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  • Full Moon In Paris [1984] [DVD]
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Full Moon In Paris [1984] [DVD]


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  • Actors: Pascale Ogier, Tchéky Karyo, Fabrice Luchini, Virginie Thévenet, Christian Vadim
  • Directors: Eric Rohmer
  • Writers: Eric Rohmer
  • Producers: Margaret Ménégoz
  • Format: PAL
  • Language: French
  • Subtitles: English
  • Region: Region 2 (This DVD may not be viewable outside Europe. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 4:3 - 1.33:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Classification: 15
  • Studio: Arrow
  • DVD Release Date: 22 Mar. 2004
  • Run Time: 97 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B0001GNJII
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 129,975 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Reviews

Product Description

A young French woman (Pascale Ogier) leads a double life, but is not satisfied with either. She flits between her country retreat, shared with her boyfriend (Tcheky Karyo), and her Parisian apartment, where she is subject to the entreaties of a young suitor. Eric Rohmer directs this low-key study of a woman who finds it impossible to settle down. The role was created in collaboration with Ogier, who died of cancer shortly after the film was completed.

From Amazon.co.uk

Full Moon in Paris, the fourth of Eric Rohmer's Comedies and Proverbs, is also the most ironic and, in many ways, the most judgmental of his films. Louise (Pascale Ogier), a restless designer bored with sleepy suburban life outside of Paris, lives with her lover, Remy (Tcheky Karyo), a stable architect happy with a calm home life and a long-term relationship. The independent Louise decides to move back into her old Paris apartment during the week, losing herself in the bustle of dinner parties and nightclubs and single men, while spending her weekends back with Remy. Louise becomes briefly entangled with another man, a spontaneous musician who is the opposite of Remy, but in a neat twist on the formula, Remy himself drifts to another--at the suggestion of Louise herself.

Willowy Ogier's kittenish sexuality and zest for life are wrapped in a self-absorbed determination that borders on indifference, but for the most part this is another wryly witty look at modern love from the master of the sophisticated romantic comedy. Fabrice Luchini plays Louise's best friend and conniving confidante, Octave, and Laszlo Szabo appears as a café patron who pontificates on the magical effects of the full moon. Ogier, who died shortly after the film's release, designed many of the handsome sets. Rohmer followed this with perhaps his most generous character study, the modestly magical romantic adventure Summer. --Sean Axmaker

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

12 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Andy Millward VINE VOICE on 3 July 2005
Format: DVD
Like most Rohmer films, this is an artfully constructed and beautifully played drama of social mores, manners and morals - with an edge. I watched it with great interest, but only later realised that the heroine at the centre of these dilemmas, Pascale Ogier, died shortly afterwards of a heart attack on the eve of her 28th birthday in 1984. What a tragedy!
I watched the film again, seeing her magnificent and award-winning performance in a new light. Art and life seem so closely intertwined that I could picture the reactions of Eric Rohmer's finely honed characters if Louise in the film had suddenly died. It's a great credit to Rohmer that his creations lead a parallel existence but entirely true to life.
For all the slightly theatrical dialogue-centred approach, Full Moon in Paris could almost be a fly-on-the-wall documentary where people speak their minds or hide their feelings credibly but betray their often raw emotions in a subtle variety of details. Emotions are the key to Rohmer - sometimes suppressed, often charged, frequently confused. They run deep through scenes that might otherwise seem superficial and even trite. Characters talk about their everyday issues, but their eyes and body language betray their true feelings. This is great cinema from a master of the art, on a par with Fellini, Truffault and Godard. His only sin was to go about it quietly and not sing his own praises!
As for Louise, she has to decide between the staid Remi and an exciting new future in Paris. She wants to have both but ultimately it proves impossible to have her cake and eat it. For Ogier, I can only think of what might have been. Her sparkling future was cruelly denied.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Frank on 21 Mar. 2010
Format: DVD
Set firmly in the genre of "Chick Flick", this is a nice story about a basically unhappy, unsettled, restless young lady looking for her own space who ends up unhappy, but getting what she was wishing for. The story is just a narrative on human relationships. What at first feels like a very sad ending, we can justify as the appropriate outcome for what the young lady (who felt prisoner in a clostophobic relationship) was seeking all along and didn't want to admit - a way out.

