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Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak (Routledge Critical Thinkers) [Hardcover]

Stephen Morton
4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
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Book Description

24 Oct 2002 Routledge Critical Thinkers
Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak offers an overtly political challenge to the way we think about literature and culture. As she highlights the many legacies of colonialism, she re-defines the ethical horizons of contemporary critical thought. This volume focuses on her key theoretical concepts, intellectual context and critical reception, providing an accessible introduction to one of the most important thinkers of our time.
Stephen Morton introduces Spivak's crucial work through an analysis of such issues as:
* methodology and Spivak's 'difficult' style
* deconstructive strategies
* third world women, the concept of the 'subaltern' and the critique of western feminism
* re-reading Marx for the global capitalist era
* Spivak's contribution to colonial discourse studies and postcolonial theory.
Having examined the ways in which Spivak has transformed contemporary cultural theory, and in particular feminist and postcolonial thought, Morton concludes with a guide to reading Spivak's work and that of her critics. Essential for students of literature or cultural studies, this volume is the ideal companion for a first encounter with Spivak's remarkable texts.


Product details

  • Hardcover: 192 pages
  • Publisher: Routledge (24 Oct 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0415229340
  • ISBN-13: 978-0415229340
  • Product Dimensions: 14 x 20 x 2 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 3,718,149 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

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Review

'This is a provocative book of fundamental significance.' - Transaction

'Marcuse shows himself to be one of the most radical and forceful thinkers of his time.' - The Nation

About the Author

Stephen Morton is Lecturer in English at Tampere University, Finland.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
First Sentence
Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak is best known for her overtly political use of contemporary cultural and critical theories to challenge the legacy of colonialism on the way we read and think about literature and culture. Read the first page
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A fair and systematic introduction 1 Nov 2002
By A Customer
Format:Paperback
This is the first real attempt (bar the 'reader') to present Spivak's key ideas and interventions in a consise and clear manner. Despite Spivak's own warning that 'we know plain prose cheats' and the usual problems of summarising significant critical work (which by no means is unique to the field of 'post-colonial' studies) Morton has done a good job.
The most interesting sections of this book are on the political application of deconstruction and Spivak's rereading of Marx so not to preclude the poorest women of the 'Third World'. This is unsurprising as these are also the most interesting elements of essays like 'Scattered speculations on the question of value' and 'Setting to work of deconstruction' - which I think are of much more importance that 'Can the subaltern speak?'.
The central ideas and focus of these essays is well engaged with in this book and the essays made quite accessable to anyone new to Spivak's work.
What did strike me by reading this survey was how much a lot of what Spivak talks about regarding 'colonial discourse and literary texts', 'Third World women and Western feminism' and 'learning from below' is taken up in a completely comprehensive and immediately 'understandable' manner by other feminists and activists - Leila Ahmed, Sara Suleri, Katharine Viner, Naila Kabeer - even people like Epifanio San Juan Jr! I suppose that Spivak, writing in the 80s, was the one of the first to write on these subjects though. Her most recent speech on 'Terror' though is a case in point. Morton relays her point as suggesting "that terror is the name given to the flip side of social movements against the legitimised terror of the State, and it is perhaps no more than an antonym for war" p140- read Chomsky, Albert, Said, Pilger!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Postcolonial thought in a new key 18 Oct 2005
By Kurt Messick HALL OF FAME
Format:Paperback
Stephen Morton's text on Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak is part of a recent series put out by the Routledge Press, designed under the general editorial direction of Robert Eaglestone (Royal Holloway, University of London), to explore the most recent and exciting ideas in intellectual development during the past century or so. To this end, figures such as Martin Heidegger, Sigmund Freud, Michel Foucault, Jean-Francios Lyotard, Jacques Derrida, Paul Ricouer, Friedrich Nietzsche and other influential thinkers in critical thought are highlighted in the series, planned to include more than 21 volumes in all.
Morton's text, following the pattern of the others, includes background information on Spivak and his significance, the key ideas and sources, and Spivak's continuing impact on other thinkers. As the series preface indicates, no critical thinker arises in a vacuum, so the context, influences and broader cultural environment are all important as a part of the study, something with which Nietzsche (one of the thinkers highlighted in this series) might have some argument.
Why is Spivak included in this series? Spivak is less well known in comparison with some of the thinkers in this series, but her impact in modern critical thinking has gone far beyond narrow intellectual confines to influence in many fields impacted with the thinking of the postmodern world; these include psychology, politics, literature, sociology, philosophy, linguistics, history and anthropology. The idea of postcolonial issues continues as a primary force in cultures that have long since gained political autonomy, because of the long-standing legacies imposed upon such cultures.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A useful introduction to Spivak 18 Oct 2005
By FrKurt Messick - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
Stephen Morton's text on Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak is part of a recent series put out by the Routledge Press, designed under the general editorial direction of Robert Eaglestone (Royal Holloway, University of London), to explore the most recent and exciting ideas in intellectual development during the past century or so. To this end, figures such as Martin Heidegger, Sigmund Freud, Michel Foucault, Jean-Francios Lyotard, Jacques Derrida, Paul Ricouer, Friedrich Nietzsche and other influential thinkers in critical thought are highlighted in the series, planned to include more than 21 volumes in all.

