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Future Crayon [CD]

Broadcast Audio CD
4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
Price: 11.20 & FREE Delivery in the UK. Details
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Frequently Bought Together

Future Crayon + Tender Buttons + Haha Sound
Price For All Three: 43.25

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  • Tender Buttons 11.23
  • Haha Sound 20.82

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Product details

  • Audio CD (21 Aug 2006)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: CD
  • Label: Warp
  • ASIN: B000FS9LKM
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 32,620 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Listen to Samples and Buy MP3s

Songs from this album are available to purchase as MP3s. Click on "Buy MP3" or view the MP3 Album.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         

Samples
Song Title Time Price
Listen  1. Illumination 3:140.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  2. Still Feels Like Tears 3:410.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  3. Small Song IV 3:390.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  4. Where Youth And Laughter Go 2:430.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  5. One Hour Empire 1:420.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  6. Distant Call 3:330.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  7. Poem Of Dead Song 2:300.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  8. Hammer Without A Master 4:590.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  9. Locusts 5:000.99  Buy MP3 
Listen10. Chord Simple 4:380.99  Buy MP3 
Listen11. Daves Dream 4:010.99  Buy MP3 
Listen12. DDL 2:280.99  Buy MP3 
Listen13. Test Area 5:530.99  Buy MP3 
Listen14. Unchanging Window / Chord Simple 6:590.99  Buy MP3 
Listen15. A Man For Atlantis 3:150.99  Buy MP3 
Listen16. Minus Two 4:160.99  Buy MP3 
Listen17. Violent Playground 2:110.99  Buy MP3 
Listen18. Belly Dance 4:460.99  Buy MP3 


Product Description

Our product to treat is a regular product. There is not the imitation. From Japan by the surface mail because is sent out, take it until arrival as 7-14 day. Thank you for you seeing it.

Customer Reviews

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4.8 out of 5 stars
4.8 out of 5 stars
Most Helpful Customer Reviews
10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Futuristic crayon 31 Aug 2006
By E. A Solinas HALL OF FAME TOP 500 REVIEWER
Format:Audio CD
I have to admit that I've never been wild about the B-sides from Broadcast -- as much as I adore "Haha Sound" and "The Noise Made By People," but their early doodlings in "Work and Non-Work" just never grabbed me.

Fortunately their later B-sides, UK EPs, rarities and discards are far superior, as displayed in "Future Crayon." While not perfect -- some songs just never gel together as music -- some of the songs on here are perfect gems, and others are just chilly trippy music.

It open with the steady, solid "Illumination," where a steady bassline is wrapped up in airy synth, while Trish Keenan's clear voice croons a hard-to-decipher song. The music gets even harder in the second song, which is a droning ballad that sounds like a robot love song.

From there on, the spattering of B-sides and rarities takes all sorts of directions -- they do twinkly yet ominous pop melodies, meditative noodling, abrasive little sci-fi jazz numbers that never really form into songs, Middle-Eastern trip-hop, buzzy folk, angular electronica, and airy ambient numbers that drift off while you listen to them.

It's hard to really describe the sound of Broadcast, while avoiding words like "retro." In fact, it doesn't really sound like a retro band, but like a bunch of ghosts and meditative robots who have formed a sixties cover band, and are playing on a wintry morning. Yep, that's how it really sounds at times.

And the surprising thing about "Futuristic Crayon" is that many of the songs do seem to fit together, even though they were not made as an album -- the buzzy synth and ambiguous melodies tie together from song to song, so that if you didn't know better, you might think they had all been made together.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Broadcast compilation 10 Mar 2007
By HJ
Format:Audio CD
Broadcast have without doubt been the best British pop band for the last decade ("best group since The Smiths" etc etc) but Trish & co have never been too prolific - 4 albums only - so this round up of "extended play" singles and odds & ends is welcome. Stereolab, Tortoise & Yo La Tengo have all done this recently in the form of 3 or 4 cd box sets, so there will be disappointment that we only get a single disc here, especially since there are quite a few tracks missing (eg remixes & radio sessions) not to mention no unreleased material from all those "shelved" albums. And if any group could justify putting out live & DVD material it would be Broadcast.

Nevertheless Future Crayon presents a substantial "leftfield" overview of the range of Broadcast's music, with more of an experimental edge than the regular albums - cinematic themes, Krautrock work outs and lots of instrumentals, spiky glitchy electronica & percussion. For example the brilliant Hammer Without Master is a quintessential Broadcast soundscape but set to an almost trance techno style drone/pulse. It's also worth saying that there are no duplications with the other albums and even hardcore fans might not have tracks 8 to 13 as these come from obscure/deleted Warp releases.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Enjoyable compilation of cult act.... 5 Nov 2006
By Jason Parkes #1 HALL OF FAME
Format:Audio CD
Broadcast are probably not as widely known as they deserve to be on the strength of their records - drifting in a cult domain somewhere beneath Stereolab and Tortoise, and alongside the similarly ignored Pram. I guess it's a Birmingham thing?