I think without the acting of Pascale Ogier, this would be a very ordinary film. She was a captivating young actress. Recommended for a young, chick-flick audience, but worth watching for all for Ogier's performance.
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Format: DVD
Rohmer made variations on the same film-precisely why he organised his work into 3 related series:the Moral Tales,the Comedies and Proverbs,the Tales of the 4 Seasons.He explored love through leisurely talk around love. There is a curious absence of it in his world.His stories are more about the moral and social conditions in which love between a couple may or may not be possible,as characters either manouevre each other into liaisons or agonise over where they belong. Following the male protagonists of the Moral Tales,the Comedies and Proverbs focussed on young heroines played by more or less unknown names,among them the late Pascale Ogier. Rohmer skillfully tacks between their thoughts and feelings using reasonabally crafted dialogue,so you get a sense of changing perspectives and modified attitudes,especially after they have had more inflexible disagreements about their socializing habits and living arrangements,when they have calmed down and utilise logic,revealing flaws in the logic. Similarly the discussion between her and Octave in the restaurant where she spies Remi and earlier he'd seen her girlfirend(not sure which one!) and he propounds his theories of them already being an item therefore encouraging her to have a place in Paris to live,would back this up,is truly deliciously teasing.

He who has two women loses his soul. He who has two houses loses his mind is the proverb Rohmer self concocts to this episode.Louise(Ogier) subconsciously wants her independence to socialise with her own friends rather than to be married to Remi.An excessive idealism about love sends her in unexpected directions.A complex heroine played with a mix of sensuality and sensitivity by Ogier(last seen in Le Pont du Nord with mother Bulle Ogier).
Read more ›
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 9 reviews
10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
ANOTHER GEM OF ONE OF THE LAST TRUE GIANTS OF TODAY CINEMA 10 Feb. 2001
By Daniel S. - Published on Amazon.com
Format: DVD
Fourth movie of director Eric Rohmer's COMEDIES AND PROVERBS serie, FULL MOON IN PARIS is without contest a masterpiece. Three terrific actors : Tchéky Kario who, 10 years later, will be the villain in GOLDENEYE, Fabrice Luchini who has managed, in the nineties, to be present in all major french movies and Pascale Ogier who will tragically disappear in 1984, the year of the theatrical release of FULL MOON IN PARIS. A more than clever screenplay with subtle dialogs will clean your ears, or your eyes if you don't understand french, from the spoken insanities of today cinema.
Pascale "Louise" Ogier is living with Tchéky "Rémi" Karyo in the suburbs of Paris. She likes to pass her spare time with her ancient friends while Rémi stays at home. So, in order to save their relationship, she decides to sleep every friday night in a flat in Paris, alone. FULL MOON IN PARIS describes the consequences of this decision during the three months that follow.
Like in the plays of Musset or Marivaux, tragedy is always hidden behind comedy and Pascale Ogier's smiles and tears form a wonderful rainbow.
As always in Fox Lorber presentations of european movies, subtitles can't be removed and sound & images are of VHS quality, no more.
A DVD for your library.
7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
Beware of Distraction . . . 7 Jan. 2004
By Amazon Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
One short point to add to the many excellent reviews of this movie, if you watch the early scene "Camille's Party" very carefully, ignoring the distraction of the conflict between Remi and Louise that brackets other key meetings, you may increase your enjoyment of this subtle French talkie. Or you may choose to view this scene again at the end of the movie. It's all there, clear as a bell, but one is distracted by the cameras attention to the neurotic young focus of the movie.
In fact, this is the only Rohmer movie out of half a dozen I've viewed where a couple clearly and emphatically makes the transition to a mature, happy and probably lifelong relationship. But it is mostly done off camera.
A couple of other tiny points: The married writer who pursues Louise is probably Rohmer's alter ego in the film, and Louise probably represents his neurotic early films that typically don't go anywhere. The movie also seems to have some message about the project-like surburbs with their cold metal facilities, vs. the warm hubub of Paris. In other Rohmer movies, Parisians retreat to georgeous country homes with gardens, or seaside villas, but pointedly not in this movie.
