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A Generous Orthodoxy: By celebrating strengths of many traditions in the church (and beyond), this book will seek to communicate a "generous orthodoxy." (emergentYS)
 
 

A Generous Orthodoxy: By celebrating strengths of many traditions in the church (and beyond), this book will seek to communicate a "generous orthodoxy." (emergentYS) [Kindle Edition]

Brian D. McLaren
4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (25 customer reviews)

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Product Description

Product Description

A confession and manifesto from a senior leader in the emerging church movement. A Generous Orthodoxy calls for a radical, Christ-centered orthodoxy of faith and practice in a missional, generous spirit. Brian McLaren argues for a post-liberal, post-conservative, post-protestant convergence, which will stimulate lively interest and global conversation among thoughtful Christians from all traditions.

In a sweeping exploration of belief, author Brian McLaren takes us across the landscape of faith, envisioning an orthodoxy that aims for Jesus, is driven by love, and is defined by missional intent. A Generous Orthodoxy rediscovers the mysterious and compelling ways that Jesus can be embraced across the entire Christian horizon. Rather than establishing what is and is not “orthodox,” McLaren walks through the many traditions of faith, bringing to the center a way of life that draws us closer to Christ and to each other. Whether you find yourself inside, outside, or somewhere on the fringe of Christianity, A Generous Orthodoxy draws you toward a way of living that looks beyond the “us/them” paradigm to the blessed and ancient paradox of “we.”

Synopsis

A confession and manifesto from a senior leader in the emerging church movement--A Generous Orthodoxy calls for a radical, Christ-centered orthodoxy of faith and practice in a missional, generous spirit. Brian McLaren argues for a post-liberal, post-conservative, post-protestant convergence, which will stimulate lively interest and global conversation among thoughtful Christians from all traditions. In a sweeping exploration of belief, author Brian McLaren takes us across the landscape of faith, envisioning an orthodoxy that aims for Jesus, is driven by love, and is defined by missional intent. A Generous Orthodoxy rediscovers the mysterious and compelling ways that Jesus can be embraced across the entire Christian horizon. Rather than establishing what is and is not "orthodox," McLaren walks through the many traditions of faith, bringing to the center a way of life that draws us closer to Christ and to each other. Whether you find yourself inside, outside, or somewhere on the fringe of Christianity, A Generous Orthodoxy draws you toward a way of living that looks beyond the "us/them" paradigm to the blessed and ancient paradox of "we."

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 1207 KB
  • Print Length: 352 pages
  • Page Numbers Source ISBN: 0310257476
  • Simultaneous Device Usage: Up to 5 simultaneous devices, per publisher limits
  • Publisher: Zondervan/Youth Specialties (18 May 2009)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B000MAHCKO
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (25 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #114,861 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews
49 of 52 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Stirring up the Waters of Faith 21 Sep 2005
Format:Hardcover|Verified Purchase
There's no doubt that McLaren is controversial, especially in the Christian community in his home country. They see him as a stirrer, someone making trouble, leading the church to the edge of spiritual bankruptcy, holding out a dangerous and relativistic message. "God is for you, so it doesn't really matter what you believe". For sure, it's a pretty hollow charicature.
On the other hand, McLaren really is a stirrer - in the same way that fish die in an aquarium where the water is not oxygenated, the author understands that there is a type of stagnancy in much modern Christian thinking. All the important questions are perceived to have been asked, the answers have ben provided, so it's really just a question of who's in and who's out. And of course, if you are a protestant evangelical, the chances are that your particular tradition has had up to 500 years to define exactly who is out, with ever increasing degrees of theological hair-splitting.
McLaren's key thought is that removing the message of Jesus from the constraints of a modern worldview and allowing it to breathe again in the relatively unconstrained emerging postmodern culture, allows for a deeper and better understanding of what it means to live collectively as Christians.
Or to put it another way, Christians have spent so long worrying about the purity of our beliefs, the quality of our Orthodoxy, that we have in many instances become sub-Christian, in that we have forgotten HOW we must put our beliefs into action (Orthopraxy). The New Testament was written decades after the death of Jesus and is in many ways, the theology that emerged after reflecting on the mission that had happened. But somehow it has become a flat, historical record of detached 'truth' used to identify and judge outsiders.
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26 of 28 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An excellent vision of a Christian orthodoxy 29 Feb 2008
By Helen Hancox TOP 500 REVIEWER
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
I absolutely loved Brian McLaren's "A New Kind of Christian", a book that opened up a whole new world for me of possibilities of staying within the Christian faith, something on which I had almost given up. Rob Bell's "Velvet Elvis", in a different way, did the same. So I approached this next book by McLaren feeling exceptionally positive towards him and his writing.

