The Frumious Bandersnatch (87th Precinct series Book 53) and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
Buy Used
£0.01
+ £2.80 UK delivery
Used: Very Good | Details
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: This is a very good copy with slight wear; The dust jacket is included if the book originally was published with one and could have very slight tears and rubbing;
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Frumious Bandersnatch, The: A Novel of the 87th Precinct (Mcbain, ed) Hardcover – Jan 2004


See all 20 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Hardcover, Jan 2004
£0.01
--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.


Product details

  • Hardcover: 287 pages
  • Publisher: James Bennett Pty Ltd (Jan. 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0743250346
  • ISBN-13: 978-0743250344
  • Product Dimensions: 15.6 x 2.5 x 23.5 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 3,815,867 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Ed McBain was one of the many pen names of the successful and prolific crime fiction author Evan Hunter (1926 - 2005). Born Salvatore Lambino in New York, McBain served aboard a destroyer in the US Navy during World War II and then earned a degree from Hunter College in English and Psychology. After a short stint teaching in a high school, McBain went to work for a literary agency in New York, working with authors such as Arthur C. Clarke and P.G. Wodehouse all the while working on his own writing on nights and weekends. He had his first breakthrough in 1954 with the novel The Blackboard Jungle, which was published under his newly legal name Evan Hunter and based on his time teaching in the Bronx.

Perhaps his most popular work, the 87th Precinct series (released mainly under the name Ed McBain) is one of the longest running crime series ever published, debuting in 1956 with Cop Hater and featuring over fifty novels. The series is set in a fictional locale called Isola and features a wide cast of detectives including the prevalent Detective Steve Carella.

McBain was also known as a screenwriter. Most famously he adapted a short story from Daphne Du Maurier into the screenplay for Alfred Hitchcock's The Birds (1963). In addition to writing for the silver screen, he wrote for many television series, including Columbo and the NBC series 87th Precinct (1961-1962), based on his popular novels.

McBain was awarded the Grand Master Award for lifetime achievement in 1986 by the Mystery Writers of America and was the first American to receive the Cartier Diamond Dagger award from the Crime Writers Association of Great Britain. He passed away in 2005 in his home in Connecticut after a battle with larynx cancer.

Product Description

Amazon Review

When the hottest hip-hop star nobody's ever heard of is kidnapped right in the middle of the launch party for her new video, the crime lands on the desk of 87th precinct cop Steve Carella and makes Tamar Valparaiso famous overnight. This might be the point--or not. In the capable hands of a master storyteller such as Ed McBain, who breathes new life and not a little wit into every one of his police procedurals, even a somewhat hackneyed plot is fresh and interesting. And even if the cultural references to Lewis Carroll don't intrigue you, the progress of Fat Ollie's new romance with a voluptuous cop likely will. --Jane Adams, Amazon.com --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

"Read McBain's new novel for evidence that crime and quality aren't mutually exclusive. The verbal badinage is sharp, clever and always true to life. Count the pros. There are a lot of them." (DAILY MIRROR, 16/01/04 )

"Up-to-the-minute, witty and clever." (IRISH INDEPENDENT )

'McBain, like a great wine, only seems to improve with age... an engrossing plot that will take readers on a thrill ride. The name McBain guarantees a good read.' (THE GOOD BOOK GUIDE ) --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
First Sentence
SHE CAME CRUISING downriver like the city personified, all bright lights and big bad music, banners and flags flying from bowsprits and railings, a hundred and sixty-three feet of sleek power and elegant design. Read the first page
Explore More
Concordance
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Excerpt | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By D Stuart on 13 Jan. 2004
Format: Hardcover
I first discovered Ed Mcbain more years ago than I care to admit.
He has written more than 50 books featuring the 87th Precinct and its squad of detectives. There have been some blips on the way, He who hesitates and Money,Money, but in general terms the books merit 5 stars. This is in contrast to some of his so called rivals, Patricia Cornwell, J Kellerman etc, who churn out a book a year from a more and more threadbare pallette. Bandersnatch crackles with energy from start to finish centring on the kidnap of a popsinger during the launch of her debut album. The 87th precinct detectives land the case with the help(?) of the FBI.The main protagonist is Steve Carella but there are cameo appearances from Andy Parker, Bert Kling Cotton Hawes, Lt Byrne and Fat Olly. Incidentally Olly is still looking for his book. This is a must read for fans.New readers get on the case asap.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By Hereward on 4 Sept. 2011
Format: Hardcover
Ed McBain is the master of the ensemble crime book. He invents an exciting crime - a young and rising pop star snatched by gun-wielding kidnappers from a party on a boat held to celebrate the release of her new single - and then has the officers of the 87th Precinct crack it together. The usual characters appear - the brave and dashing Steve Carella, the "large" and bigoted Fat Olly (who like most bigots in literature is a lot more fun than his straight-laced colleagues, as well as proving educational with his astonishingly wide range of ethnic insults and jokes) and the romanticly-involved Bert Kling (who admittedly does nothing all novel, for the second book in a row).

McBain's genius is in his tight plotting (no page is wasted), his skill with characters (even minor players, like a gay dancer from the pop star's troupe, are vividly drawn) and his ability to combine the gentle and enjoyable lives of his heroes with tough, brutal crime (two budding romances and a rape). The end of the book feels a little abrupt, as if missing five pages to gently wind the book down, but this is a minor complaint. If you like fast, non-nonsense crime with a little heart then you'll like this.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By biro man on 20 April 2006
Format: Paperback
I've been a dedicated 87th precinct reader for many years but I found this book a disappointment. The usual characters were there but the plot was weak and far fetched. I found myself having to skim chunks in the hope that it would pick up but it didn't. Read 'The Big Bad City' instead. It's one hundred times better than this one.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Untouchable on 9 May 2004
Format: Hardcover
The 87th Precinct is one of the most enduring series that I have ever come across, certainly the series that defined the modern police procedural. The series started in 1956 and now consists of over 50 books and is still going as strongly as ever, at its strongest when involved with the spadework that is the foundation of most police investigations.
The regular characters who have become very familiar over the many years are back again, reliable and solid detectives such as Steve Carella, Bert Kling, Cotton Hawes, Meyer Meyer, Arthur Brown and Andy Parker. Over the years their personalities and relationships have slowly been established, but they don’t really feature prominently in any one book. The focus is always on the crimes and the methods employed to solve them, so much so that each book could almost be read as a stand-alone.
The strength of the 87th Precinct books lies in the investigation techniques used to carefully piece together the puzzle of the crime. Whether it's an interview transcript in which the dialogue is fast, furious and very realistic or a search of telephone transcripts, the fascination is in the way the pieces begin to fall into place for the detectives. And on the detectives, I also enjoy the clipped dialogue between them as they work the case. It adds a certain edgy quality to the story giving a no-nonsense feel. It smacks of realism.
Of course, what isn't real is the city that the 87th Precinct can be found. Isola is the fictional setting for all books in the series, often billed as the big, bad city. It's fairly common knowledge, though that Isola is in fact Manhattan and it can be quite fun to try to work out the equivalent landmarks in and around New York City and equate them to McBain's Isola.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By Derek Brown on 12 July 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Another Ed Mcbain excellent book
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again


Feedback