Python Geospatial Development and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more


or
Sign in to turn on 1-Click ordering.
Trade in Yours
For a £2.00 Gift Card
Trade in
More Buying Choices
Have one to sell? Sell yours here
Sorry, this item is not available in
Image not available for
Colour:
Image not available

 
Start reading Python Geospatial Development on your Kindle in under a minute.

Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.

Python Geo-Spatial Development (Community Experience Distilled) [Paperback]

Erik Westra
5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
Price: £30.99 & FREE Delivery in the UK. Details
o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o
In stock.
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
Want it Thursday, 24 July? Choose Express delivery at checkout. Details

Formats

Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition £19.56  
Paperback £30.99  
Trade In this Item for up to £2.00
Trade in Python Geo-Spatial Development (Community Experience Distilled) for an Amazon Gift Card of up to £2.00, which you can then spend on millions of items across the site. Trade-in values may vary (terms apply). Learn more
There is a newer edition of this item:
Python Geospatial Development, Second Edition Python Geospatial Development, Second Edition
£30.99
In stock.

Book Description

16 Dec 2010 1849511543 978-1849511544
This is a tutorial style book that will teach usage of Python tools for GIS using simple practical examples and then show you how to build a complete mapping application from scratch. The book assumes basic knowledge of Python. No knowledge of Open Source GIS is required. This book is useful for Python developers who want to get up to speed with Open Source GIS in order to build GIS applications or integrate Geo-Spatial features into their applications.

Frequently Bought Together

Python Geo-Spatial Development (Community Experience Distilled) + PostGIS in Action
Price For Both: £62.98

Buy the selected items together
  • PostGIS in Action £31.99

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought


Product details

  • Paperback: 508 pages
  • Publisher: Packt Publishing (16 Dec 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1849511543
  • ISBN-13: 978-1849511544
  • Product Dimensions: 2.5 x 18.8 x 23.1 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 684,806 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Customer Reviews

4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
5.0 out of 5 stars
5.0 out of 5 stars
Most Helpful Customer Reviews
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
Format:Paperback
The book is divided into four main sections: the first introduces general GIS concepts, the second explains basic GIS operations in Python, the third shows how to use databases with geographic data and the fourth combines all of the previous information into two GIS web-apps. It is always difficult to work out what level to pitch this sort of book at - as a number of potential readers will already have experience with GIS (and are using the book to learn about doing GIS analysis in Python, like me), but some will be complete beginners who want to introduce map-based analysis into their applications. The first few chapters of this book are pitched nicely at a mid-point between these two reader groups: the author explains things clearly and precisely without seeming patronising. Although I already knew much of the basics, I found the section on projections and co-ordinate systems very useful as I had never properly understood these (I'd always seen the different options in software I was using for Projected Co-ordinate Systems and Geographic Co-ordinate Systems, but I never knew the difference until I read this book!).

The next section explains how to use a number of Python GIS libraries such as GDAL/OGR, PyProj, and Shapely. The author starts with a general description of the capabilities of each library, and continues with a `cookbook-style' approach showing how to do various tasks with these libraries. For example, instructions are given for how to convert projections and calculate Great Circle Distances with PyProj, how to extract shape geometries and attributes from shapefiles using OGR and how to do basic GIS analysis with Shapely.
Read more ›
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A solid starter and a fine reference 31 Dec 2010
Format:Paperback
Erik Westra did an excellent job here: delivering a book that is both comprehensive and easy to read. Of course you already need to know a bit of Python to start, but all topics are explained very well and the book is very hands-on and task oriented.

The integration of Google maps in almost everything from telephone directories to pizza ordering services and on-line news services shows that there is a huge appeal to providing relevant geographical information in all sorts of contexts. But where do you start if you want to develop such functionality in Python? This book is certainly an excellent starting point.