I wasn't disappointed. However this book is very different than "A New Kind of Christian". Once you get past the amusingly-titled but a little wordy Chapter 0 McLaren goes on a tour through different denominations and styles within Christianity, highlighting the good points about them (as well as looking at the bad), showing what we can all learn from this part of the church, and taking those good parts in order to build them into a new 'generous' orthodoxy. It's a great idea and it's also good to read a book which is very positive about so many denominations.

Of course there are the negatives, and Brian says that he is from a particular part of the church and so perhaps he gives them a harder time (the conservative evangelical/fundamentalist wing). As this coincides very much with how I feel about that branch of Christianity that's no problem for me but I suppose readers from that tradition might find it uncomfortable reading at times. We're left in no doubt that McLaren is not a big fan of televangelists but he is a strong supporter of the green movement, that he is learning more to value the Roman catholic and Anglican ideas about liturgy and the mystical side of the church.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An excellent vision of a Christian orthodoxy 29 Sep 2007
By Helen Hancox TOP 500 REVIEWER
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
I absolutely loved Brian McLaren's "A New Kind of Christian", a book that opened up a whole new world for me of possibilities of staying within the Christian faith, something on which I had almost given up. Rob Bell's "Velvet Elvis", in a different way, did the same. So I approached this next book by McLaren feeling exceptionally positive towards him and his writing.

I wasn't disappointed. However this book is very different than "A New Kind of Christian". Once you get past the amusingly-titled but a little wordy Chapter 0 McLaren goes on a tour through different denominations and styles within Christianity, highlighting the good points about them (as well as looking at the bad), showing what we can all learn from this part of the church, and taking those good parts in order to build them into a new 'generous' orthodoxy. It's a great idea and it's also good to read a book which is very positive about so many denominations.

Of course there are the negatives, and Brian says that he is from a particular part of the church and so perhaps he gives them a harder time (the conservative evangelical/fundamentalist wing). As this coincides very much with how I feel about that branch of Christianity that's no problem for me but I suppose readers from that tradition might find it uncomfortable reading at times. We're left in no doubt that McLaren is not a big fan of televangelists but he is a strong supporter of the green movement, that he is learning more to value the Roman catholic and Anglican ideas about liturgy and the mystical side of the church.
Read more ›
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Most Recent Customer Reviews
5.0 out of 5 stars Another excellent book by McLaren
Another excellent book by McLaren. I wish all Christians would read this book - it might lead to less conflict and more understanding.
Published 1 month ago by C J Barr
5.0 out of 5 stars A necessary challenge for all Christians
I guess its unfair to give something a five star rating because it expresses one's own opinion! The views in this book I find liberating because although I have been thinking... Read more
Published 6 months ago by K. HOOK
5.0 out of 5 stars Essential reading!
This is a book that all evangelical Christians should read. You may not agree with everything - it's quite provocative at times - but if only we were more geneous in listening to... Read more
Published 19 months ago by Stephen
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent overview of emerging church
The author takes the various strands of Christian practice and points out value in each area. I found it excellent for opening up my visions of church and faith and for seeing new... Read more
Published on 28 Aug 2009 by A reader and music fan
1.0 out of 5 stars Organic composting
Rather than have a second hand opinion of Brian I felt I should buy this book. The foreward by Phyllis Tickle (who is she?) equating Brian Mclaren with Martin Luther(I know him! Read more
Published on 11 Aug 2009 by Andrew Price
4.0 out of 5 stars A brave attempt
Mclaren makes a valiant and partially successful effort to think outside the evangelical box (most notably) in a fair and thoughtful way. His style grates occasionally. Read more
Published on 13 July 2009 by C. R. Moore
2.0 out of 5 stars Not my choice, but interesting in places.
I have been reading this book as a required text for a theology degree that I am studying. Although there are some interesting chapters, it is not a book I would have chosen to... Read more
Published on 19 Oct 2008 by Amazon Customer
5.0 out of 5 stars Read it
This is a well written, enlightening and challenging read.

I don't agree with all that Brian says, then again he tells us that he probably won't agree with it all in a... Read more
Published on 2 Mar 2008 by Mr. A. J. Thomas
3.0 out of 5 stars Laudable but overambitious
I very much `get' what Brian McLaren is trying to do with this book, and welcome it. It's a wonderfully postmodern attempt to pick up on all manner of strands of the Christian... Read more
Published on 20 Oct 2007 by Jeremy Bevan
5.0 out of 5 stars An excellent vision of a Christian orthodoxy
I absolutely loved Brian McLaren's "A New Kind of Christian", a book that opened up a whole new world for me of possibilities of staying within the Christian faith, something on... Read more
Published on 29 Sep 2007 by Helen Hancox
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