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Fuzzy Nation Mass Market Paperback – 14 May 2012


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Product details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 368 pages
  • Publisher: TOR; Reprint edition (14 May 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0765367033
  • ISBN-13: 978-0765367037
  • Product Dimensions: 10.5 x 2.7 x 17.1 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (27 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 229,941 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

John Scalzi won the 2006 John W. Campbell Award for Best New Writer, and his debut novel Old Man's War was a finalist for the Hugo Award. His other novels include The Ghost Brigades, The Last Colony, and The Android's Dream. He lives in southern Ohio with his wife and daughter.


Product Description

Review

"Scalzi readers as well as Piper fans should enjoy this modern throwback to SF's early years."

About the Author

John Scalzi is the author of several SF novels, including the bestselling Old Man's War sequence, comprising "Old Man's War," "The Ghost Brigades," and "The Last Colony." He is a winner of the John W. Campbell Award for Best New Writer, and he won the Hugo Award for "Your Hate Mail Will Be Graded," a collection of essays from his wildly popular blog Whatever (whatever.scalzi.com). He lives in Ohio with his wife and daughter.

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Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Toby Andersen on 14 Mar. 2013
Format: Mass Market Paperback Verified Purchase
I came at Fuzzy Nation as a writer interested in how a published writer would rework an old classic and reboot it for a modern audience. I have to say on finishing that I have a certain sympathy for both sides of the controversy this reboot has caused.
So I started this book by reading the original, Little Fuzzy by H Beam Piper. I'm grateful to Scalzi for somewhat backhandedly recommending me a really great book, that I devoured in a day or two and really enjoyed. The sentience question is dealt with well, but overall the book seemed to miss out on a few of the better legal related things it could have done with the plot. Fantastic concept, of which the closest comparison I can think of is Avatar.
I started Fuzzy Nation eager to see what Scalzi would do with this fantastic source material. But apart from Carl the dog's antics I didn't warm to it. I wondered why Scalzi had bothered. But then I started to appreciate the things he was doing better than Piper, the ex-lawyer was a better fit, the high range audio infused throughout the story, the smaller cast. Reading the books the way I did you couldn't help but compare. I spent more than two thirds of the novel slowly liking it more and more.

And by the end it was clear that Scalzi had taken source material of a charming but slightly flawed novel, and made it into a fantastic novel. By this point I was full of appreciation for just how clever and intricate and downright satisfying this book is throughout. I love it, I unreservedly love it. I rarely give out the perfect score for a story. I think I've done it maybe 10-15 times in more than 500 books. I didn't get there with Old Man's War (although `The Last Colony' wasn't far off) but this is something else. Taken on its merits alone, I'm tempted to actually give it a 10.
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11 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Louis "LEC Book Reviews" on 29 July 2011
Format: Hardcover
I went into Fuzzy Nation unsure of what to expect - I mean a novel reboot? - but I trusted in Scalzi. And he didn't let me down. This is a smart, compelling science fiction novel with a bit of an offbeat nature. Far from the galaxy-wide military science fiction of Scalzi's previous books, Fuzzy Nation concentrates on the fate of one small planet, on the fate of one small people, on the evaluation of what makes a species sentient or not. The varied, intelligent characters are effortlessly engaging carry us through this well executed story. It's not perfect, but Scalzi's latest comes close: diverse, thoughtful and just plain entertaining.

Josh Holloway is a social outlier by choice - he doesn't get along too well with people - yet he's an appealing character from the start. Holloway carries Scalzi's well-known humor and sarcastic dialogue, helping us overcome his unsocial ways and get closer to him through comic relief. How can you not like a character who in the first few pages of a book has his dog set off explosives for him? More than anything else, Holloway is entertaining. He might be a self-absorbed, anti-social man, but he's a funny man and one that has the tendency to get confrontational with people in the most amusing manner.

Unlike Scalzi's most famous work - his `Old Man's War' series - Fuzzy Nation is not military science fiction. That means no shoot-them-up action, space-side battles or planetary assaults, but rather an intimate look at the commercial and judicial turmoil that has arisen on an unexpectedly significant world. A surprising amount of the novel is dedicated to a court case, which is rather unusual for a science fiction novel.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Fuzzy Nation was a fun read.

The story revolves around Jack Holloway, a mining surveyor on an alien planet. The narrative style is easy to read and is a little comical at times, though I can't be certain if this was the author's full intent.

Holloway is a likeable character, in that he embodies a lot of cliched and overused character traits, such as cracking one-liners and generally not taking things too seriously (think cliche Hollywood action hero) that made this piece quite fun to read and often made me grin.

The book is good overall, with an interesting story, entertaining characters and a somewhat goofy ending. It's not full-on comedy, but it's not full-on realistic, either. That is the best description I can give for the feel of it. This is far from being a literary masterpiece, but it clearly isn't intended to be. It's fun read and that will make you grin now and then.

Personally, I haven't read the original story that this is apparently based off, so this review evaluates the book on its own merit.

It's not amazing, but it's not bad, either. The one thing that really grinded my gears about the writing, though, was that the author (or the editor, perhaps) seems to have a fetish with dialogue tags. Literally, after every single piece of dialogue, there was a he/she said tag, even when there were only two characters talking and the conversion was well-established, so the reader already knew who was saying what. It was totally unnecessary and got to the point where I genuinely wondered whether it was an attempt at filling out the word count, as the piece is long enough to be a full-length novel, though didn't really feel like it to me.

I am going to be quite wary of this author and will not be reading any of his other works if I find this trend is the same elsewhere.

In short, a decent book, but nothing special.
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