If you have known people like the characters in the film, who say they want to be alone but compulsively hang out with whoever is available, becoming distracted from their true goals; if you like irony and don't need everything spelled out, and like to think about movies, you will enjoy this one. If you just want a light romantic comedy, watch an American film.
7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
One of the most touching films that I have ever seen!!!!! 29 Oct. 2001
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: DVD
"Full Moon in Paris" is an absolute gem, far more than words can say! It is an absolutely joy and pleasure, to watch, and I can honestly say that, of all the films in my video library, this one is, by far, the most frequently viewed!
All of the actors in this film give exceptionally commendable performances! Having said that, however, I must say that, quite truly, this movie really belongs to the lovely French actress, Pascale Ogier, who portrayed the character "Louise". I only hope and pray, that she won an award for best actress, as a result of her stellar performance, in this brilliantly glorious film.
I was quite saddened to learn, however, that Ms. Ogier, quite tragically, died of a heart attack in 1984, which was the same year "Full Moon in Paris" was released. She was only 24 years old.
Thus, in very many ways, this movie is made all that very much more significant, for it is a final tribute to Pascale Ogier, whose shining light was cast into darkness, far too soon.
Goodbye, Pascale. You were one of France's true gems. You shall forever be lovingly remembered, as the sparkling star of "Full Moon in Paris", whose exceptionally promising film career tragically ended, before it barely had a chance, to begin.
5 of 7 people found the following review helpful
Full Moon, Full Marks. 29 Oct. 2003
By Niall - Published on Amazon.com
Format: DVD
Director Eric Rohmer's FULL MOON IN PARIS is the fourth in his series of "Comedies and Proverbs" starring Pascale Ogier and Tcheky Karyo. To some, Rohmer is an acquired taste. You either embrace or dislike his style of filmmaking. He is one of the few directors that really know how to direct women. He has an uncanny knack of getting inside their minds, and Full Moon In Paris is no exception.
The story opens in Louise's (Pascale Ogier) apartment home in Marne-La-Vallee that she shares with boyfriend Remi (Tcheky Karyo). Remi is an architect and a home bird, while Louise is more the out going type. She is the very opposite to Remi's rather conservative personality. Although in love with him, she feels uncomfortable whenever they go out together, as she senses that Remi is ill at ease over her long hours of socializing. Ideally, she wants to move to Paris where she works as a designer so that she can enjoy the nightlife with her friends.
Enter Octave, played by Fabrice Luchini. Octave is a writer who is married with one child. He also happens to be Louise's confidant. There is a great scene in Octave's home, when Louise, who is trying to resist his advances, offer's her opinion about when women should have children. Ogier looks really beautiful in this scene, and I love her hairstyle. In someway her dress demeanor is like a montage. She's impish, sexy, and refined at the same time. As Octave says she is flirty without realizing it.
This encounter with Octave shows that Louise is a woman of some intellect. For instance, her observations of life are well defined. She is conscious that some women have a limbo period in their mid- twenties, and that nature is forcing her to re-examine her own life.
As she says herself, she has been in and out of relationships since she was fifteen, and now needs time and space to be on her own. She is not prepared to make a long-term commitment to Remi just yet, and fears if she did she would lose contact with her youth.
In a way, Remi's stifling persona is partly to blame for her problem. He is several years older than her, and cannot comprehend why she does not behave like he does. She is artistic and likes socializing. While he plays tennis and doesn't. Clearly in his thirties, Remi has enjoyed his life as a twenty something, but now wants to curtail Louise of that privilege by pressing her into marriage. In essence, Louise senses that Remi is killing her youth. (There is a common thread in Rohmer's films, about lovers from different generations falling in and out of love, and Full Moon continues this theme).