Morton's text, following the pattern of the others, includes background information on Spivak and his significance, the key ideas and sources, and Spivak's continuing impact on other thinkers. As the series preface indicates, no critical thinker arises in a vacuum, so the context, influences and broader cultural environment are all important as a part of the study, something with which Nietzsche (one of the thinkers highlighted in this series) might have some argument.

Why is Spivak included in this series? Spivak is less well known in comparison with some of the thinkers in this series, but her impact in modern critical thinking has gone far beyond narrow intellectual confines to influence in many fields impacted with the thinking of the postmodern world; these include psychology, politics, literature, sociology, philosophy, linguistics, history and anthropology. The idea of postcolonial issues continues as a primary force in cultures that have long since gained political autonomy, because of the long-standing legacies imposed upon such cultures.

For example, Spivak recognizes the situation of irony in that she is product of the English-speaking, post-colonial situation in India, and now lives and teaches in the United States. However, her situation is also informed by the failure of the Indian socialism to deal the issues of women's equality, the underclass, and issues of tribalism and rural poverty. Spivak was heavily influenced by the major critical thinkers, particularly Derrida and de Man (Paul de Man was her dissertation director).

Key ideas that Morton highlights start with Theory, politics and the question of style. Spivak is very much different from another major thinker in post-colonial theory, Edward Said, in that she looks for contemporary literary theory to help reveal, rather than obscure, social and political relationships. In terms of deconstructionism, Spivak sees the ethical imperative to move this concept beyond academia and literary circles into socio-economic and political realms. In dealing with the Subaltern, the underclasses and less privileged people, she reworks the Marxist framework to look at histories that take a broader community into account - in particular, 'third world' women, one of the least visible and audible groups of people in the world. Morton also develops chapters on Spivak's idea of materialism, as well as her work on colonial and post-colonial issues in a specifically literary context.

One of the useful features of the text is the side-bar boxes inserted at various points. For example, during the discussion on Spivak's development of 'third world' women and Western feminist thought, there are brief discussions, set apart from the primary strand of the text, on the issues of essentialism, strategic essentialism, developing further these ideas should the reader not be familiar with them, or at least not in the way with which Spivak would be working with ideas derived from it. There are also brief boxes on Marx, Derrida and others, giving insight into key ideas from these thinkers as they relate to Spivak. Each section on a key idea spans approximately twenty pages, with a brief summary concluding each, which gives a recap of the ideas (and provides a handy reference).

The concluding chapter, After Spivak, highlights some key areas of development in relation to other thinkers, as well as points of possible exploration for the reader. Morton traces the influence of Spivak according to several areas: the future of postcolonial theory; how Marxist thought exists after Spivak; the ideas of transnational feminism in Butler, Alexander and Mohanty; and the idea of reading the subaltern in Parry, Varadharajan, Moore-Gilbert, and Bellamy.

As do the other volumes in this series, Morton concludes with an annotated bibliography of works by Spivak, and works on Lyotard by principal scholars. He also includes an internet resources link and a useful index.

While this series focuses intentionally upon critical literary theory and cultural studies, in fact this is only the starting point. As intellectual endeavours of every sort depend upon language, understanding, and interpretation, the thorough comprehension of how and why we know what we know is crucial.
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