Trade in your item
Get a £3.00
Gift Card.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Fritz Lang: The Nature of the Beast Hardcover – 22 Jul 1997


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
£64.21 £9.72

Trade In Promotion



Trade In this Item for up to £3.00
Trade in Fritz Lang: The Nature of the Beast for an Amazon Gift Card of up to £3.00, which you can then spend on millions of items across the site. Trade-in values may vary (terms apply). Learn more

Product details

  • Hardcover: 560 pages
  • Publisher: Faber and Faber (22 July 1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0571191754
  • ISBN-13: 978-0571191758
  • Product Dimensions: 16.3 x 4.6 x 24.1 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 973,445 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Amazon Review

Before the auteur theory was popularized by the French cinema journal Cahiers du Cinéma, Fritz Lang--creator of such noir classics as M, Metropolis, and the later Hollywood productions of Rancho Notorious and The Big Heat--was writing and directing his own films in the 1920s. This biography of the great Viennese director is at once reverent and thorough, although it fails to resolve the larger questions surrounding Fritz Lang's life: Did he shoot his first wife in 1920? Did Lang, who was half Jewish, flee Nazi Germany before pondering an offer from Goebbels to run the German movie industry? We may never know. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
5 star
2
4 star
1
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 3 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
A good account of Fritz Lang's experience of directing 'The Woman in the Window'.

Interesting discovering that he was on the blacklist for six months which meant that no scripts or offers were coming through to keep him in employment. Like Edward G. Robinson being brought in from the cold by Cecil B. DeMille in 'The Ten Commandments', Harry Cohn from Columbia Pictures brought Lang back in from the cold by offering him 'The Blue Gardenia'. It wasn't a good film, even by his own admission, but he got the opportunity to work with Anne Baxter.

It was also interesting finding out who Lang didn't get on with such as Spencer Tracy, Henry Fonda, Lili Palmer and Gloria Grahame.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Carol on 25 July 2011
Format: Paperback
What a read! Lang lived through tumultuous events in an amazing time of change in Europe and produced some ground-breaking films. I'd really recommend this book for anyone interested in film or the cultural shifts in the Western world during and after the two World Wars.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 4 people found the following review helpful By b on 11 Nov. 2009
Format: Hardcover
One of the most fascinating figures in cinema history, Frtiz Lang moved from the Germany of the 1920s, escaped the Nazis and became a reasonably successful director in Hollywood of the 1950s. His films are defined by their exploration of good and evil, by his fascination with figures who are immoral such as Dr Mabuse or M and by his stylised self-conscious directorial techniques.

Patrick McGilligan's biography portrays a man of rigid professionalism, a determined perfectionist who is frequently reported as treating his actors like 'puppets', a man who argued with just about every producer and every studio he worked for. A monocle-wearing authoritarian who could display unexpected warmth for the acotrs he cared for. McGilligan strikes a good balance between exploring the life and values of the man himself and providing thoughtful accounts of the films he made, looking to re-evaluate their effectiveness.

This is an effective and enjoyable portrayal of a difficult and unsympathetic subject.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again


Feedback