Erik covers basically any subject from necessary geometrical concepts like units, datums and projections, just to get you started, to where to get the needed Python libraries and more importantly where to source good basic data like maps, positions of cities, shapes of countries and shorelines, etc, preferably from free sources. As geographical information used to be hard to get and often expensive, this attention to data sources is a very valuable part of the book. I particularly liked his extensive coverage of the collaborative Open Streetmap project ([...]), an extensive source of geographical data collected by a host of people around the world.

With these resources at hand the next steps are directed to manipulating geospatial data and generating all sorts of maps. The storage of data in databases with specific geospatial extensions to handle large datasets is covered in depth with specific examples for PostGIS, MySQL ans Sqlite. Also the rendering of maps is explained in a detailed manner focusing on the Mapnik library ([...]).

The final part of the book is dedicated to developing a web application to work interactively with map data.
Read more ›
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Gets you started with python gis development 16 Jun 2011
By Ivor
Format:Paperback
This book covers GIS theory, python GIS libraries, tools, databases, datasources and web frameworks. It's focussed at getting an experienced developer started with GIS development in python. As such, it contains lots of code samples and gives you pointers for more in-depth documentation.

Even though there's a lot of python GIS documentation and tutorials on the web, this well-structured book is valuable because it brings the important information together in a concise way. I'll make sure new developers on my geo-projects read this first.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 3.3 out of 5 stars  7 reviews
25 of 27 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Superficial Coverage with Many Errors 28 Sep 2011
By Paul M. Carlisle - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
If you know nothing at all about geographic information systems, this book will probably teach you something. If you know even a little bit, you'll be disappointed.

First, a serious problem with the Kindle edition needs mention. The book is written using Python code almost exclusively. But the Kindle doesn't format this code properly. There is no indentation - crucial for Python both in terms of readability and syntactically. Reading through examples that are more than two or three lines long is painfully awkward; longer examples are impossible to follow. You can download most of the code, but the code as found in the Kindle edition is worse than worthless.

Coverage of topics is, at best, superficial. Most of the chapters claiming to provide background on the foundations of geospatial science are very weak, and consist of nothing more than a listing of tools and libraries, with web site addresses offered along with advice to go there for any actual information.

A disturbing number of the Python examples, even the short ones that don't suffer from the aforementioned formatting problems, contain gross errors and will not run as written. Function names are spelled incorrectly, scoping qualifiers are omitted where they are required or are simply wrong. Claims of the author's expertise with Python are questionable, given the low quality of the examples. A comparison between Python and C++ early on in the book, purporting to show Python's superiority, clearly demonstrates the author's lack of knowledge about C++ - the example is written in C - and the difference between a language and its support libraries.

Overall, you can gain far more knowledge on just about any geospatial topic with a few minutes worth of web searching than you ever will from reading this book. Spend your money elsewhere.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars a needed book, but not well presented 4 Oct 2012
By A. Max König - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
A book with this content, using Python, gdal, ogr and others for geoprocessing, really is needed. And this one seems to be the only one around at the moment. However, after working with it for quite a while now, I am just not happy how it is written.

Many things are simply presented without deeper explanations. With the help of google and other Python sources I have to work hard to understand details, which I expect to be explained within this book. It kind of presents what is possible to do with Python, but leaves the reader alone to work out the "how to" for himself. For example reading raster data with gdal. There is an example code to show what can be done. But more detailed explanations on how all this works are missing. The sub-chapter in chapter 3 called "reading and writing geospatial data" does not contain any information on how to write or save a raster array into a file (for example using gdal's "WriteArray")

So for me this is not good quality of teaching or explaining I am sorry to say.
13 of 18 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A solid starter and a fine reference 31 Dec 2010
By M. J. Anders - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
Erik Westra did an excellent job here: delivering a book that is both comprehensive and easy to read. Of course you already need to know a bit of Python to start, but all topics are explained very well and the book is very hands-on and task oriented.

