Buy New

or
Sign in to turn on 1-Click ordering.
Buy Used
Used - Very Good See details
Price: £2.80

or
 
   
More Buying Choices
Have one to sell? Sell yours here
Sorry, this item is not available in
Image not available for
Colour:
Image not available

 
Tell the Publisher!
I’d like to read this book on Kindle

Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.

From Java to Ruby: Things Every Manager Should Know (Pragmatic Programmers) [Paperback]

Bruce A. Tate

RRP: £18.04
Price: £17.25 & FREE Delivery in the UK. Details
You Save: £0.79 (4%)
o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o
Usually dispatched within 10 to 13 days.
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Book Description

1 July 2006 0976694093 978-0976694090 1

As a development team, you want to be productive. You want to write flexible, maintainable web applications. You want to use Ruby and Rails. But can you justify the move away from established platforms such as J2EE? Bruce Tate's From Java to Ruby has the answers, and it expresses them in a language that'll help persuade managers and executives who've seen it all. See when and where the switch makes sense, and see how to make it.

If you're trying to adopt Ruby in your organization and need some help, this is the book for you.



Based on a decision tree (a concept familiar to managers and executives,) Java to Ruby stays above the low-level technical debate to examine the real benefits and risks to adoption.



Java to Ruby is packed with interviews of Ruby customers and developers, so you can see what types of projects are likely to succeed, and which ones are likely to fail. Ruby and Rails may be the answer, but first you need to be sure you're asking the right question. By addressing risk and fitness of purpose, Java to Ruby makes sure you're asking the right questions first.



Because technology adoption is only the beginning, Java to Ruby walks you through the whole lifecycle of prototype, ramp up, and production and deployment.


Product details

  • Paperback: 160 pages
  • Publisher: Pragmatic Bookshelf; 1 edition (1 July 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0976694093
  • ISBN-13: 978-0976694090
  • Product Dimensions: 22.8 x 19 x 1.3 cm
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 2,396,224 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

From the Publisher

If you're trying to adopt Ruby in your organization and need some help, this is the book for you.

Based on a decision tree (a concept familiar to managers and executives) Java to Ruby stays above the low-level technical debate to examine the real benefits and risks to adoption.

From Java to Ruby is packed with interviews of Ruby customers and developers, so you can see what types of projects are likely to succeed, and which ones are likely to fail. Ruby and Rails may be the answer, but first, you need to be sure you're asking the right question. By addressing risk and fitness of purpose,Java to Ruby makes sure you're asking the right questions first.

Because technology adoption is only the beginning, Java to Ruby walks you through the whole lifecycle of prototype, ramp up, and production and deployment.

About the Author

Bruce Tate is a father, kayaker, author and independent consultant in Austin, Tx. The international speaker worked for 13 years at IBM, in roles ranging from a database systems programmer to Java consultant. He left IBM to work for several startups in roles ranging from director to CTO. He now has his own consulting practice, with emphasis on lightweight development in Ruby and Java, and persistence strategies. He is the author of seven books, including the best selling Bitter series, the Jolt-winning Better, Faster, Lighter Java, and the Spring Developer's Notebook.


Sell a Digital Version of This Book in the Kindle Store

If you are a publisher or author and hold the digital rights to a book, you can sell a digital version of it in our Kindle Store. Learn more

Customer Reviews

There are no customer reviews yet on Amazon.co.uk.
5 star
4 star
3 star
2 star
1 star
Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 3.9 out of 5 stars  7 reviews
17 of 20 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An unbiased , forward thinking, and pragmatic book 3 July 2006
By Carl Graff - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
I have migrated from language to language as the software landscape has changed over the years. Pascal to C to C++ to Foxpro to PowerBuilder to Java and now to Ruby. Can you imagine where I would be at this point in my career if I were trying to develop Web Based Database programs in Turbo Pascal?

It will be almost impossible to convince some Java programmers that Ruby on Rails and LAMP in general is a better platform to do anything compared to Java. After all they have invested *HUGE* in Java and it has and is putting food on their table. But perhpas this is a moot point as I an convinced the latest generation of programmers are embaracing dynamic languages such as Ruby and Python over the older generation languages such as C++ and Java. So it is more of a question of when this will happen then if this will happen.

Bruce has been a strong Java advocate and practitioner for many years, as have many of the most influentual people in the industry from highly respected organizations such Pragmatic Programmer Inc, ThoughtWorks, and O'Reilly. So when they collectively agree that Ruby and RoR is offering huge advantages over Java in many areas it pays to not only listen but give Ruby and Ruby on Rails (Ror) a decent try-out.

I will be shocked if any Java programmer truly investes one month learning Ruby on Rails and still believes it is not a more productive and agile environment. Skimming a book and making a conclusion is a weak argument indeed. In my case it took 6 months to feel comfortable with Java and 3 weeks to feel cofortable with Ruby. I have also trained other employees in both, and the learning ratio for the students was similar. So for new programmers, IMO, Ruby is a no brainer over Java. For experienced Java programmers - well they can continue to live with the pain if they wish.

More to the book:

1. It is geared towards managers and a such is an easy read. Most managers will not even pick up a 500 page book - they just don't have time. This book can be read in a day - I did it.

