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Gallifrey 3.3 - Appropriation (Doctor Who S.) [Audiobook] [Audio CD]

Paul Sutton
3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
Price: 10.99 & FREE Delivery in the UK. Details
o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o
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Frequently Bought Together

Gallifrey 3.3 - Appropriation (Doctor Who S.) + Gallifrey 3.4 - Mindbomb (Doctor Who S.) + Gallifrey 3.2 - Warfare (Doctor Who S.)
Price For All Three: 29.89

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Product details

  • Audio CD
  • Publisher: Big Finish Productions Ltd (31 July 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1844352064
  • ISBN-13: 978-1844352067
  • Product Dimensions: 13.8 x 12.6 x 1 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,016,700 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars "Post Boy!" 19 Oct 2010
Format:Audio CD
Even though another new war has begun, the legal mumbo-jumbo continues thick and fast. The pace is much slower than the two previous stories with longer stretches of music, at times amounting to a kind of audio collage. Actually that's an improvement. The big problem here is that the respective infirmities of Romana and Leela have forced Lalla Ward and Louise Jameson into a corner in terms of acting. Leela comes off rather well here ("Post Boy!") whereas Romana resorts to sighing and groaning her way through most of the episode. A secondary problem carried over from former stories is that, in spite of a much better script, there is still a lot of clumsy exposition: "His must be the only electronic communication system still working on the planet!" or "You should lie still within the null field of the medi-dais!" or "This frequency is having to contend with the residual radiation from the techno virus!" or "She looks like a corpse! She's obviously suffering a great deal!" or "Poor K9! You are so battered and dented. Are you all right?" This is unfair as, generally, Paul Sutton's script is an improvement on both 'Fractures' and 'Warfare'. Yet there are odd inconsistencies, not least in response to what is no doubt intended to be a rather brutal invasion. (A lot of screaming one minute and no-one being that bothered the next. Actually, the crowd sequences are generally pretty poor.) Another strand is that it is sometimes hard to keep up with who is who in the supporting cast. Charlie Ross's Jenartis is rather good but this may be that his more distinctive voice makes him the more noticeable. With Daniel Hogarth, an even more distinctive voice, the reverse is true. Nekistani = Slithergee = Kromon = Grel Mk II = Daniel Hogarth (again). The plot is more of the same constant twisting and turning, with the ending, no doubt supposed to be deeply portentous, making you shrug rather than gasp. (Colin Baker's brief reappearance as Maxil is a really nice touch, though.)
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 3.0 out of 5 stars  1 review
3.0 out of 5 stars "Post Boy!" 9 Oct 2010
By S Maslin - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
Even though another new war has begun, the legal mumbo-jumbo continues thick and fast. The pace is much slower than the two previous stories with longer stretches of music, at times amounting to a kind of audio collage. Actually that's an improvement. The big problem here is that the respective infirmities of Romana and Leela have forced Lalla Ward and Louise Jameson into a corner in terms of acting. Leela comes off rather well here ("Post Boy!") whereas Romana resorts to sighing and groaning her way through most of the episode. A secondary problem carried over from former stories is that, in spite of a much better script, there is still a lot of clumsy exposition: "His must be the only electronic communication system still working on the planet!" or "You should lie still within the null field of the medi-dais!" or "This frequency is having to contend with the residual radiation from the techno virus!" or "She looks like a corpse! She's obviously suffering a great deal!" or "Poor K9! You are so battered and dented. Are you all right?" This is unfair as, generally, Paul Sutton's script is an improvement on both 'Fractures' and 'Warfare'. Yet there are odd inconsistencies, not least in response to what is no doubt intended to be a rather brutal invasion. (A lot of screaming one minute and no-one being that bothered the next. Actually, the crowd sequences are generally pretty poor.) Another strand is that it is sometimes hard to keep up with who is who in the supporting cast. Charlie Ross's Jenartis is rather good but this may be that his more distinctive voice makes him the more noticeable. With Daniel Hogarth, an even more distinctive voice, the reverse is true. Nekistani = Slithergee = Kromon = Grel Mk II = Daniel Hogarth (again). The plot is more of the same constant twisting and turning, with the ending, no doubt supposed to be deeply portentous, making you shrug rather than gasp. (Colin Baker's brief reappearance as Maxil is a really nice touch, though.)
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