Buy New

or
Sign in to turn on 1-Click ordering.
Buy Used
Used - Like New See details
Price: 5.20

or
 
   
More Buying Choices
Have one to sell? Sell yours here
Sorry, this item is not available in
Image not available for
Colour:
Image not available

 
Tell the Publisher!
Id like to read this book on Kindle

Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.

Fundamentals of OOP and Data Structures in Java [Hardcover]

Richard Wiener , Lewis J. Pinson

RRP: 57.00
Price: 53.81 & FREE Delivery in the UK. Details
You Save: 3.19 (6%)
o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
Want it Tuesday, 22 April? Choose Express delivery at checkout. Details
Amazon.co.uk Trade-In Store
Did you know you can use your mobile to trade in your unwanted books for an Amazon.co.uk Gift Card to spend on the things you want? Visit the Books Trade-In Store for more details or check out the Trade-In Amazon Mobile App Guidelines on how to trade in using a smartphone. Learn more.

Book Description

5 Jun 2000 0521662206 978-0521662208
Fundamentals of OOP and Data Structures in Java is a text for an introductory course on classical data structures. Part One of the book presents the basic principles of Object-Oriented Programming (OOP) and Graphical User Interface (GUI) programming with Java as the example language. Part Two introduces each of the major data structures with supporting, GUI-based laboratory programs designed to reinforce the basic concepts and principles of the text. These laboratories allow the reader to explore and experiment with the properties of each data structure. All source code for the laboratories is available on the web. By integrating the principles of OOP and GUI programming, this book takes the unique path of presenting the fundamental issues of data structures within the context of paradigms that are essential to today's professional software developer. The authors assume the reader has only an elementary understanding of Java and no experience with OOP.

Product details


More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

Review

'… a very good approach in introducing the concepts of object-orientated programming … I recommend this book for professionals who want a deeper look at the design of data structures in Java.' Karthik Gajjala, Artificial Intelligence

'… if you would like to know more about the theory behind OOP and data types this is a good book'. Hubert Klein Ikkink, Developers Review

'This is a nicely laid-out hardback … the reader wishing to learn how to implement the various Data Structures in Java would be pleased.' CVu

'… provides an excellent OOP-based implementation of data structures.' Ann Fleury, Computing Reviews

'… very clear and free of errors … contains extensive relevant material in a very readable form, organized into digestible and practical chapters. In addition to its use as a CS2-level textbook, this book could also be useful to practitioners who lack a formal computer science background.' M. M. Tanik, Computing Reviews

Book Description

This book is for an undergraduate course on data structures, presenting the basic principles of OOP and GUI programming with Java. By integrating the concepts of OOP and GUI programming, it presents the fundamental issues of data structures in the context of paradigms essential to today's professional software developer.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
First Sentence
The principles and practices of object-oriented software construction have evolved since the 1960s. Read the first page
Explore More
Concordance
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

Sell a Digital Version of This Book in the Kindle Store

If you are a publisher or author and hold the digital rights to a book, you can sell a digital version of it in our Kindle Store. Learn more

Customer Reviews

There are no customer reviews yet on Amazon.co.uk.
5 star
4 star
3 star
2 star
1 star
Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.0 out of 5 stars  8 reviews
9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Book is too dated to use now (as of 2005) 3 Jun 2005
By DuBois - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover
After reading the first three chapters, I had to conclude that the book was too dated to use. Here are some of its problems:

(1) The book and previous reviewers speak of code that can be downloaded from the publisher's web site; the publisher no longer makes such downloads available.

