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Fresh Cream [Original recording reissued, Original recording remastered]

Cream Audio CD
4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)
Price: 7.99 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over 10. Details
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Product details

  • Audio CD (9 Mar 1998)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Original recording reissued, Original recording remastered
  • Label: Commercial Marketing
  • ASIN: B0000067L1
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Audio Cassette  |  Vinyl  |  MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 17,933 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. I Feel Free
2. N.S.U.
3. Sleepy Time Time
4. Dreaming
5. Sweet Wine
6. Spoonful

Product Description

BBC Review

Laid down at the height of the UK blues boom, Fresh Cream covers the kind of territory you might expect from three of the most respected players on the scene at the time. With Clapton fresh just from his time with John Mayall, Ginger Baker leaving behind the R'n'B backwaters of Graham Bond Organisation, and a woefully under-employed Jack Bruce hightailing it from the increasingly pop-leaning Manfred Mann, the electric blues was their natural turf.

Highlights include the racing harmonica work-out, and the call and response excitements on Muddy Waters’ “Rollin’ and Tumblin,’” a spine-tingled vocal on the Willie Dixon classic, “Spoonful” as well as the self-penned “Sleepy Time Time” which gives Clapton a free hand to wake up all and sundry. The traditional standard, "Cat’s Squirrel" is given a rousing treatment, showing how well these players meshed. Only a particularly anaemic stroll through Robert Johnson’s “Four Until Late”, sounds like a side filler.

What lifts this album beyond the blues-tinged pigeon-hole are some superior pop songs brought along for the ride.

It’s well-neigh impossible to hear the opening bars of “I Feel Free” without conjuring up images of dolly birds, hip young guys in new threads full of finger-clicking coolness hopping aboard one of those brand new Mini cars and soaring off for groovy times. Cultural cliché’s aside, given the amount of musical information that’s been packed into those two minutes and fifty-five seconds, it’s a wonder the thing doesn’t implode under the weight of its own inventiveness.

The rhythmic ambitions and ambiguity of “NSU” adds to the thrill, and if some of it doesn’t quite work as well as it should (Bruce’s dreary “Dreaming” is especially lame), “Sweet Wine” with its psyche-tinged lyrics and the heavy breakout offers a clear hint of what was to come. Overshadowed by its more famous successor (1967’s Disraeli Gears) and their reputation lengthy improvisations during which mighty civilisations would rise and fall, their debut captures one of those elusive moments in music when blues, pop and rock magically starts to coalesce to create something brand new. --Sid Smith

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Product Description

CD

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
4.5 out of 5 stars
Most Helpful Customer Reviews
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant, timeless debut... 14 Jun 2009
Format:Audio CD
When you set out to be "the best", as Cream did, you'd better be sure you deliver. And, after a very odd start with their first single "Wrapping Paper" - that left those who hadn't seen them live wondering what all the fuss was about - deliver they did with an album that remains one of the most inventive and powerful debuts of all time. Still exciting forty years on (and helped by the inclusion of "I Feel Free" which inexplicably was only released as a single in the UK despite being recorded in the same sessions) its combination of driving blues and Eric Clapton's incredible "barrier bending" guitar playing - evidenced to perfection in their stunning interpretation of Skip James' "I'm So Glad" - took the British R&B scene by storm and set a precedent that raised expectations of what was to come beyond all reasonable levels.

There was indeed more to come, but while much of "Disraeli Gears" and parts of "Wheels of Fire" were as good, if not better, "Fresh Cream" is infused with the sheer enthusiasm of a group getting it right for the first time. And, like all similarly brilliant debut albums, that's what shines through and makes it timeless.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant, timeless debut... 16 Jan 2007
Format:Audio CD
When you set out to be "the best", as Cream did, you'd better be sure you deliver. And, after a very odd start with their first single "Wrapping Paper" - that left those who hadn't seen them live wondering what all the fuss was about - deliver they did with an album that remains one of the most inventive and powerful debuts of all time. Still exciting forty years on (and helped by the inclusion of "I Feel Free" which inexplicably was only released as a single in the UK despite being recorded in the same sessions) its combination of driving blues and Eric Clapton's incredible "barrier bending" guitar playing - evidenced to perfection in their stunning interpretation of Skip James' "I'm So Glad" - took the British R&B scene by storm and set a precedent that raised expectations of what was to come beyond all reasonable levels.

