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Further Notes From the Dispatch Box of John H Watson MD: More Untold Adventures of Sherlock Holmes: 2 [Paperback]

Hugh Ashton
4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
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Book Description

11 Jun 2013 The Dispatch Box of John H Watson MD
The second box ("the dispatch-box") to be discovered in the vaults of Cox & Co. of Charing Cross has been the source of even more discoveries concerning the celebrated detective Sherlock Holmes. This collection includes a Foreword from consulting Sherlockian Dr. Philip C. Eyster, who writes, "I had only read a few pages of his initial story, when I knew that Mr. Ashton has not only the skill but also the deep-felt desire to faithfully add to the canon the same Sherlock as came from the pen of Author Conan Doyle over 100 years ago". Included in this volume are four tales, all referenced in the canonical originally published adventures: The Abernetty Horror. A bloody crime in a Welsh fishing village points to one seemingly obvious answer. Holmes brings his reasoning powers to bear on the parsley and butter to discover the true solution (mentioned in The Six Napoleons). The Finsbury House. "The shocking affair of the Dutch steamship Friesland, that so nearly cost us both our lives." (The Norwood Builder) The Curious Affair of the Archdeacon. Mentioned in passing at the beginning of the Red Circle, this case is more light-hearted than many of Holmes' adventures. An Account of the Victor Lynch Forgery. An account of an early case of Sherlock Holmes, related not by Watson, but by Inspector Lestrade, in the form of a letter to the good doctor, following the events at Meiringen. Mentioned in both Study in Scarlet and the Sussex Vampire. The stories in this volume are authorized by the Conan Doyle Estate

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Further Notes From the Dispatch Box of John H Watson MD: More Untold Adventures of Sherlock Holmes: 2 + Notes From the Dispatch Box of John H Watson, MD: More Untold Adventures of Sherlock Holmes: 1 + The Reigate Poisoning Case: Concluded: As Recorded in the Notes Retrieved From the Dispatch-Box of John H. Watson MD: 3
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Product details

  • Paperback: 204 pages
  • Publisher: Inknbeans Press (11 Jun 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0615806570
  • ISBN-13: 978-0615806570
  • Product Dimensions: 20.3 x 12.7 x 1.2 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 341,998 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Hugh Ashton was born in the UK in 1956. After graduating from the University of Cambridge, he worked in a variety of jobs, including security guard, publisher's assistant, and running an independent record label, before coming to rest in the field of information technology, where he assisted perplexed users of computers and wrote explanations to guide them through the problems they encountered.

A long-standing interest in Japan led him to emigrate to that country in 1988, where he has remained ever since; writing instruction manuals for a variety of consumer products, assisting with IT-related projects at banks and financial institutions, and researching and writing industry reports on the Japanese and Asian financial industries. Some of the knowledge he has gained in these fields forms the background for At the Sharpe End, his second novel.

He has recently published with Inknbeans Press of Los Angeles: Tales from the Deed Box of John H. Watson MD, More from the Deed Box of John H. Watson MD, Secrets from the Deed Box of John H Watson MD, The Darlington Substitution, and Notes from the Dispatch-Box of John H. Watson MD each containing Sherlock Holmes adventures, in the style of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. Inknbeans Press has also published his collection of short stories set in Japan, Tales of Old Japanese, featuring the culture and habits of the older generation of Japanese. The first three books of Holmes-ian adventure have been compiled into an "omnibus edition", entitled The Deed Box of John H. Watson MD.

His first published novel, Beneath Gray Skies, is an alternative history set in a "past that never happened", where the Civil War was never fought.

His second novel, At the Sharpe End, features an expatriate consultant living in Tokyo, Kenneth Sharpe, who finds himself thrust into a world of violence and high finance that takes him by surprise.

The third novel, Red Wheels Turning, takes some of the characters of Beneath Gray Skies, and sets them in the background of Tsarist Russia, where a battle of wits takes place to control the secret Russian wonder weapons that could win the war for the Allies.

