• RRP: £18.99
  • You Save: £3.09 (16%)
FREE Delivery in the UK.
Only 6 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
From The Beast To The Blo... has been added to your Basket
+ £2.80 UK delivery
Used: Good | Details
Sold by Greener_Books
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: **SHIPPED FROM UK** We believe you will be completely satisfied with our quick and reliable service. All orders are dispatched as swiftly as possible! Buy with confidence!
Trade in your item
Get a £4.12
Gift Card.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

From The Beast To The Blonde: On Fairy Tales and Their Tellers Paperback – 7 Sep 1995


See all 7 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
£14.94
Paperback
"Please retry"
£15.90
£9.46 £6.51

Frequently Bought Together

From The Beast To The Blonde: On Fairy Tales and Their Tellers + The Uses of Enchantment: The Meaning and Importance of Fairy Tales (Penguin Psychology) + Once Upon a Time: A Short History of Fairy Tale
Price For All Three: £32.38

Buy the selected items together


Free One-Day Delivery for six months with Amazon Student


Product details

  • Paperback: 458 pages
  • Publisher: Vintage; New Ed edition (7 Sept. 1995)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0099479516
  • ISBN-13: 978-0099479512
  • Product Dimensions: 15.2 x 3.5 x 23.4 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 114,997 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

Review

"Can itself evoke the sense of startled wonder that these tales first gave us" (Laurel Graeber New York Times)

"She is a terrific writer and an original scholar. This is a landmark book" (Victoria Glendinning Daily Telegraph)

"Just like the tale-tellers she celebrates...she's a weaver of enchantments, each sentence is like a silken knot charming you further into her web of meanings" (Michelle Roberts Independent on Sunday)

"Consistently enlightening...this is a brilliant work: wise, witty and as magisterially omniscient as any Sibylline oracle" (Nicholas Tucker New Statesman and Society)

"Open the book at almost any page and you will find something to fascinate you" (Noel Malcolm Guardian)

Book Description

Academically rigorous and thoroughly enjoyable, Marina Warner’s study is the definitive work on the social relevance of the fairy tale.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

13 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Becky Boop on 20 April 2011
Format: Paperback
Whilst investigating fairy tales for an essay, Marina Warner's book was recommended to me, and I have never encountered such a thorough and comprehensive examination of fairy tales and their significance anywhere else! In the first half of the book, Warner discusses the significance of the teller of fairy tales, mostly as female. She examines the fairy tales as expressing ideas of the grandmother attempting to establish security for herself within her children's families, the problems of remarriage and stepmothers (common in the years during which fairy tales were created and retold over and over), adolescent girls attempting to reconcile their opinions of their mother, the Christian ideal of the silent woman and how women attempt to negate that, etc. The second half was for me even more interesting, examining the tales themselves and symbols within the tales, such as animals, hair, witches, etc. Warner covers every influence upon fairytales, from saint's tales to how fairy tales have been retold to promote certain political views. For a comprehensive, easy to read, fun, and engaging examination of fairy tales, there are really only two authors worth thinking about, Jack Zipes and Marina Warner. Buy this book - you will never look at fairy tales in the same way!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Rubbah on 23 May 2011
Format: Paperback
a brilliant book of fairytale scholarship. As another reviewer notes, it's difficult to remember you're reading a text book. Marina Warner is witty, clever and engrossing. I initally intended to read solitary chapters for when i had a spare minute- I ended up reading the whole thring to the end with 3 days. I loved that Warner doesn't only focus on the fairytales- she also tells us the story of the tellers themselves and I discovered a whole new side to fairytale scholarship. I would also recommend 'No go The Bogeyman' by the same author, in which gives monsters and bogeys the same treatment as she here gives fairytales.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Belochka on 16 Oct. 2012
Format: Paperback
With an interest in learning more about the changing cultural meanings, and what meanings have remained the same, in fairy tales across generations I bought From the Beast to the Blonde. I was greatly encouraged by the reviews here as to the book's readability whilst retaining a thorough, scholarly approach.

Marina Warner is assuredly knowledgeable in her writing, which speaks of years of investigation into the vast number of variations that have produced the tales people would be familiar with today.

However, when it comes to the writing style, I have to disagree with previous reviews and state that I find it rigorous reading. My expectation was of something a little closer to recent popular history books, such as those by Alison Weir, Jenny Uglow or Richard Aldous, but this is definitely not the case. I find the book has a decidedly academic prose style. This partial quote is from Chapter One of the 1995 edition:

"The legends Antoine de La Sale collected appeared in different forms elsewhere: Fazio degli Uberti (d.1367) had written a poem about Simon Magus, in which the wizard travels to the area to dedicate his grimoire to the pagan oracle; Aeneas Sylvius Piccolomini (d.1464), who became Pope Pius II, first identified Sibilla with the goddess of love, Venus herself."

The above excerpt is from a twenty-three line paragraph which is dense with references to names and works which would be the first time many non-academic readers (such as myself) would encounter them. That's not to say there is anything wrong with this style of writing, if you are prepared on the subject and find it compatible with the reasons for reading it. I, unfortunately, did not. The prose is just hard work to engage with for the insight it gives.
Read more ›
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Elke Notlit on 7 May 2012
Format: Paperback
This is not a review of the book per se rather the current edition of it.

I've loved Marina Warner's book since it came out and I read it at least once a year. My original copy was becoming so dog-eared and full of notes that I decided to buy a new copy. However, it has not been produced to the same standard as the original. It looks like a print-on-demand book with a flimsy cover and nasty, shiny, cheap looking pages. It's also considerably thinner. As far as I can tell the content is the same (including the plates which have just been made smaller or condensed into blocks rather than appearing more freely and illustratively throughout) it just gives the appearance of being less substantial. I understand how increasingly publishers have to default to POD, especially for small print runs, but I was disappointed by the quality of this book. Surely they can do better?

So: 5 star book and if you haven't read it I encourage you to do so; but 1 star for the quality of this particular edition.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
51 of 57 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 8 Dec. 2001
Format: Paperback
It is hard to believe that this is a text book; it is written beautifully and has become my night-time reading!
Exploring the various roles women assume within fairy tales, Warner shows a marvellous intellect and surprises you at every turn. You thought you knew fairy tales? Guess again. Never will reading the kiddies a bedtime story be the same again.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again


Feedback