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Fuzzy-Felt Folk CD


Price: £5.49 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £10. Details
Only 4 left in stock.
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
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£5.49 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £10. Details Only 4 left in stock. Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

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Fuzzy-Felt Folk + Strange Folk
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Product details

  • Audio CD (3 July 2006)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: CD
  • Label: Trunk Records
  • ASIN: B000FIHIHA
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Vinyl
  • Average Customer Review: 3.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 104,995 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. I Start Counting (Demo) - Basil Kirchin
2. Singing Low - The Barbara Moore Singers
3. Merry Ocarina - Pierre Arvay
4. Tiffany Glass - Orriel Smith
5. Folk Guitar - Claude Vasori
6. Twinkle Twinkle - Christopher Casson
7. Cuckoo - Arthur Birkby
8. Spin Spider Spin - Peggy Zeitlin
9. Winds Of Space - Orriel Smith
10. The ELf - The Barbara Moore Singers
11. The Troll - Reg Tilsley
12. My Mother Said - Christopher Casson
13. Hey Robin - The Barbara Moore Singers
14. O Dear What Can The Matter Be - Christopher Casson
15. Teddy Bears Picnic - The Piggleswick Folk

Customer Reviews

3.2 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

16 of 16 people found the following review helpful By D. Stewart on 11 July 2006
Format: Audio CD
Jonny Trunk just keeps on delivering the goods from the early Wicker Man soundtrack release through to The Clangers music to the Kes score, his own fine recordings and now this wonderful set of sparkling childlike collection of folky oddities. There seems less and less things you can trust in these days but Trunk records ain't gonna let you down.

This collection touches and confuses you like ghosts of your childhood visiting from out of the past. It conjures up days when the sun was too bright to focus, days where raindrops raced each other down living room windows while wishing you could be out playing and tales of brave men and the sweet damsels they loved.

From Basil Kirchin's 'I Start Counting' theme you know you've entered a special place with this collection. The Barbara Moore Singers tracks are especially beautiful their telling of the life and times of Robin Hood 'Hey Robin' being particularly poignant. Reg Tilsley's The Troll may not be many people's idea of folk but is another beauty that would on its own justify buying this.

A really rare and magical compilation.
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14 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Jhitmee on 8 Aug. 2006
Format: Audio CD
Who could resist buying this - what an evocative title. However, in terms of inventing and back-dating a genre, it covers a multitude of songs which all slipped through the cracks, but now sit more or less together as children's music from the 60s and 70s. However, I must warn you discerning fans of acid folk out there (you know who you are by your beards) that this sometimes sounds a bit like all those easy listening comps (inflight entertainment, this is easy - remember when library music and old theme tunes reigned the reissue and compliation movement, before those beards got out of control?). However, there are lots of nice moments that "strange adults", as the liner notes put it, will find to enjoy. I love the song about the "pretty little maiden, singing low" and the one about "looking through Tiffany glass". However, I'm afraid to say that I don't want to hear the Teddy Bears Picnic or Twinkle Twinkle Little Star, however it is performed, and these versions hardly transform them. Maybe they remembered that children were also part of the target audience. However, even my angelic and beautiful little nieces might find it hard to sit through "I Start Counting" which is surely for the adults only. So a great idea, and some choice cuts (dare I say it, for your ipod) but perhaps there just isn't really a very deep mine of fuzzy felt folk after all. Perhaps the clangers and bagpus cds are fuzzy felt folk?

By the way, i gave it 4 stars as it looks like the other reviewer misrated their review. How generous I am!
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2 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Peter Uys HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on 27 April 2008
Format: Audio CD
This album contains an interesting variety of unreleased soundtrack demos, silly psychedelia and ditties from TV art programmes. The female vocal on the first track credited to Basil Kirchin reminds me of Francoise Hardy, all breezy and folksy. Singing Low by the Barbara Moore Singers with its male and female vocals is really incredibly naïve ... there's no other word for it. Also, not particularly inspiring - I don't want to hear it again. Pierre Arvay's Merry Ocarina is much nicer, an atmospheric instrumental with some appealing flourishes.

Francoise Hardy returns, er oops I mean Oriel Smith sighs her way through the jazzy Tiffany Glass and is also responsible for track nine, the experimentally jazzy Winds of Space, obviously inspired by Tim Buckley, whilst in between Folk Guitar by Claude Vasori comes & goes, leaving no impression. Christopher Casson makes a brief appearance with Twinkle Twinkle, followed by the charming Cuckoo by Arthur Birkby, a strange name for the lady with the delightful voice. Maybe her name's really Martha? Oh I see on the sleeve notes it's sung by the Barbara Moore Singers. I like it; it's got the sound of a real cuckoo clock.

Spin Spider Spin by Peggy Zeitlin is rather cute and comforting; it's about a friendly, harmless little spider. But did Peggy ever take into account the opinions of bees and other insects that would inevitably end up trapped and sucked dry? How insensitive. The Elf by the Barbara Moore Singers is as far removed from Tolkien as can be imagined, as is The Troll by Reg Tilsley, an instrumental with a buoyant lilting rhythm. If this is how trolls are represented, I shudder to think what Reg would have done with orcs and balrogs. Thanks Reg, for your whitewashing of the deviltry of Saruman and Sauron.
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