There was indeed more to come, but while much of "Disraeli Gears" and parts of "Wheels of Fire" were as good, if not better, "Fresh Cream" is infused with the sheer enthusiasm of a group getting it right for the first time. And, like all similarly brilliant debut albums, that's what shines through and makes it timeless.
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20 of 24 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Seminal. 12 Dec 2000
By Mr. Colin Rankin VINE VOICE
Format:Audio CD
Two rock albums in my younger days typified to me great rock music......one was the first Led Zeppelin album.....the other was this...which pre-dated Zeppelin by about 3 years.When I first heard this my mind and musical tastes went into overdrive.Until this album I was totally focused on the Beatles and loved them!!!Fresh Cream showed me something else; but it wasn't until Clapton's extraordinary 'Tales Of Brave Ulysses'on Creams next album,'Disraeli Gears' that I really understood the revolution that was going on in music.Fortunately or unfortunately the Beatles have dominated and have set a superb standard.However,there were many other great bands whose influence has waned as a result.Any new band picking up on this will make a HUGE killing!....This album is a great starting point!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
By Victor HALL OF FAME TOP 50 REVIEWER
Format:Audio CD
In 1966 Ginger Baker, Jack Bruce and Eric Clapton were well known and well respected musicians who had each earned a reputation working in a variety of outfits. They decided to get together and form the first supergroup in the shape of Cream. Based on the British blues of the early `60s that they had each done so much to make popular, this new group harnessed their great talents to take the form to a new level, with infusions of rock and almost jazz like experimentation.

Clapton especially was never better than here. Each of the three had a tremendous ego, and a desire to shine brighter than the other two. This really pushed all three to make some of the best music in their careers. I don't know how it came across to audiences when it was first released, but I know that when I first heard it the album was a complete revelation. Having grown up in the `80s with parents who only ever listen to Cliff Richard, when someone first played me this record it was as though the doors had been opened and I realised there was a world of really good music out there, worth getting excited about. It was fresh, exciting, music that reached into the soul and jangled the nerves. Full of pounding drums, inventive bass lines, Clapton's searing guitar, Bruce's vocals this was the music that got me into music and thus holds a special place in my heart.

Hyperbole and personal feeling apart, this is a classic slice of British blues, fusing the worlds of blues, rock and jazz into a coruscating whole that makes this one of the best albums to come out of the genre. Classic stuff, 5 stars.
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12 of 16 people found the following review helpful
Format:Audio CD
Let's not be sentimental or nostalgic about this, it really does sound very dated, not least because of the very primitive stereo engineering. And of course on the basis of this album you would have to conclude that they hadn't yet found their 'sound' as a band. But already by November '66 the authentic sound could certainly be heard in the BBC recordings except that in the earliest Bruce hadn't begun to use sustain on his bass. They also evidently had that sound in live public performance in March 1967 as is evidenced by the recordings of 'NSU'(3.53) and 'I'm So Glad'(4.40) made at the Konserthusen Stockholm both of which at one time were available on two different sem-official releases called 'Stepping Out' and 'Eric Clapton's Cream'. It seems obvious therefore that they had the sound from the beginning when they got together to jam at Baker's house in Neasden. So why didn't it get onto this first album?

This album with its highly artificial studio production is really only of some minor historical interest because of its prominence at the time for commercial reasons, which unfortunately has led to it being of undue interest to 'academic' rock historians of the blues and its new white exponents or 'appropriators. The pity is that this album was made so early and in the Soho of 'Tin-Pan Alley' - even though 'early' here means a matter of months. It saddens me still to see this album referred to in popular discophile reference books, and academic discographies and footnotes, where mention of this 'Spoonful' is made but no mention of the 'Spoonful' from 'Live at the Filmore' or the live numbers on 'Goodbye Cream'. Every time I see this sort of misdirection and misemphasis I know they haven't understood the nature of Cream's (white) 'appropriation' of the blues at all.
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Most Recent Customer Reviews
5.0 out of 5 stars Review
Bought the album when it originally came out & loved it & everything else Cream have done, Bought the CD so I can play it in the car, excellent CD with bonus tracks. Read more
Published 4 months ago by clive fokes
5.0 out of 5 stars eric
Kind seller professional.
Watch out for the customer!
Quick to contacts and answers.
Recommended to all friends and relatives.
great
old style
Published on 3 April 2011 by masmagi
3.0 out of 5 stars Could have been so much better with less primitive stereo engineering...
Nearly all the numbers on this 1967 first album suffer from the extremely unnatural and artificial sounding stereo separation and artificial production. Read more
Published on 5 Jan 2010 by Basilides
5.0 out of 5 stars Cream's best record?
'Fresh Cream' was Cream's first release, recorded within a few months of them getting together. It was probably one of the first 'progressive blues' records and as such sounded... Read more
Published on 17 Sep 2008 by G. E. Harrison
5.0 out of 5 stars The first album from the first great power trio in rock
It is rather ironic that Cream stands out in the history of music as the first great power trio in rock 'n' roll. Read more
Published on 10 Dec 2005
3.0 out of 5 stars Interesting and enjoyable...
Cream's first effort was a very varied but uneven effort. In here you will find great sixties pop ("I Feel Free"), sixties pop ("Dreaming"), hard blues... Read more
Published on 15 Jun 2001 by Top Cat
5.0 out of 5 stars Pure class from the band which invented the heavy rock genre
This & the bluesbreakers featuring Eric Clapton album was the reason, that Jimi Hendrix agreed as a condition to come to England if he was promised a meeting with Clapton!
Published on 6 Dec 2000
4.0 out of 5 stars A good start, but the best was yet to come.
Cream's debut album stuck rigidly to their orginal intentions of being a blues based band as is shown here. Read more
Published on 16 Jun 2000
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