(2) With respect to software design methodologies, the author embraces "design by contract" which was championed by Bertrand Meyer in 1997 in "Object-Oriented Software Construction." This approach has pretty much been left by the wayside, with "patterns" being the currently touted approach. The author also adheres to a design methodology which rigidly classifies object messages as being either commands (methods that change the internal state of the object) or queries (methods that report back on the object's internal state). When it was time to implement stacks, this rigid adherence put him in a quandry. Traditionally "popping" a stack results in both situtations: the topmost value is returned by the pop (like a query) and the internal state of the stack is changed (like a command). To adhere to the command/query dichotomy, the author made popping a two-process. "Pop" changes the internal state of the stack, storing the topmost element in an internal field and reducing the size of the stack by one. However in order to restrict popping to "command" status, the topmost value is not reported back to the invoking code. Instead the user has to issue a subsequent "query" requesting the value of the topmost element. This implementation is oblivious to the impact that such a two-step process would have in a threaded environment. If thread_2 issues a pop command after thread_1 pops, but prior to thread_1 querying for the topmost value, the topmost element would be lost forever.

(3) The author makes use of Java classes that have since been deprecated. For instance he uses the Vector class, which has been more or less replaced by ArrayList.

(4) The author's convention for naming methods isn't in line with the current, prevailing conventions. For "commands" he uses various action words followed by a noun which describes the field being impacted by the command. For "queries" he restricts the name to a noun or noun phrase which describes the field value that's being returned. However it is now more common to see "commands" named "setField()" and "queries" named "getField()". Many IDE's automatically create method names utilizing the "set" and "get" naming convention.