When Louise eventually moves into her old Parisian apartment, she tries to convince Remi that her decision to stay in Paris during weekdays, only returning to him at weekends, would be best for both of them. Alas, her wish to have a more independent lifestyle does not last, and the loneliness of staying at home without a partner is well underlined during this segment of the film.
Desperate to have some company she meets Octave in a café bar. Where during a trip to the ladies room, she almost stumbles upon Remi. When she returns she tells Octave what she had just seen. While he claims he did not see Remi, he did observe a woman that looked rather familiar. Liking her to someone that they both met at an earlier function. But he wasn't sure. Louise looking worried recalls a joke she had made to Remi. It was a test about going out with other partners to see if they were still committed to each other.
This apparent discovery sends Louise on a rebound where she meets Bastien, a musician played by Christian Vadim. The two of them enjoy each other's company, but Octave, who also has designs on her, arrives at the same party and disapproves of Louise's newfound friendship. It is at this point that the film evolves, with some fascinating insights into the female mind.
Without doubt, Rohmer's screenplay delivers some of the best dialogue ever written for the big screen. Fabrice Luchini, who later returns in one of Rohmer's finest films
4 ADVENTURES OF REINETTE & MIRABELLE, is perfectly cast as Octave.
I have a strong suspicion that Luchini's character is really Eric Rohmer in disguise, much the same way that Jean-Pierre-Leaud played Truffaunt's altered ego in STOLEN KISSES. Viriginie Thevenet and Laszlo Szabo are also excellent in supporting roles. Lastly, one must not overlook Tcheky Karyo's portrayal of Remi. His performance as a man frustrated with Louise's outgoing personality is a memorable one.
The film ends in double irony, one intended by the screenplay, and the other following completion of the film. While Tcheky Karyo is now an international star, playing in blockbusters like The PATROIT, GOLDENEYE, and most notably as the villain in BAD BOYS, fate was not so kind to Pascale Ogier. Sadly, she died from a heart attack several months after the film was made on October 25th 1984.
Pascale not only starred in Full Moon In Paris, she was set designer as well. The Master (Rohmer) is known for letting colors flow in his films, but Ogier, obviously in the driving seat, appeared to have controlled the amount of color used in this film. The net result is a striking presentation of less is more by Ogier. Eric Rohmer has always been faithful to those who have worked with him, and no doubt had she lived he would have used Pascale Ogier again. She was a beautiful talented soul that was taken from us at just twenty-four years of age.
In a fitting appreciation of her contribution to the motion picture industry,
Pascale Ogier was awarded Best Actress at the Venice Film Festival in 1984 for her performance in Full Moon In Paris.
"Less interested in what people do,than in what is going on in their minds as they do it" 10 Oct. 2013
By technoguy - Published on Amazon.com
Format: DVD
Rohmer made variations on the same film-precisely why he organised his work into 3 related series:the Moral Tales,the Comedies and Proverbs,the Tales of the 4 Seasons.He explored love through leisurely talk around love. There is a curious absence of it in his world.His stories are more about the moral and social conditions in which love between a couple may or may not bepossible,as characters either manouevre each other into liaisons or agonise over where they belong. Following the male protagonists of the Moral Tales,the Comedies and Proverbs focussed on young heroines played by more or less unknown names,among them the late Pascale Ogier. Rohmer skillfully tacks between their thoughts and feelings using reasonabally crafted dialogue,so you get a sense of changingperspectives and modified attitudes,especially after they have had more inflexible disagreements about their socializing habits and living arrangements,when they have calmed down and utilise logic,revealing flaws in the logic. Similarly the discussion between her and Octave in the restaurant where she spies Remi and earlier he'd seen her girlfirend(not sure which one!) and he propounds his theories of them already being an item therefore encouraging her to have a place in Paris to live,would back this up,is truly deliciously teasing.

He who has two women loses his soul. He who has two houses loses his mind is the proverb Rohmer self concocts to this episode.Louise(Ogier) subconsciously wants her independence to socialise with her own friends rather than to be married to Remi.An excessive idealism about love sends her in unexpected directions.A complex heroine played with a mix of sensuality and sensitivity by Ogier(last seen in Le Pont du Nord with mother Bulle Ogier).The film is as much a tale of 2 addresses: the story teases around the paradox of simultaneously wanting the excitement and freedom of an affair alongside the safety and intimacy of a long-term relationship; the two houses turn out to be a shared one in Marne-la-Vallée and a pied-à-terre in Paris; the tragedy is that of a woman who plays the paradox and loses. Paris, as city and experience, is effortlessly captured by Rohmer's casual approach to filming on the street. The film also features a pleasing performance from Fabrice Luchini, whose unceasing intellectual ruminations provide much of the film's comedy.Les Nuits de la pleine lune is a melancholic work, shot with an almost Bresson-like austerity. The film is punctuated by long pauses of silence as the heroine Louise reflects on her situation and decides on her next course of action, whilst the sombre photography (predominantly an ethereal blue) helps to create a mood of solemnity which emphasises Louise's isolation. Pascale Ogier won the Best Actress award at Venice for her performance, only to die shortly afterwards at the tragically young age of 25.
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