Hugh currently lives with his wife Yoshiko in the old town of Kamakura to the south of Tokyo, where he is working on future novels and stories.

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Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Admirably close to the real thing 29 Aug 2013
Format:Paperback
Having exhausted the deed box, Hugh Ashton has more recently found another source, resulting so far in two more paperbacks: Notes from the Dispatch-Box of John H Watson MD and Further Notes from the Dispatch-Box of John H Watson MD. The first gives us `The Affair of the Vatican Cameos', `The Reigate Poisoning Case' (`The Reigate Poisoning Case Concluded', published separately as a Kindle, very cleverly turns the story on its head) and, unexpectedly, `The History of John Augustus Edward Clay as Told by Himself'. In the second volume are `The Abernetty Horror', `The Case of the Finsbury House', `The Curious Affair of the Archdeacon' and `An Account of the Victor Lynch Forgery' - that last told by Inspector Charles [sic] Lestrade. Mr Ashton's stories are admirably close to the real thing.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Another excellent collection 17 Oct 2013
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
I think I have now read all of Hugh Ashton's dispatch box tales and this one may well be the best of the bunch. I had thought of skipping the last story which details Inspector Lestrade's reminiscences of encountering Sherlock Holmes for the first time but I'm glad I didn't. It was short and sweet but a great read. And relatively simple.

All of the stories here have something to recommend them but "The Curious Affair of the Archdeacon" in particular is light and amusing and a little different but at the same time still capturing the essence of a Holmes and Watson mystery.

Hugely entertaining and recommended for those who don't aspire to be over-scholarly about the canon. Read them, don't study them. Read them as if it was simply 1890 rather than a pretentious and affected new(ish) millennium.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Enjoyable 2 Oct 2013
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
A good pastiche, unusually on the whole it is written in a British English which would have been recognisable to Holmes and Watson.
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Amazon.com: 4.7 out of 5 stars  19 reviews
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars More Of The Same (Sigh) 31 July 2013
By Drstatz - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
I have all of Hugh's books and was honored to write a review of the second one. His works out do Doyle and he has a light but intense touch in his narratives. An amusing exercise for any of his stories is to try to guess the outcome. You will get it when he presents it. Trying to read his mind is a total waste of time. If I were still teaching English on the middle school level, I would have loved to have had access to Hugh's stories to mix and match with the Conan Doyle stories we covered. They fit in that seamlessly.

Anyone checking out these reviews while deciding whether or not to purchase this book, get it. They are great stories. While you are at it, avoid the rush and order up his other books too. You'll be glad you did.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Perfect Pastiche 15 July 2013
By Amazon Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
FULL DISCLOSURE: I wrote the forward to this book and below reprint my words from that forward which express my enthusiasm for all of Hugh Ashton's Pastiches.

When I was about 10 years old, I received " The Canon". Up until that time the only " Canon" with which I was familiar was the Bible. For a young boy this book of over a thousand pages and no pictures presented a daunting assignment. Yet I dug in and found myself enthralled with each story, and completed the book in a year or so. That volume followed me to college, where my roommate and I had a standing appointment each Saturday evening to read aloud one story over a late night pizza.

It wasn't until I had read The Canon through four or five times that I realised I needed more. There must be something more. These were the days before the internet, and I wasn't in contact with other fans and had never heard the word " pastiche". Finally I came across The Exploits of Sherlock Holmes by Adrian Conan Doyle and John Dickson Carr published in 1955. I was back in business with 12 "new" stories about my hero.

In the mid 1980s I began to travel internationally for my work on a regular basis, usually every other month. These travels always took me through London, where I would build in a day to walk up and down Charing Cross Road, entering every used bookshop, looking for "more". I was often rewarded with a new book full of more tales, some good and some not so good.

Somewhere along the way, my interest turned into an obsession, I simply had to have "more". It was at this point that I embarked on a quest for the "perfect pastiche". That story, which, if placed alongside the originals, would never be recognized or out of place.