For these reasons, I can no longer recommend the book.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A book that fills a real need in the CS curriculum 1 Jan 2001
By Charles Ashbacher - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover
The relative newness and the complexity of Java have created an enormous amount of difficulty for those who teach it in the CS curriculums around the world. While the structure of the computer science major is also not a stable entity, there are some constants that must be covered. A course in data structures is a staple in the beginning, generally being taken after the first course in programming in the main language used in the major. The problem has been that Java is such a large language, there are so many different ways to teach the first course. This has required textbooks in data structures using Java to either assume very little or to assume too much.
This book takes a middle, very effective approach. The assumptions are that the reader has a good deal of programming knowledge, but not necessarily in Java or any other object-oriented language. Part one is devoted to a survey of object-oriented programming in general and how it is done in Java in particular. An instructor could use it to prep the students familiar with programming in other languages or to fill the holes of any material not covered in previous courses.
The main point of the book is of course the coverage and explanation of the standard data structures used in programming. These structures are described by a combination of explanation and a great deal of source code. To help prevent the cramps in the fingers and brain that would come from typing it all in, all source code is available online. This is especially helpful because exercises are included at the end of the chapters and many of them involve modification of the code in the text. Turning good code into bad code by mucking with it and then correcting it is far and away the best way to learn to program, since that is how we program anyway. This is a backhand way of saying that the exercises make excellent short, yet challenging programming assignments.
Data structures has often been the course where computer science students are set on the track to performing significant work in the field. Good data structures texts in Java have been lacking, so this book fills a significant void. Definitely worth examining for adoption.
9 of 12 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Paperweight 16 Jun 2000
By C. Kerns - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover
... This book was written for the authors' freshman level Object Oriented Design and Data Structures course at the University of Colorado at Colorado Springs. In other words, it was written for a group who has no choice in what they read, as the students are forced to read and learn from this poorly written book...,If you are a professor considering this book, PLEASE, for the sake of the students, keep looking elsewhere. If you are a professional looking for a good reference or someone new to computer science who wants to learn on their own, then this book will provide nothing useful and most likely just confuse you more.
The first part of the text is meant to explain the fundamentals of Object Oriented Design and programming, specifically with Java 2. It is the worst explanation of OO I have yet to see. Even if you think you understand OO, this book will confuse you! The book assumes you have some basis in Java already. Why would the authors assume you have a basis in Java, but not in OO?
The second portion of the text focuses on building the basic data Structures in Java. They use a 'Foundations' package which they wrote themselves. This package is written and implemented in a very academic way. It deviates often from the true implementation of the Classes that are provided in the Java libraries. I will say the treatment of data structures is written mildly better than the sections on OO, but so much of the code samples are 'left as an exercise for the reader' that it is often difficult to glean useful information from the code samples....
6 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Selecting a Java textbook for teaching a Graduate Seminar 9 Sep 2000
By Dwight Peltzer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover
September 8, 2000
It is customary as Professor of Computer Science at Long Island University for me routinely to review and select textbooks about Object-Oriented programming and Data Structures in Java and other programming languages for both undergraduate and graduate classes. Almost every day the Computer Science professors receive desk copies of new computer textbooks from publishing houses. Most textbooks are unacceptable for one reason or another. Either they don't cover their subject adequately; appear to be written for the author's peers rather than for the student, or coded examples don't work so the book is rejected.
Recently, while attempting to select a textbook on Object-Oriented programming and Data Structures in Java for both undergraduate and graduate seminars for the fall term 2000, I discovered one outstanding book: Fundamentals of OOP and Data Structures in Java by Richard Wiener and Lewis J. Pinson, published by Cambridge University Press, ISBN No. 0-521-66220-6.
Fundamentals of OOP and Data Structures in Java is written in a clear, concise style with numerous examples that WORK. This textbook is written with students in mind, not the authors' peers. It is evident that Professors Wiener and Pinson understand data structures, their intended use in any programming environment, and when and how to use them. Conceptually, their presentation makes this book a must for any class that focuses on Data Structures and Object-Oriented programming in Java. I particularly like "Part Two: Data Structures." This section discusses "Abstract Data Types," "Containers as Abstract Data Types," and the classic data structures themselves. No important topic is bypassed or perfunctorily treated. Clear explanations and examples abound.
Students, professors, or anyone interested in object-oriented programming and data structures in Java, BUY THIS BOOK!
Professor Dwight Peltzer Dept. of Computer Science Long Island University Brookville, NY
5.0 out of 5 stars Selecting a Java textbook for teaching a Graduate Seminar 9 Sep 2000
By Dwight Peltzer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover
September 8, 2000
It is customary as Professor of Computer Science at Long Island University for me routinely to review and select textbooks about Object-Oriented programming and Data Structures in Java and other programming languages for both undergraduate and graduate classes. Almost every day the Computer Science professors receive desk copies of new computer textbooks from publishing houses. Most textbooks are unacceptable for one reason or another. Either they don't cover their subject adequately; appear to be written for the author's peers rather than for the student, or coded examples don't work so the book is rejected.
Recently, while attempting to select a textbook on Object-Oriented programming and Data Structures in Java for both undergraduate and graduate seminars for the fall term 2000, I discovered one outstanding book: Fundamentals of OOP and Data Structures in Java by Richard Wiener and Lewis J. Pinson, published by Cambridge University Press, ISBN No. 0-521-66220-6.
Fundamentals of OOP and Data Structures in Java is written in a clear, concise style with numerous examples that WORK. This textbook is written with students in mind, not the authors' peers. It is evident that Professors Wiener and Pinson understand data structures, their intended use in any programming environment, and when and how to use them. Conceptually, their presentation makes this book a must for any class that focuses on Data Structures and Object-Oriented programming in Java. I particularly like "Part Two: Data Structures." This section discusses "Abstract Data Types," "Containers as Abstract Data Types," and the classic data structures themselves. No important topic is bypassed or perfunctorily treated. Clear explanations and examples abound.
Students, professors, or anyone interested in object-oriented programming and data structures in Java, BUY THIS BOOK!
Professor Dwight Peltzer Dept. of Computer Science Long Island University Brookville, NY
Were these reviews helpful?   Let us know
ARRAY(0xa99c9594)

Customer Discussions

This product's forum
Discussion Replies Latest Post
No discussions yet

Ask questions, Share opinions, Gain insight
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 

Search Customer Discussions
Search all Amazon discussions
   


Look for similar items by category


Feedback