonable Now - get that accent!
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29 of 31 people found the following review helpful By Filthy the Dog on 25 July 2002
Format: Audio CD
When I look back on the late eighties it seemed to me that most of my "alternative" peers were into nothing else but the Smiths. Strangely, they weren't my cup of tea and I gravitated more toward the jingly angst-ridden vocals of the Wedding Present. Each song tells a story. Whether it be your ex copping off with somebody else (My Favourite Dress), your (female) mate having a bit of hassle with her arsehole boyfriend (Shatner) or merely the nightclub pursual of a young lady you've had your eye on for a while (A Million Miles) each song relates to some experience you've probably had sometime in your youth and beyond. While the Smiths spoke to the more pensive and whingey of my gloomy friends, I looked towards Dave Gedge and the boys for moral support and sympathy...and wore out the grooves on my vinyl copy.
A classic album, easily their best and now the expanded CD has the extra tracks that I previously desperately sought after on vinyl in Manchester's Piccadilly Records or Vinyl Exchange and never found. Nobody's Twisting Your Arm, Pourquoi est tu devenu si raisonable... Will the Ukranian folk songs be re-released now too? And what about Tommy?
Marvellous stuff. Even if all the songs do sound the same!! Well worth buying if you're into the Smiths years after the event - see what they were up against!
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Jonathan James Romley on 29 Feb 2008
Format: Audio CD
This was very much the Wedding Present in phase one of their career, fusing a C-86 style of indie-pop with references to the Undertones, the less-abrasive side of the Fall and, of course, the world of The Smiths. Later, they would tackle a more dissonant sound with albums like Bizarro and their masterpiece Seamonsters, which took the template of the great guitar-pop found here, but combined it with a more rigid and distorted sound that seemed to point more towards U.S. rock bands like Pavement, Sonic Youth and The Pixies.

George Best remains a great debut album and is probably the best place to start, allowing the listener to discover that classic 'Wedding Present' sound before the more adventurous music that would follow. The sound here is very mid-80's style indie, with the guitars chiming away in various layers of harmony, backed by a rhythmic percussion and a warm, fuzzy bass. The songs are topped off by singer/songwriter David Gedge's dry, northern vocals, which give a further degree of honesty to those lovesick, confessional lyrics. The album opens with the perfect guitar pop of Everyone Thinks He Looks Daft, which has a frantic acoustic melody and inter-weaving boy/girl vocals from Gedge and Amelia Fletcher, which really set this apart as a great track to open with. The lyrics are fantastic and give us a fair example of the conversational style that Gedge would perfect throughout subsequent Wedding Present albums, and also with his later band Cinerama, with the opening lyric "oh why do you catch my eye and then turn away" fitting in nicely alongside the musical integration of the acoustic and electric guitar.
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