The Wild Geese (Tuttle Classics) and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
FREE Delivery in the UK.
Only 2 left in stock.
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Wild Geese (Tuttle Classi... has been added to your Basket
+ £2.80 UK delivery
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by castlebookstore
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Perfect, unmarked and undamaged. UK seller posting within 24 hours of sale, sooner if possible.
Trade in your item
Get a £0.50
Gift Card.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Wild Geese (Tuttle Classics of Japanese Literature) Paperback – 1 Aug 2009

4 customer reviews

See all 8 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
£14.50
£4.35 £4.58
£14.50 FREE Delivery in the UK. Only 2 left in stock. Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Special Offers and Product Promotions

  • Win a £5,000 Amazon.co.uk Gift Card for your child's school by voting for their favourite book. Learn more.
  • Prepare for the summer with our pick of the best selection for children (ages 0 - 12) across Amazon.co.uk.

Frequently Bought Together

Wild Geese (Tuttle Classics of Japanese Literature) + Kokoro + Snow Country (Penguin Modern Classics)
Price For All Three: £27.19

Buy the selected items together


Win a £5,000 Amazon.co.uk Gift Card and 30 Kindle E-readers for your child or pupil's school.
Vote for your child or pupil(s) favourite book(s) here to be in with a chance to win.

Product details

  • Paperback: 160 pages
  • Publisher: Tuttle Shokai Inc; 2nd Revised edition edition (1 Aug. 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 4805308842
  • ISBN-13: 978-4805308844
  • Product Dimensions: 13 x 1.3 x 20.3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 965,929 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

Synopsis

In "The Wild Geese" the young heroine Otama is surrounded by skilfully-drawn characters. Her weak-willed father, her virile and calculating lover (and his suspicious wife), and the handsome student who is both the object of her desire and the symbol of her rescue-as well as a colourful procession of Meiji era figures-geisha, students, entertainers, unscrupulous matchmakers, shopkeepers, and greedy landladies. Her dawning consciousness of her predicament brings the novel to a touching climax.

Inside This Book

(Learn More)
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By DRFP on 8 Jan. 2012
Format: Paperback
Ogai is often mentioned as one of the pre-eminent Meiji authors alongside Natsume S'seki. If that's truly the case then "The Wild Geese" doesn't do him justice as it's not a patch on Soseki's best.

Perhaps a lot of this is down to the translation, which isn't the best. For instance, at one point we're told that Otama's father felt that losing his daughter to a scary looking policeman was, "like having her carried off by a monster with a long nose and a red face." That's a very awkward sentence and to anyone in the know (admittedly far from everybody) that quote obviously describes a Tengu. Why the translators didn't just use an appropriate word like "demon" instead of giving a literal description of a Tengu, I don't know. It seems awfully clumsy and I can't believe that's how it was written originally in the Japanese. There are other minor issues with the translation - such as the way honorifics are denoted - that grate as well although I realise this is only noticeable to someone more familiar with Japanese culture. Regardless, it would be nice to see a decent translation one day (I know the translation Tuttle use for "Botchan" is another awful disservice).

The story itself is fine but feels rather lightweight. Little takes place in the novel, which is fine, but it all feels so inconsequential in a way that the minor events of, say, Soseki's "Sanshiro" don't. The characters and story take a while to get going and then it ends quite suddenly. The lack of neat resolution may be part of the point but it all feels rather abrupt.

