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Frequency Unknown [Explicit]
 
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Frequency Unknown [Explicit]

23 April 2013 | Format: MP3

£7.49 (VAT included if applicable)
Buy the CD album for £13.76 and get the MP3 version for FREE. Does not apply to gift orders.
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Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
1
3:36
30
2
3:35
30
3
4:35
30
4
3:53
30
5
3:48
30
6
3:24
30
7
4:38
30
8
4:22
30
9
4:12
30
10
6:14
30
11
4:26
30
12
5:24
30
13
5:22
30
14
5:45
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Product details

  • Original Release Date: 23 April 2013
  • Release Date: 23 April 2013
  • Label: Deadline Music
  • Copyright: (c) 2013 Deadline Music
  • Total Length: 1:03:14
  • Genres:
  • Format: Explicit Lyrics
  • ASIN: B00BVJYXE8
  • Average Customer Review: 2.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (23 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 66,124 in Albums (See Top 100 in Albums)

Customer Reviews

2.9 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

33 of 38 people found the following review helpful By Sparky Mead on 9 May 2013
Format: MP3 Download
I do not consider this a Queensryche record. The evidence I present to support this theory is fairly strong. Firstly, the record was written by Geoff Tate and a team of external writers who have never been members of Queensryche (although, sadly, Jason Slater has been a negative influence for a while now...). Secondly, the members of the 'band' that Geoff calls his Queensryche had minimal input to the album - keyboardist Randy Gane has a shared writing credit and only plays on 6 tracks (5 as a keyboardist), guitarists Robert Sarzo and Kelly Grey play only a solo on 1 track each, drummer Simon Wright has 2 tracks and the ever enthusiastic Rudy Sarzo has a grand total of 3 tracks. Not really what you'd call a 'band effort'. In fact, aside from any rehearsals, the current band will never have played any of these songs together. With that in mind, how can you possibly call this a Queensryche album. Ah, but as I write that line I can hear the usual suspects on the Facebook page that was hijacked all shout as one "Geoff is Queensryche!" Um, no...one man does not a band make. Unfortunately, this is painfully evident in this release...

I'll go on the record to say, I got this on the release date and I have given this a thorough listen through both speakers and headphones - I have lived with this album for a week to try and give an honest appraisal. I'll start with - it is not as bad as Dedicated to Chaos. Granted, that doesn't say much, but it is a start. What we have here are ten new songs (or old castaway demos that have been sat on Jason Slater's shelves depending on who you listen to) and four re-recorded classics, which have proved the most controversial it would seem. Let's start with the new songs...
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By cougarric on 4 Oct. 2013
Format: Audio CD
Being a QR fan since Rage For Order, I have seen the rapid ascent to musical perfection slowly turn into turgid mediocrity.

The last few years have revealed a massive rift between Geoff Tate and the rest of the band. The departure of creative genius Chris Degarmo now seemingly explained. This coincided with the decline of a once amazing band.

Now, following the sacking of Tate, both sides are battling each other for the right to be Queensryche. This shouldn't be settled in court, it should be down to the fans.

Tate's album sounds like a man trying to reconnect with the fans he has let down for the past 10 years or so. Bringing in some "names" to create some sort of "supergroup" a la Whitesnake in the 80's. It fails for one simple reason. Queensryche have never been about "names", they have been about the music. Tate taking over the band's output ruined that and sent the band spiralling downhill.

Geoff needs to move on and be the solo star that he was quite happy to try to be before. As a massive fan I want him to let the new QR get on with what they are doing - restoring the legacy of a once superb band.

Rant over. Geoff, you were amazing for the band, but it's time to move on.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Agma on 4 May 2014
Format: Audio CD
Vulgar and spiteful album from a venomous Geoff Tate, and it is everybit as nasty and disgusting as you can imagine. On the face of it, Frequency Unknown could have, and probably should have:- been a golden opportunity for G.Tate to prove musical ability and abdicate at least some of the sole responsibility for a string of lackluster albums before it. Instead, a compilation of rushed and fabricated tracks assisted by a childish advertisement of bitterness has inevitably backfired, leaving a trail of musical destruction surrounding it and a credibility in tatters.

Whilst there are some interesting ideas thrown about the place, none of them are helmed together with any kind of real conviction, and the quality of Tate's voice throughout is highly questionable. Having said all that, only one song here could be deemed as anything close to the high quality of the Queensryche legacy:- and that song is "Weight of the world" which does uphold some merit. The rest is frankly throwaway generic metal and a black asterisk of the Queensryche brand. It does however, surpass the disaster of "Dedicated to chaos" which indeed, isn't saying a great deal positive there.

Fortunately, with the recent closure of the court case settlement, Tate will no longer be able to release anymore albums like this in the future using the name, and I guess that is a positive outcome for the remaining band. Still, in the metal music scene, beloved bands are expected to always uphold the same passion, competance, conviction, chemistry and genuinity as the fans would relate to. This album demonstrates none of these core values and none the less:- exposes the royalty generator and budget economics the product and it's revolving b-rate sham represents.
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Format: Audio CD
As it was mentioned many times before the production of the album is terrible but it is still a good Geoff Tate solo album. Not Queensryche
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5 of 7 people found the following review helpful By P. Worrall on 6 Jun. 2013
Format: Audio CD
A lot has been said about this album that it's difficult to add anything new. An amusing afternoon can be had trawling through the reviews on Amazon.com, some blindly praising it and some blindly slating it, but from listening to this album myself, I feel the criticism it's receiving is somewhat justified.

It's hard to ignore all the shenanigans that has surrounded this album, and in some ways the album shouldn't be judged on it, but, on the other hand, it has been born out of the turmoil and it wouldn't exist without it, so I think the background is important. Because of this, Frequency Unknown, is being beaten down because of what it stands for, which is a rushed, blatant cash in and attempted claim for the QR name with little regard to the fan base. Even before you listen to a note, the reasons behind this release just grind your gears.

From the drubbing on amazon.com I was expecting a train wreck, however, for myself, the original songs are not as bad as that. Highlights include Cold, Slave and In The Hands Of God, but on the whole, the bland, unadventurous, passionless nature of the song writing leaves the whole experience flat and uninspired, Give It To you and Everything especially. The eclectic collection of guest musicians, presumably brought on board to meet the deadline, jar slightly as some performances and solos do not gel in this style of radio styled hard rock. On top of that is the flat, demo style production, a production job so bad that the record company commissioned remixes available to those who have bought the album (one has to like the songs first before bothering with a remix). The only other time I have heard of this is when Nevermore recorded Enemies Of Reality, oddly enough, Kelly Gray produced this album.
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