The integration of Google maps in almost everything from telephone directories to pizza ordering services and on-line news services shows that there is a huge appeal to providing relevant geographical information in all sorts of contexts. But where do you start if you want to develop such functionality in Python? This book is certainly an excellent starting point.

Erik covers basically any subject from necessary geometrical concepts like units, datums and projections, just to get you started, to where to get the needed Python libraries and more importantly where to source good basic data like maps, positions of cities, shapes of countries and shorelines, etc, preferably from free sources. As geographical information used to be hard to get and often expensive, this attention to data sources is a very valuable part of the book. I particularly liked his extensive coverage of the collaborative Open Streetmap project ([...]), an extensive source of geographical data collected by a host of people around the world.

With these resources at hand the next steps are directed to manipulating geospatial data and generating all sorts of maps. The storage of data in databases with specific geospatial extensions to handle large datasets is covered in depth with specific examples for PostGIS, MySQL ans Sqlite. Also the rendering of maps is explained in a detailed manner focusing on the Mapnik library ([...]).

The final part of the book is dedicated to developing a web application to work interactively with map data. As performance is a key issue when working with large maps, even the implementation of a caching tile server (a server that generates small parts of a map on demand as you browse and zoom over the map) is implemented and explained in detail.

All in all a near perfect book for everybody who wants to start developing map based applications. Its solid coverage, excellent reference material and detailed explanations certainly make it a five out five for me.
6 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Not just for Python programmers 24 July 2011
By M. Henri De Feraudy - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
Last year I had a project in which I had to develop a GIS application.
I did it in Qt with C++. There is so much free software out there it was very hard to find the right api's and approach.
This book has arrived in the meantime and most of the Python libraries it refers to have their C++ counterpart, so the
book is also useful to C++ programmers.
I would have used MapNik as suggested by the book instead of developing my own map-drawing routines.
I would have also probably attempted a more ambitious project instead of what I did: for example I would have considered
a web application, as explained in the book.
I would have had a better understanding of spatial databases.
In short this book would have been a godsend.

Of course I might have been tempted to write the whole thing in Python, but either way this book is a tremendously helpful introduction to building your own GIS, but also to a lot of GIS concepts. The only niggle I have is that I think it could
explain the notion of datum a little better (but if you work your way through the book it sinks in anyway).

The author spends a fair deal of time explaining some of the traps in the field, or warning you about software that is badly documented.

This is an extremely useful book for someone who needs to build an application that is focused on some
features.
It starts off assuming you just know Python and you want to dive into GIS with no prior knowledge.
I cant think of anything that comes close to being that useful.
1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent All Round 22 May 2012
By john360 - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
I bought this book because it seemed most likely to answer my questions about how I might do simple spatial queries using open source code libraries with a mainstream language. This book is excellent for that and a huge amount besides. There is really a vast amount of material but if you persevere you will be have ability in web GIS beyond the basics. I do however think you need to be able to program with the core OO concepts to make best use of this. Unlike many IT books this one is concise and readable in my view.

With very little previous python experience, I managed to implement all of the examples including the full application at the end. Some of the libraries suggested (e.g. GDAL) appeared be difficult to use under a Windows 64 bit OS. I gave up and installed Ubuntu. There are a few editing errors in the code examples but I found that the text had guided me sufficiently in concepts and documentation sources so that working around was a little like end of chapter exercises. Being new to Django, I found that the last example in particular involved quite a few day's worth of work. Lastly, this is a book to give you all the building blocks you need - to build the fundemental building as it were but it stops there. It does not (could not) cover the finer points of using javascript, open layers, AJAX and so on to make the application sing and dance.

In summary, I would highly recommend this book if you want to build complete GIS applications on the web using open source code.
Were these reviews helpful?   Let us know
Search Customer Reviews
Only search this product's reviews

Customer Discussions

This product's forum
Discussion Replies Latest Post
No discussions yet

Ask questions, Share opinions, Gain insight
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 

Search Customer Discussions
Search all Amazon discussions
   


Look for similar items by category


Feedback