Since the 1890s Doyle's detective has been immortalized in both parody and pastiche. In the last 20 years the genre has gone "viral". The last three years have seen the advent of two major motion pictures, a BBC production in the UK, and another programme in the US placing Holmes in contemporary New York City. It might be safe to say that Sherlock Holmes has never been more popular. There are estimated to be over 10,000 novels and short stories about the man from Baker Street. With such a volume of material it becomes clear that the average Sherlockian can not read everything. One must discriminate and find those works that yield the most enjoyment. How do you like your Holmes? Confidently extracting the truth from late 19th century murderers, or battling Dracula and extraterrestrials?

Over the past 30 years, I've learned that some authors either by design, default, or disability write tales that only bear a passing resemblance to the originals. Yet for my taste, I want my Holmes and Watson to live forever with the same personalities, foibles, idiosyncrasies, and vocabulary.

While many make a valiant attempt at a faithful pastiche, I found that very few are able to carry it off. And distinguishing the good from the mediocre is akin to the difference between art and pornography; it's hard to define, but you know it when you see it.

Into this rarified air comes Hugh Ashton with his newly discovered Dispatch and Deed Boxes. I had only read a few pages of his initial story, when I knew that Mr. Ashton has not only the skill but also the deep-felt desire to faithfully add to the canon the same Sherlock as came from the pen of Arthur Conan Doyle over 100 years ago.

Mr. Ashton has said that "Developing the style is relatively easy, and finding a crime, and planting the clues that allow Holmes to solve the crime, not too hard".

To which, in response, I would offer Hugh's own dialogue between Holmes and Watson after Sherlock displays his expertise at deducing details of a client's life before ever meeting them. Watson says, " You make it sound absurdly simple." Holmes replies, " It is absurdly simple, and yet I seem to be the only man in London--nay, in the whole kingdom--who seems capable of the feat".

Based on the number of authors who try and the few that succeed, Hugh Ashton makes something incredibly difficult look easy, and he "seems to be the only man in the whole kingdom capable of the feat."

So sit down, and be transformed back into the age of gaslights and gasogenes. Where Queen Victoria rules the realm and the king of consulting detectives paces the sitting room floor, stopping every so often to look out the window for the arrival of another poor soul in trouble.

This volume you hold in your hand gives us the Holmes of history. Hugh tackles the Abernetty Horror mentioned by Watson in the Six Napoleons, and is famous for the pairing of parsley and butter. Mr. Ashton then authors a longer substantive tale of The Finsbury House, based on Holmes' passing reference in The Norwood Builder to "the Dutch steamship Friesland" which does indeed nearly cost them both their lives.

Ashton then lightens up the mood in The Affair of the Archdeacon, before finishing this volume with The Victor Lynch Forgery case, an early tale as told through the pen of Inspector Lestrade of Scotland Yard and referred to in A Study in Scarlet and The Sussex Vampire.

With these four new stories, Hugh Ashton's pen provides the details of cases mentioned but never clarified. And I feel confident in labeling each story as " The Perfect Pastiche".

"Tolle Lege" (St. Augustine) " Take up and read".

Dr. Philip C. Eyster, Consulting Sherlockian, Maine, USA
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Does Holmes & Watson Proud 11 July 2013
By Vince Drexelius - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
Once again Hugh Ashton has hit a home run with Further Notes from the Dispatch-Box of John Watson. The stories are written in the original style of Sir Author Conan Dole and have some great and unforeseen twists. As a lover of the original Sherlock Holmes stories, i can highly recommend this set of tales.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars An excellent series 29 Jun 2014
By Clifford L. Feightner - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
Mr Ashton has recreated an excellent portrayal series, that being the Dispatch and Deed Box series of some of the lost stories alluded the by Dr. Watson. As a devotee of The Canon, this twice-published author highly recommends his fine work! Cliff Feightner 2014
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars ENJOY 26 Jun 2014
By Joe F. Pace - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
GREAT READING-WOW!!!
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