The albums have been fine thus far, though certainly not as frequent as one would hope - you get the idea the members of the band have other lives as social workers, electronic engineers, or film archivists or something. Like Tortoise, they have found an apt home on Warp, the home of electronica for artists like The Aphex Twin, Autechre, and Boards of Canada. The material collected here has been spread around and about, the `Extended Play Two' e.p. was the first thing I picked up by them and I thought it was fantastic, sounding like a blend of Soviet News TV broadcasts and Stereolab (with whom Broadcast originally put records out with on the `Lab's label).

`The Future Crayon' is an ideal primer in a band who deserves a bit more attention; I guess if they were American they would have got it? The sleeve lets you know the origin of the 18 tracks, presented in non-linear order from their sources - the quality shows that a standard was met, the tracks drifting from 1998's `Hammer Without a Master', which is certainly a record Damon Albarn has heard, to 2003's `Pendulum' e.p. (which featured the gorgeous `Still Feels Like Tears', `Small Song IV', `One Hour Empire', `Minus Two', and `Violent Playground'). The releases `The Future Crayon' stems from are respectively: `We Are Reasonable People', `Echo's Answer', `Come on Let's Go', `Extended Play', `Extended Play Two', the `All Tomorrows Parties 01' collection, & the `Pendulum' e.p.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Wonderful and under-appreciated 8 May 2011
By Jason
Format:Audio CD
This is a collection of diverse material from Broadcast - B-sides from old EPs etc. But to me it sounds just as good as any normal album. And with 18 tracks it is a bargain.

"The Future Crayon" definitely has an experimental feel to it, with more meandering instrumentals than actual songs. But the songs are very good, drenched with the trippy film-noir sound that Broadcast originally cut their musical teeth on.

The instrumental tracks are sometimes a bit discordant, but have an ominous and hypnotic quality that wouldn't be out of place on the soundtrack of some surreal 60s movie. There's often an eery sci-fi quality that is reminiscent of the excellent "The Noise Made by People", but had become less obvious during the next two albums.

I probably like this album more than the preceeding one, "Tender Buttons", which was a bit pop-songy and conventional for my taste. "The Future Crayon" may not be the most immediately accessible of Broadcast's recordings, but no fan should be without it.

And everybody should be a fan of this wonderful and under-appreciated group, now sadly cut short by the tragic death of Trish Keenan, and no doubt destined for future cult status and immortality.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.9 out of 5 stars  7 reviews
13 of 15 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars futuristic "Crayon" 22 Aug 2006
By E. A Solinas - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
I have to admit that I've never been wild about the B-sides from Broadcast -- as much as I adore "Haha Sound" and "The Noise Made By People," but their early doodlings in "Work and Non-Work" just never grabbed me.

Fortunately their later B-sides, UK EPs, rarities and discards are far superior, as displayed in "Future Crayon." While not perfect -- some songs just never gel together as music -- some of the songs on here are perfect gems, and others are just chilly trippy music.

It open with the steady, solid "Illumination," where a steady bassline is wrapped up in airy synth, while Trish Keenan's clear voice croons a hard-to-decipher song. The music gets even harder in the second song, which is a droning ballad that sounds like a robot love song.

From there on, the spattering of B-sides and rarities takes all sorts of directions -- they do twinkly yet ominous pop melodies, meditative noodling, abrasive little sci-fi jazz numbers that never really form into songs, Middle-Eastern trip-hop, buzzy folk, angular electronica, and airy ambient numbers that drift off while you listen to them.

It's hard to really describe the sound of Broadcast, while avoiding words like "retro." In fact, it doesn't really sound like a retro band, but like a bunch of ghosts and meditative robots who have formed a sixties cover band, and are playing on a wintry morning. Yep, that's how it really sounds at times.

And the surprising thing about "Futuristic Crayon" is that many of the songs do seem to fit together, even though they were not made as an album -- the buzzy synth and ambiguous melodies tie together from song to song, so that if you didn't know better, you might think they had all been made together. Even in the folkier numbers like "Unchanging Window/Chord Simple," they put in some fuzz bass and touches of electronica.

There are a few duds, however -- "One Hour Empire" is basically one long drum solo with some flourishes thrown in, and it never actually becomes something listenable. And some of the songs just need tightening up, since they have bits that just waffle around aimlessly.

Trish Keenan's voice is one of Broadcast's most important assets -- her voice is clear, cool and thoughtful. James Cargill's music serves as the perfect backdrop for her singing and the cool, intelligent lyrics. "Some words cannot be bound/no anchor can be found/this land which used/will be too confused/and when they shake your hand/the ground will break away..."

