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  • Gentlemen Take Polaroids (Remastered)
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Gentlemen Take Polaroids (Remastered) Limited Edition, Original recording reissued, Original recording remastered


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Product details

  • Audio CD (15 Sept. 2003)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Limited Edition, Original recording reissued, Original recording remastered
  • Label: Virgin
  • ASIN: B0000AQOQS
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 304,039 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. Gentlemen Take Polaroids
2. Swing
3. Burning Bridges
4. My New Career
5. Methods of Dance
6. Ain't That Peculiar
7. Nightporter
8. Taking Islands in Africa
9. The Experience of Swimming
10. The Width of a Room
11. Taking Islands in Africa (Steve Nye Remix)

Product Description

JAPAN Gentlemen Take Polaroids (2003 issue UK 11-track digitally remastered PICTURE CD album including three bonus tracks - The Experience Of Swimming The Width Of A Room and Taking Islands In Africa [Steve Nye Remix]. Housed in a fold-out digipak picture sleeve CDVX2180)

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By E. Dolnack on 14 Nov. 2003
Format: Audio CD
David Sylvian and boys: thank you! This is a wonderful surprise for fans. I LOVE this album: "Gentlemen Take Poloroids" will always be my favourite Japan album, and this newly remastered CD is a treat.
Up until this new re-release, there has been a poorly mastered CD floating around, which is the only one available to us barbarians and cowboys living over here in the Colonies. I fell in love with this album in 1986, and it has remained a personal fav ever since.
There isn't much need be said that any of these other reviews haven't said well already. I will say a few choice things however: the title track has one of the longest sustains ending out of a song that I've ever heard - it's highly original and works incredibly well. "Aint That Peculiar" has one of the catchiest uses of syncopation I've ever heard. This band know rhythm like few other Brit New Wave acts did! The fretless bass playing of Mick Karn is some of the best bass that any muscian has ever put to record, and he's in rare form throughout "Gentlemen Take Poloroids".
In my opinion, the extra tracks that weren't originally on the vinyl LP are throwaway instrumentals for the most part, but I'd rather have them than not. The treat is the remix of "Taking Islands in Africa" one of my favourite Japan tracks.
I don't know what David Sylvian thinks about this record that he and his band made so long ago, but they should all be very proud! This CD has YET to receive even a fraction of all the praise it deserves on so many levels!
Thanks guys! We all owe you one for "Gentlemen Take Poloroids" - indeed, I can never fully repay the favor of all the joy this album has brought me throughout my life thus far.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Wills on 31 May 2004
Format: Audio CD
Just a short comment, I have owned this album since it was released way back when. I bought the CD as soon as it became available and will now buy this version. Twenty odd years ago it shone, and was IMHO a near perfect piece of vinyl as you were likely to find, in the arena of contemporary music. I still listen to it at least once a month today and although I know every nuance backwards it still sounds as fresh and as unique and as ethereal as it did the first time I heard it. The reason for that is it's completeness. Not a sound out of place, not a not too many or too few. Mick Karn's bass is incredibly fluid and varying (he couldn't read music at the time and was self taught) Steve Jansens drums propelled the album along beautifully. Every track is a gem, no filler here. Nightporter is reminiscent of Eric Satie's Trois Gynopedies, but it stands up well in it's own right. Apart from the superb performances and production it's also a homage to a golden era in electronic music. It stands at a crossroads; analogue synths were the best they would ever be in terms of sounds and digital synths were only a year or so away. Many would agree that the sounds an old Prophet 5 or Oberheim could make after a fair bit of knob twiddling was far more ear pleasing than even synths available today. Hence why these machines fetch such good money nowadays.
Polaroids is the epitome of what these "old" machines were capable of in the right hands, and with Japan they were defintely in the right hands. The album is timeless and is still growing on me nearly 25 years later!
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By "campdavid8" on 30 Sept. 2003
Format: Audio CD
Originally released twenty-three years back, Gentlemen Take Polaroids has remained a sparkling pop album.
Now, in its re-mastered form, it shines like a diamond.
Mixing deep melancholy (Nightporter) with what actually had been Electroclash long before the term was coined (Taking Islands In Africa) - and stomping jazz-tinted extravaganza (Swing), David Sylvian and his partners prove that the 1980s were not all Pet Shop Boys, New Order, and The Smiths. Japan's combination of gloom, sheen and gorgeously elegant camp stood out back then and it most certainly will for years to come.
Produced by the improbably sensitive John Punter, Gentlemen Take Polaroids is a flawless gem.
A special treat for fans are three extra tracks that include a Steve Nye remix of Taking Islands In Africa.
Pawel Lopatka, Krakow, Poland
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By S. C. Trump on 7 April 2006
Format: Audio CD
I first got into Japan with an ex-girlfriend in the early 80s. I had all their albums but when we split up, as you do I distanced myself from most things that she had introduced me to except for this one Japan album which I still find excellent listening some 20 years later.
'Gentlemen take Polaroids' is the opening title track. Released as a single it did not do too well but it's a sumptuous piece of mid-tempo traditionally structured tune. The track has one of the longest fade-outs I've ever heard with David Sylvians gentle 'oohs' and 'aahs' accompanying the gradual disappearance. You would think that the chances of the line 'taking Islands in Africa' appearing in a song were slight; a lot less likely than say 'I really love you yes I do'.... However the line duly appears twice on this album, the first time being on the second track simply entitled 'Swing'. A very oriental sound leaning heavily towards the bands next album 'Tin Drum' with an interesting rhythm line and those oh so juicy bass licks from Mick Karn. What's next is 'Burning Bridges' which for me is the albums weak point. Originally a song called 'Some kind of fool' was intended to be in this slot but was dropped for 'Burning Bridges' and why I just don't know as the song is an elongated workout for Richard Barberis keyboards and synths and a belated vocal entry from Sylvian. The original side one closes with the shortest track on the album 'My new career' and it's one of those understated tracks that is a real high point.
The original albums side two opened with two magnificent tracks. The first, 'Methods of Dance' is a lively saxophone based up-tempo track which features some evocative female vocals from an uncredited lady.
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