It all left me wondering why Ogai is thought of in such high regard. Given that few of his works are easily available in translation one would expect what is available to be among his best work; either this translation is very poor or that's simply not the case.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Kurt A. Johnson on 4 Dec. 2003
Format: Paperback
This is a tale of complex people who in their interaction find life to be much more complicated than they had expected or feared. Suezo, a moneylender, is tired of life with his nagging, highly imperfect wife, so he decides to take a mistress. Otama, the only child of a widower merchant, wishes that she could provide for her aging father, and when an obviously rich man asks her to be his mistress, a new hope beckons. When Otama learns the truth about Suezo, she feels betrayed, and hopes to find a hero to rescue her. When Otama meets Okada, a medical student, she feels that she might indeed have met her hero.
This is a bittersweet story, a story of hope and unfairness. The wild geese wish only for freedom, but sometimes others use them for purposes they cannot imagine. Published between 1911 and 1913, this book gives an excellent peek into the society of early modern Japan.
This book is an achingly beautiful story, and a fascinating historical document. I highly recommend it.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 10 July 2001
Format: Paperback
Ogai's terse structure and gentle lyricism skillfully reflect the narrative focus on particularly Japanese dichotomies of controlled communication and emotional freedom, discernible form and unanticipated change. No word of this beautiful translation is unnecessary and retains the subtle tensions of the original - particularly gratifying in a novel which deals with impression and the implied more than with event. This is a beautiful edition of an important work.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By J. Balls on 23 Mar. 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I needed the book for exam marking purposes. It was excellent
to receive it so promptly - just what was needed.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 7 reviews
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Achingly beautiful 6 Oct. 2013
By Kurt A. Johnson - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This is a tale of complex people who in their interaction find life to be much more complicated than they had expected or feared. Suezo, a moneylender, is tired of life with his nagging, highly imperfect wife, so he decides to take a mistress. Otama, the only child of a widower merchant, wishes that she could provide for her aging father, and when an obviously rich man asks her to be his mistress, a new hope beckons. When Otama learns the truth about Suezo, she feels betrayed, and hopes to find a hero to rescue her. When Otama meets Okada, a medical student, she feels that she might indeed have met her hero.

This is a bittersweet story, a story of hope and unfairness. The wild geese wish only for freedom, but sometimes others use them for purposes they cannot imagine. Published between 1911 and 1913, this book gives an excellent peek into the society of early modern Japan.

This book is an achingly beautiful story, and a fascinating historical document. I highly recommend it.
Dull soap opera, you will not learn much about life and times of Japan 1880. 10 Jun. 2015
By See Em Gee - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Well written but dull. When I read various reviews and description of the book I formed the opinion that I would like reading this book, even the introduction makes it sound like this wonderful piece of literature where we discover how people lived in 1880 through a variety of characters. Not so. This is mostly the interchange between a man and his wife, him lying about his mistress. I found the most interesting characters, the two young men only at the beginning and ending of the book. I was sadly disappointed to NOT learn about living conditions, societal norms, dress, businesses, etc. just a mundane he said she said. If you want to learn about Japan, this is not recommended. I do read a lot of such material and this was severely lacking in what I wanted to know.
7 of 11 people found the following review helpful
The coflict between love and surperstition!! 3 Oct. 2000
By koske kawasaki - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This love story of a girl who became a lover of an old bill collecter and fall in love with a medical student is a sign of japanese mentality in the drastic changing situation between the periode "Edo" and periode "Meiji". As his first novel "Dancer"in wich he told his uncompleated love in Germany(at that time,having a foreign wife was a taboo), Mori tried to show the example of a conflict of natural feeling of love and the traditional superstition.Why the girl could not acheave her love? In Japan they said that a real love is a love forbidden, but it is sure that what Mori wanted to say in this book is not that beauty.
Important book for those interested in Japanese literature 14 Jan. 2015
By Barbara B. Levinson - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
perfect book for an Asian Art Museum, SF docent hoping to learn more about Japanese literature and life during the early 20th C.
0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Lovely and Enigmatic 4 Dec. 2011
By Sugarbeaches - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
In The Wild Geese, a tale set in the thirteenth year of Emperor Meiji's reign, an invisible narrator introduces the reader to the handsome Okada, a handsome medical student. During his regular walks through the city he becomes enchanted by an "oval and somewhat lonely" face that smiles at him each day from a window. That face belongs to Otama, the mistress of Suezo, a vain, parsimonious moneylender. Otama's only friend is her weak father, who depends upon her for support.
One day a snake slithers into Otama's birdcage and snatches one bird fast in its jaws, while the other bird flails to escape. Okada slices the snake apart and saves the remaining bird. Otama herself is the caged bird, Mori implies; the snake not just Suezo, or her ineffectual father, but the patriarchy that traps her. Mori drives the point home when Okada kills a wild goose in a lake. Otama was infatuated by Okada's freedom to do whatever he wished. Otama's wings were crushed before she could use them, while Okada flew away.
Otama formulates a plan to meet Okada, but it backfires, and Okada leaves the country the next day. The narrator called Okada the "hero" of the story, but Okada was a man who felt "a woman should be only a beautiful object, something lovable, a being who keeps her beauty and loveliness no matter what situation she is in." . The two never meet; or, do they? The author suggests there is more to the story, yet refuses to reveal the ending. The Wild Geese is full of allusions and hints, painting a watercolor tale as lovely and enigmatic as Japan herself.
Were these reviews helpful? Let us know

Look for similar items by category


Feedback