Fright 1971

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(13) IMDb 5.8/10
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Early 1970s British horror. Susan George stars as Amanda, a young babysitter who arrives at the isolated home of Helen and Jim Lloyd (Honor Blackman and George Cole) to look after their young son, Tara (Tara Collinson), for the evening. Shortly after the couple leaves, a series of frightening events set Amanda's nerves on edge - but the real terror begins when the child's biological father (Ian Bannen) turns up at the house after escaping from a nearby lunatic asylum. Dennis Waterman co-stars.

Starring:
Susan George, Honor Blackman
Rental Formats:
DVD

Product Details

Discs
  • Feature ages_18_and_over
Runtime 1 hour 23 minutes
Starring Susan George, Honor Blackman, Ian Bannen, George Cole, John Gregson, Dennis Waterman
Director Peter Collinson
Genres Horror
Studio ELEVATION
Rental release 18 January 2010
Main languages English

Customer Reviews

3.9 out of 5 stars
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32 of 33 people found the following review helpful By All of them Witches TOP 1000 REVIEWER on 7 Feb 2010
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
A decent British thriller from 1971; Susan George is Amanda, a babysitter for Honor Blackman's (Helen's) young son. Unfortunately for Amanda this is the night that Helen's estranged psychotic maniac husband has chosen to break out of the 'mental asylum' where he has been placed after attempting to murder his wife.
Whilst it is a good little thriller it offers no suprises and few if any shocks. It is inconsistently filmed as there are many unusual and interesting shots, camera angles etc but equally some ineffective ones which telegraph the impending jumpy bit seconds in advance. Susan George puts in a nice performance but screams a little too much for my liking. Her character pretty much starts screaming from the moment Blackman and new beau George Cole drive off to the local pub and continues intermittently until the end credits role. It must have been a draining role as she is required to act both distressed and terrified for nearly the whole film and to her credit she pulls it off very well indeed.
Ian Bannen plays the psychopathic husband Brian and gives a masterclass in acting. Brian's delusionary state is excellently complimented by the directors juxtapostion of swapping Amanda for Helen as seen through the eyes of the disturbed Brian who increasingly begins to believe young Amanda is in fact his wife Helen.
Honor Blackman is a bit on the periphery here as is George Cole; Dennis Waterman turns up as a prospective sexual partner to the delightful Ms George and as with the others helps to flesh things out a bit. The scene has already been set before Brian turns up and it is therefore obvious from the off who he is and why he is there despite his initial attempt to pose as a concerned neighbour.
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Mr. A. Watt on 8 Mar 2010
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
By modern standards the pace of this movie would appear to be slow. Along the way clues appear to give some indication regarding waht is about to happen. The acting is generally good and although the viewer has a fair idea about what might happen, the timing isn't always what you might expect. I suppose the biggest surprise comes at the climax so I won't spoil that with details.
Susan George does a competent girl next door in a crisis performance, though the pace of the film must have made it difficult for her.
Sometimes it is just nice to watch a movie that hasn't been stuffed with often pointless special effects.
It isn't quite good enough for four stars, but 3 might be just a bit stingy. Because I like looking at Susan in the era of the miniskirt, my personal score would be 3.5 stars, but it isn't the sort of film you could watch over and over again.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Spike Owen TOP 500 REVIEWER on 7 Oct 2013
Format: DVD
Fright is directed by Peter Collinson and written by Tudor gates. It stars Susan George, Ian Bannen, Honor Blackman, George Cole, Dennis Waterman and John Gregson. Music is by Harry Robinson and cinematography by Ian Wilson.

A young babysitter is terrorised by an escaped mental patient.

It plays as stock fair now, but Fright is undoubtedly influential in the line of "maniac stalks girl alone" movies. But! That is no gauge of quality because in spite of some good initial ground work in the first half, the pic fails to deliver on its promise. Susan George as Amanda, in fetching mini-dress, falls prey to an unhinged Ian Bannen as Brian who literally has come home.

The build up consists of Amanda turning up for her babysitting assignment and finding the lady of the house (Blackman over acting big time) on tender hooks. Once Amanda is alone in the house noises are used as scare tactics, Waterman turns up as a horny boyfriend and soon gets sent packing with a flea in his ear, and then the lights go out and Brian turns up thinking that Amanda is his wife (Blackman who is out doing some awful dancing with Cole).

General hysterics ensue as Amanda becomes a simpering wreck whilst trying to hold it together long enough to keep the baby safe from harm. Bannen goes into over drive convincing us he's mad, which leads to some very unsettling scenes as Amanda is put through a nightmare (1971 really saw George at the mercy of film makers!) until the conclusion which comes with the inevitable outcome.

Horror really wasn't Collinson's forte, and his choices in the genre tended to revolve around a woman in peril, and that's kind of the problem with Fright, it just comes off as unsavoury (do I smell misogyny?).
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Mr. Jonathon T. Beckett on 14 Oct 2008
Format: DVD
I remember watching this in the dead of night on ITV in the early 1980's. Now after a gap of around 25 years, I've watched it again.
Its a decent enough little thriller, and could be said to have influenced many babysitter in peril horror films. It does have a couple of genuine shocks, and the two central performances by Susan George and Ian Bannen as victim and tormentor are excellent. The sudden shifts between fantasy and reality, past and present in the mind of mentally ill Brian are also handled well.
There a couple of reasons that the film doesnt score higher with me.The scenes in the club/resteraunt(where some very dodgy dancing takes place) and the police station are not so good, and the film drags a bit when it leaves the pivotal location. George Cole gives an unusually wooden performance, but these are minor quibbles.
So, overall an interesting little thriller/horror the plot of which would become commonplace in the horror genre a few years later. 4 out of 5
The DVD transfer is of excellent quality
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