Garment of Shadows and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £10.
Only 6 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Garment of Shadows (Mary ... has been added to your Basket
FREE Delivery on orders over £10.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Over 2 million items sold. Fast dispatch and delivery. Excellent Customer Feedback. Most items will be dispatched the same or the next working day.
Trade in your item
Get a £1.16
Gift Card.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Garment of Shadows (Mary Russell & Sherlock Holmes) Paperback – 24 Jun 2013


See all 14 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
£7.99
£4.16 £4.48

Frequently Bought Together

Garment of Shadows (Mary Russell & Sherlock Holmes) + Pirate King (Mary Russell & Sherlock Holmes) + God of the Hive, The (Mary Russell Mystery 10)
Price For All Three: £23.97

Buy the selected items together


Trade In this Item for up to £1.16
Trade in Garment of Shadows (Mary Russell & Sherlock Holmes) for an Amazon Gift Card of up to £1.16, which you can then spend on millions of items across the site. Trade-in values may vary (terms apply). Learn more

Product details

  • Paperback: 350 pages
  • Publisher: ALLISON & BUSBY (24 Jun. 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 074901377X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0749013776
  • Product Dimensions: 19.7 x 2.6 x 12.9 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (25 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 46,964 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

Review

'The most sustained feat of imagination in mystery fiction today' Lee Child

About the Author

LAURIE R KING has has been writing crime fiction since 1987 and won many awards for her work in fiction including the prestigious John Creasey Dagger, the Edgar, the Nero and Macavity Awards. Her background includes such diverse interests as Old Testament theology and construction work, and she is the author of highly praised stand-alone suspense novels and a contemporary mystery series, as well as the Mary Russell & Sherlock Holmes series. She lives in North California.

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Mrs Curzon Tussaud on 13 Oct. 2012
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
It must be at least 20 years since I last overshot my stop on the Tube, and that was because I fell asleep. Last night it happened again, but this time I was far from asleep; rather, I was captive in a dungeon underground with Mary, as she tried to break free from her shackles and save the life of the weakening Mahmoud. There are excellent reviews here which cover this period of Moroccan history and politics so I shall not rehearse them again here, but this is an exciting book in which LRK has found her form again, after the rather disappointing Pirate King. There is a novella at the end, Beekeeping for beginners, which returns to the first meeting of Holmes and Russell, and elaborates on a scenario where Russell's considerable inheritance puts her at risk from relatives who plot to.... no, read it for yourselves!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By David Roy on 30 Nov. 2012
Format: Hardcover
I love it when authors return to their usual quality after a failed attempt at doing something really interesting. The last Laurie R. King Sherlock Holmes novel was a seriously weak attempt at farce. In her latest Holmes novel, Garment of Shadows, King returns us to the Holmes and Mary Russell we all know and love. With political intrigue, investigation, twists and turns, as well as some great historical information, this is a standout novel and a refreshing return to the normal.

After the events of The Pirate King, Mary Russell and her husband, Sherlock Holmes, are in Morocco in 1924. The novel opens with Russell waking up locked in a room with no memory of who she is or how she got there, a painful headache the only reminder of what has happened. She's covered in blood, which can't be a good sign. She still has her wits, and when soldiers come banging on her door, she's able to get away. Meanwhile, two old friends have drawn Holmes into a growing conflict between France, Spain, and the strengthening Moroccan independence movement. War may be coming to Morocco. Will Russell find her memory--and Holmes--before things get worse?

I love the conceit in King's books that Russell is their author and King merely the editor. There's even an author's note in Garment of Shadows about how some of the events in the book happened while she wasn't there, and that she took them from disjointed segments, remarks, and testimonies told over the next few weeks and even years. She says that if this makes readers think the book is fiction, so be it.

King demonstrates that the previous book was just a bump in the road, bringing back the suspense and mystery that her books are known for and allowing the brief humorous asides to lighten the mood instead of trying to be zany.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Roman Clodia TOP 100 REVIEWER on 17 Oct. 2012
Format: Hardcover
It's 1924 and Sherlock Holmes is in Morocco trying to trace his wife, Mary Russell - while in Fez, a woman wakes up in a strange room, with no memory of who she is or why she's there....

I've dipped in and out of this series which follows Holmes and his sometime apprentice, now wife, on their post-Conan Doyle adventures. This certainly isn't a book for Holmes purists as, apart from the wife, Holmes also gets into some very politicised situations.

Set amongst Arab revolts against colonialism in the inter-war years, in the aftermath of T.E. Lawrence (`Laurence of Arabia'), this is a complex story of spies, gun-runners, and counter-spies, while Mycroft Holmes pulls strings from England.

I liked this a lot though it helps to have read the previous books as characters do reappear. So perhaps a challenging read to die-hard fans of the original Victorian Holmes, but an amusing read with serious undertones if you can accept a Holmes transformed.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By J. Rogers on 5 Mar. 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Laurie King, please, stop churning out Mary Russell novels just because your publisher
is screaming for the next one. The first five were great, and then, slowly, book by book,
the character and originality, the verve and humour, the very life of the two leading
people has been bled dry. Stop. Pirate King was awful. This was awful. Enough. Please.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Roman Clodia TOP 100 REVIEWER on 5 Oct. 2012
Format: Hardcover
It's 1924 and Sherlock Holmes is in Morocco trying to trace his wife, Mary Russell - while in Fez, a woman wakes up in a strange room, with no memory of who she is or why she's there...

I've dipped in and out of this series which follows Holmes and his sometime apprentice, now wife, on their post-Conan Doyle adventures. This certainly isn't a book for Holmes purists as, apart from the wife, Holmes also gets into some very politicised situations.

Set amongst Arab revolts against colonialism in the inter-war years, in the aftermath of T.E. Lawrence (`Laurence of Arabia'), this is a complex story of spies, gun-runners, and counter-spies, while Mycroft Holmes pulls strings from England.

I liked this a lot though it helps to have read the previous books as characters do reappear. So perhaps a challenging read for die-hard fans of the original Victorian Holmes, but an amusing book with serious undertones if you can accept a Holmes transformed.

(This review is from an ARC courtesy of the publisher).
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Paperback
This was a disappointing read.

There's an appeal to the conceit of finding an intelligent and capable female partner for Sherlock Holmes, rather like Harriet Vane and Lord Wimsey. But the partnership must be greater than the sum of its parts, and must also be interesting of itself. And if you're going to have plots that deal with diplomacy after the Great War, then it's as well to see that they have historic credibility.

There are two parts of this book where King's writing is superb. Both involve Mary Russell essentially on her own, with King brilliantly exploring her character's responses to unusual situations: they're the opening amnesia-dominated days in Fez, and the later subterranean incarceration. The book's almost worth it for these bits alone. But not quite.

The plot is laboured, creaks throughout, and finally shatters in an explanatory scene that needed a Poirot to do in justice. No originalityThe absent Mycroft Holmes again has a lot to answer for. The two Anglo-arab characters just aren't credible. In O Jerusalem there was enough of Lawrence of Arabia around to build a collage; not here, And what on Earth was Mary Russell doing in Morocco in the first place? And I thought that Spain had a bit of Morocco in the 20's only because France had given it to them, and exercised strict control over its politics.

If you must read it, borrow it from your library. We mustn't encourage to talented Ms King to write any more unless she does a lot better.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews



Feedback