If those few dud tracks had been excised, "Future Crayon" could have been the rare B-sides album that is mistaken for a full-length release. Like a flawed but still beautiful crystal.
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars colour outside the lines 21 Nov 2008
By McSpunkle - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
Although a collection of B-sides, EP tracks and rarities, The Future Crayon is a great starting point for people new to Broadcast's blend of dreamy pop, experimental electronica and psychedelic rock.

Most of these tracks were recorded between 2000 and 2003, a very fruitful period for the group. Opener "Illumination" is one of the finest songs they've ever recorded, with it's one note picked bass line, swelling ambient strings and Trish Keenen's stoned vocal delivery. Elsewhere the band glides effortlessly from krautrock influenced pop ("Still Feels Like Tears"), to jazz improv wierdness ("One Hour Empire"), to space-age lounge ("Daves Dream"), and even into noisy electronic sound-collage ("Minus Two"), without ever sounding the least bit pretentious.

The band have often been compared to Stereolab, and with good reason, they share their love of analog synths, propulsive beats, ambient drone and experimentation, but Broadcast are by no means followers.

About halfway through, vocals take a backseat for several instrumentals, including "Test Area" which starts as a laidback, hazy jam but morphs into a sinister rocker, like a trip turning for the worst. Then there's "A Man For Atlantis", a schizophrenic little number which can't decide whether it wants to be choppy electro hip-hop or futuristic doo-wop, jumping between the two with no shortage of blips and blurps along the way.

Probably my favorite though, is "Unchanging Window/Chord Simple", an extended and more tripped-out version of a song from their 2000 album The Noise Made By People. This sounds kind of like if Jefferson Airplane relocated to Mars for an acid kool-aid test in outer space.

And just when you think there can't possibly be any surprises left, Broadcast pull one final trick out of their sleeve. The album closes with "Bellydance", a funky little instrumental taken from the soundtrack to an imaginary spaghetti western, complete with 8-bit video game sound effects.

I also have to point out the wonderful musicianship throughout. Although there's no information on who played what in the booklet, Trish Keenen has a fantastic voice, at times whimsical and others monotone, like a sexy android. The drummer is phenomenal, whether just keeping a steady rhythm or spazzing out on some funked up jazzy beats. A lot of the time you can't even tell what instrument you're hearing, is it heavily treated electric guitar, tweeked keyboards or some alien instrument only they have possesion of?

At 18 tracks and almost 70 minutes of wonderful sounds, you really can't go wrong. Brilliant stuff here indeed. Broadcast are definitely one of the most exciting, challenging and rewarding bands working today. Highly recommended.
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars good 28 Nov 2006
By alexander laurence - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
Broadcast has always been a big favorite of mine. They have been in California many times in the past few years. There are two great albums, and now like a collection of b-sides and rarities. Maybe not so new to the hardcore Broadcast fan. A majority of the material was done in 1999-2001. There are some songs from the Pendulum EP too. This CD represents the more experiment and more non-commercial side of the band. Most of it comes from rare and hard to find releases, mostly on Warp Records. It is an excellent bunch of songs. I am glad that Broadcast is able to show off their many sides.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Broadcast - The Future Crayon 5 May 2011
By scoundrel - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
It's every collector's worst nightmare: all the singles and EPs and rarities we've been hording finally gets compiled in one place. So be it: Broadcast's _The Future Crayon_, while it doesn't hold together as an album, per se, still has moments of heartstopping beauty. For instance, the haunting "Illumination" is like a a break-up in gorgeous slow motion, while "Where Youth and Laughter Go" feels like the soundtrack to a 60s Antonioni film. The spare "Distant Call" relies, initially, on Keegan's voice until it gives way to a lovely tonal melody in its second half. Elsewhere, the sweet and romantic "Locusts" also rubs elbows with a long, dissociated outro. Indeed, Broadcast indulges its instrumental side, with the thickly sonic "Hammer Without a Master" or the more melancholic "Chord Simple" (which only gets better when paired with "Unchanging Window"). For those who like tropicalia, "Daves Dream" is a curious confection. They also get to highlight some of their more experimental moments, like the strange feedback that infects the delicate "Small Song IV" or the random detritus of "DDL." And is that a 60's girl group piano-chord rhythm I hear in the background of "A Man for Atlantis"? "Belly Dance" closes the album on a driving note, leaning on Middle Eastern influences like it's playing beneath a _Laurence of Arabia_ battle sequence. My only quibble: no Two Lone Swordsmen remix of "Come On Let's Go"? For shame.
5.0 out of 5 stars I'm in the "These are B-sides?" camp 30 Jan 2013
By J. Hussey - Published on Amazon.com
Verified Purchase
As other reviewers suggest, this is a pretty amazing collection. I understand why they'd be labeled b-sides, but they are a lovely (and sad, as I write this in 2013) complement to the rest of Broadcast's solid catalog. Kinda ambient, kinda moody, definitely worth the purchase.
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