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From Controversy to Co-Existence: Evangelicals in the Church of England 1914-1980 [Paperback]

Randle Manwaring
4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
RRP: 32.99
Price: 31.83 & FREE Delivery in the UK. Details
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Book Description

18 April 2002
This book traces the history and theology of Evangelicals in the Church of England, both liberal and conservative, from the First World War to the appearance of the Alternative Service Book in 1980. Evangelical Anglicans stand for what they see as historic Anglicanism with its emphasis on the intrinsic veracity of scripture as the sole authority for faith and life. While it highlights the progress of the gospel through evangelism and literary output, the work does not gloss over the small-mindedness and 'sectarianism' that has sometimes characterised Evangelicals. Earlier in the twentieth century, Evangelical Anglicans saw themselves as making a 'last ditch' stand for Protestant integrity but, in mid-century, with the backing of scholarship, they came out of their 'fox holes' and eventually emerged with a redemptionist theology to embrace both church and society. This movement reached a peak with the national evangelical congresses in 1967 and 1977.

Product details

  • Paperback: 240 pages
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press (18 April 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0521892473
  • ISBN-13: 978-0521892476
  • Product Dimensions: 22 x 12 x 2 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 2,678,672 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

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Book Description

This book traces the history and theology of Evangelicals in the Church of England, both liberal and conservative, from the First World War to the appearance of the Alternative Service Book in 1980.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
First Sentence
THE EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY Evangelical Revival had run its course, the French Revolution, threatening Britain, had come and gone and England had settled down to enduring a succession of ludicrous nineteenth-century monarchs. Read the first page
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Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
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4.0 out of 5 stars Filling a Gap in Anglican Studies 28 Mar 2011
Format:Paperback
This book was written by an Evangelical who is sympathetic to the movement inside the Church of England, but who is not afraid to criticize some of the movements' flaws and idiosyncracies, especially its small mindedness. The author candidly discusses Evangelicals' isolationism and siege mentality as well as the lack of scholars and bishops emerging from the movement. The strengths and weaknesses of Evangelicals are discussed evenly. The author is also free of Evangelical triumphalism, though he is not afraid to acknowledge that the "Hand of Providence" saved England from invasion during WW II or that Billy Graham's crusades could have been used to greater effect by the Churches in England.

Evangelical Anglicans come off as a bit curious, for they seem to resemble their counterparts in Baptist and Reformed churches much more closely than anyone inside the Church of England. And though the book is quite interesting discussing a neglected topic - seriously, how many know of Evangelical Anglicans besides Wesley, Whitefield, John Newton, William Wilberforce and or Charles Simeon - 1977 was probably not the high water mark of Evangelical Anglicanism. As of 2008 1/3 of the 800,000 members of the Church of England who actually attend a church on Sunday are Evangelical. Liberals and Anglo-Cathlics have exerted much more influence in the Church of England, for it was long considered "un-Christian" by Evangelicals to seek power, prestige and influence in the C of E, but that too has slowly been altered. The future of the Anglican Communion is uncertain, but conservative Evangelicals along with Anglo-Catholics definitely have a part to play in the shaping or reshaping of the Anglican Communion. Such info is available on all the latest blogs, but this work helps fill in some important historical gaps.
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Amazon.com: 5.0 out of 5 stars  1 review
5.0 out of 5 stars A Fair and Sympathetic Portrayal 18 July 2008
By Quentin D. Stewart - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
This book was written by an Evangelical who is sympathetic to the movement inside the Church of England, but who is not afraid to criticize some of the movements' flaws and idiosyncracies. The author candidly discusses Evangelicals' isolationism and siege mentality as well as the lack of scholars and bishops emerging from the movement. The strengths and weaknesses of Evangelicals are candidly discussed. The author is free of Evangelical triumphalism, though he is not afraid to acknowledge that the Hand of Providence saved England from invasion during WW II or that Billy Graham's crusades could have been used to greater effect by the church.
The question I came away with, however, was: Why exactly do Evangelicals remain Anglican? They seem to resemble their counterparts in Baptist and Reformed churches much more closely than anyone inside the Church of England.
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