2. Bruce points out the strenghts and weakness of both Java and Ruby and admits that Ruby is not yet the answer for everything - but points out that it is already a lot better in several areas of development then Java.

3. He addresses risks in great detail, too often not on developers minds, but I guarantee it is on every good manager's mind.

4. He offers advice on how to evaluate Ruby for your organization.

5. He offers praticle steps to safely transition to Ruby and Ruby on Rails and how to get a proper infrastructure set up.

I highly recommend this book to those who want to quickly gain an understanding of why Ruby and RoR may be a good fit for their organization and as a guide to getiing the ball rolling. The investment in this book is he cheapest insurance I can think of to give an organization the right balance between risk and competitive edge for the future.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars For the already-convinced 27 Oct 2007
By D. Breaux - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
Not much objective information, and despite its claims to the contrary, this book really seems to be for those who have already decided to switch to Ruby and just want to convince themselves or someone else. Most of its "evidence" seemed to be anecdotal and personal experience.

Since I hadn't yet decided that I wanted to make that move, I was looking for more objective data. For that reason, I also couldn't get myself to read the second half, which is even more for those who have decided and want to know how to get started.

I think if you fit the target audience, it would be more helpful. Because of this, and because it did make some good points about tradeoffs and trends, I still felt it was a decent book. In fairness, its focus is probably consistent with the title and aim of the book, but I still felt the material had a pretty subjective feel to it.
5 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Welcome to the conversation! 7 July 2006
By Brian Sletten - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
The only complaint I have with this book is that it is difficult to listen objectively to an Evangelical. The title of the book and its presence in the PragProg Ruby series reveal Bruce's conclusion in most cases (although don't worry, he does agree that Java may still be your answer if your pain measurements align that way).

In practice, that is a minor complaint compared to the value of this book. The negative reviews below suggest that this is more of the same and I couldn't disagree more. "Beyond Java" was a book to open developer's eyes. This book is a nod to the decision making responsibilities of managers and senior engineers.

We can no longer pretend that the engineers can be left in the corner. In the face of agile methodologies, outsourcing and increased competitive pressure, we as an industry must have open channels of communication in order to succeed. This fits in nicely with some of the other recent PragProg titles such as Venkat Subramaniam and Andy Hunt's "Practices of an Agile Developer : Working in the Real World".

In the real world, decisions have consequences, but as this book points out, so does indecision.

Bruce Tate and this book will not solve your problems (unless, perhaps if you hire him). But, by engaging managers into the discussion, he may just enable them to make the decisions that are right for them.

Read this book if you are an engineer and need to be reminded about things like risk and business value. Read this book also if you are intrigued but afraid by Ruby's perceived fringe status (it will embolden your efforts to master the language!).

Buy this book for your manager if you want him/her to see in you a proactive individual with an interest in reducing costs, increasing producitivity and the maturity to value a dialogue.

The back of the book says (in somewhat modest fonts) "Welcome to the revolution!". I would suggest that it should also say (in larger fonts) "Welcome to the conversation!"
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars It's a sales pitch, but a good one 14 Feb 2007
By Damian Wheeler - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
I picked up this book because it isn't a technical reference or a tutorial. I am a developer, but have the opportunity to drive what technology is used for projects in-house. This book shows where Java (or C or other things) still have advantages over Ruby, but in most cases shows case studies of how Ruby or Rails is introduced into a development environment successfully. It also shows where Ruby is headed and talks about what potential there is for further improvement.

Although it is candid and unbiased, I did still find it a bit preachy in places, but that is basically what marketing is. Still, this is a book that I'm handing around to people in the office as it is easy to digest and will raise awareness of Ruby before we try a pilot.
5.0 out of 5 stars Feed this to your manager 4 July 2006
By David Bock - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
I am primarily a Java developer, although I spent more than my fair share of time with management responsibilities and interfacing with 'senior management'. In recent months, I have been investigating the hype surrounding Ruby on Rails. I originally thought "Ruby isn't a 'real' language", and "Bruce is just trying to cash in on some controversy". I have now spent about 4 months doing some small rails projects, and I am looking for more opportunities to move my career in this direction. I am impressed, and I suggest any software engineer who primarily uses Java to create web-based CRUD applications to take a good look at rails.

But this book isn't really geared at developers... This book makes a compelling business case describing when to consider using ruby and rails in your organization, and when you shouldn't. For this reason, this is primarily a book that should be in the hands of a technical manager, people doing business development, etc. Ideally, those people steering the direction of work within your organization.

Don't get me wrong; a lot of developers will find this book interesting too, it just isn't a 'technical tome', and may feel disappointed by the lack of technical content. If you are a software engineer doing independent consulting, or helping to steer the technical direction of your organization, this book will give you the information you need to make compelling business-oriented points to those you need to convince. (This book will not teach you Ruby or Rails - there are other books for that).

I said above that I am "looking for more ways to move my career in this direction". This is the primary reason I like this book so much - on almost every page I see some tidbit I can use to help convince senior management to undertake pilot projects within our organization.
Were these reviews helpful?   Let us know

Customer Discussions

This product's forum
Discussion Replies Latest Post
No discussions yet

Ask questions, Share opinions, Gain insight
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 

Search Customer Discussions
Search all Amazon discussions
   


Look for similar items by category


Feedback