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4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
Price: 11.31 & FREE Delivery in the UK. Details
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Frequently Bought Together

Freak Out! + We're Only In It For The Money + Hot Rats
Price For All Three: 30.33

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Product details

  • Audio CD (30 July 2012)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: UMC
  • ASIN: B008B37CB8
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Audio Cassette  |  Vinyl  |  MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 6,940 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Listen to Samples and Buy MP3s

Songs from this album are available to purchase as MP3s. Click on "Buy MP3" or view the MP3 Album.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         

Samples
Song Title Time Price
Listen  1. Hungry Freaks, Daddy 3:300.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  2. I Ain't Got No Heart 2:350.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  3. Who Are The Brain Police? 3:330.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  4. Go Cry On Somebody Else's Shoulder 3:410.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  5. Motherly Love 2:450.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  6. How Could I Be Such A Fool 2:130.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  7. Wowie Zowie 2:530.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  8. You Didn't Try To Call Me 3:180.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  9. Anyway The Wind Blows 2:550.99  Buy MP3 
Listen10. I'm Not Satisfied 2:380.99  Buy MP3 
Listen11. You're Probably Wondering Why I'm Here 3:380.99  Buy MP3 
Listen12. Trouble Every Day 5:500.99  Buy MP3 
Listen13. Help, I'm A Rock 4:430.99  Buy MP3 
Listen14. It Can't Happen Here 3:560.99  Buy MP3 
Listen15. The Return Of The Son Of Monster Magnet12:19Album Only


Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
4.4 out of 5 stars
Most Helpful Customer Reviews
21 of 22 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Unsurpassable debut 13 April 2002
Format:Audio CD
This is an album that stands for itself. I cannot imagine the face of music without it, true, but then music still is a very ugly place to go to without Frank Zappa.
The snarling distorted guitars; the parody-close-to-pastiche of Any Way the Wind Blows and You Didn't Try to Call Me; the social commentary of Trouble Every Day; the dada of Help I'm a Rock; the liner notes; the lyrics (oh! the lyrics!).
Amazing, if anything, because it prefigures everything Zappa went on to do, that is to say, stayed true to. It is one of those immense ironies of art that this is his debut record (a debut on the scale of Iris Murdoch's 'Under the Net').
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars These Mothers is crazy 17 May 2008
Format:Audio CD
Let's be plain about this, if you don't know the music of Frank Zappa but are somehow intrigued and want to know more, you should start with 'Apostrophe' or maybe 'Hot Rats'.

If however, you know a little Zappa and want to find out about his roots then here's a good place to start. This album is quite different from all the stuff that came after. The reason for this is that there's some pretty personal stuff on here. On subsequent releases he developed a sort of highly articulate barrier based on a number of techniques. In matters of a personal nature he later directed his attentions to other groups of people and manufactured the kind of 'Frank' he wanted people to see. In short, after this album he was totally in control. He was the 'Central Scrutiniser'.

The darkly cynical and angry track 'I Ain't Got No Heart' is a real song about real feelings. And there are more. 'How Could I be Such a Fool' and 'I'm Not Satisfied' also reveal the bitterness and betrayal he had experienced as a result of relationships with a woman or women unnamed.

This CD also contains plenty of the stuff we all know about Frank but in embryo form. Groovy paranoia (Who Are The Brain Police), Teen parody (Wowie Zowie) and statements of intent (Hungry Freaks, Daddy).

Then, surfacing like a monstrously embarrasing reality check point, we are treated to 'Trouble Every Day' - a wake up call to bigots and racists of every colour. This is the most serious political piece that Frank Zappa ever wrote. His rage at the ramifications of a repressed people driven to fighting in the streets goes way beyond the silly pseudo-revolutionary rants of his contemporaries.
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17 of 18 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Zappa's Ground-Breaking Debut 14 Oct 2006
By G. Don Fielder VINE VOICE
Format:Audio CD
The majority of artists test the water with their first few releases, then (if they've got the talent) do something ground-breaking. For his debut, Frank didn't just break ground; he picked up a jackhammer and drilled away the foundation of popular music as we then knew it, replacing it with a hearty dose of ugliness, humour and controversy, packed into the first ever rock double-vinyl release (initially released in the UK as a single album without tracks 12-15, which were far too dangerous!). Forty years on (yes, nearly half a century!), this remains an essential rock album. The acid test: you could still put this on the CD player at the end of a party when your best friends are the only ones remaining, and elicit the response "Mate - what the hell IS this stuff?". The show kicks off with the Stones' Satisfaction-influenced "Hungry Freaks, Daddy", wherein Frank gets straight to work with some cutting lyrics about the state of the nation, continues with the savage honesty of "I Ain't Got No Heart" and the scary "Who are the Brain Police?", then a bit of his beloved doo-wop, some irony-laden wall-of-sound love ballads decorated with vibes, soaring brass and percussion arrangements, the Dylanesque "Trouble Every Day", then climaxing with a twenty minute plateful of general weirdness in the closing three tracks. Curiously, the album's lead vocals are credited to Ray Collins, but my experience tells me without doubt that on many of these songs, Frank is the dominant singer, with Collins a co-vocalist taking the occasional lead. In fact, out of all 70+ albums, Freak Out contains some of Frank's best vocal work and is probably the only place you will find him singing a genuine love song. Listen to "How Could I be such a Fool" - you may laugh but this is perfect Scott Walker/Marc Almond territory! Read more ›
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Zappa's Ground-Breaking Debut 15 April 2007
By G. Don Fielder VINE VOICE
Format:Audio CD
The majority of artists test the water with their first few releases, then (if they've got the talent) do something ground-breaking. For his debut, Frank didn't just break ground; he picked up a jackhammer and drilled away the foundation of popular music as we then knew it, replacing it with a hearty dose of ugliness, humour and controversy, packed into the first ever rock double-vinyl release (initially released in the UK as a single album without tracks 12-15, which were far too dangerous!). Forty years on (yes, nearly half a century!), this remains an essential rock album. The acid test: you could still put this on the CD player at the end of a party when your best friends are the only ones remaining, and elicit the response "Mate - what the hell IS this stuff?". The show kicks off with the Stones' Satisfaction-influenced "Hungry Freaks, Daddy", wherein Frank gets straight to work with some cutting lyrics about the state of the nation, continues with the savage honesty of "I Ain't Got No Heart" and the scary "Who are the Brain Police?", then a bit of his beloved doo-wop, some irony-laden wall-of-sound love ballads decorated with vibes, soaring brass and percussion arrangements, the Dylanesque "Trouble Every Day", then climaxing with a twenty minute plateful of general weirdness in the closing three tracks. Curiously, the album's lead vocals are credited to Ray Collins, but my experience tells me without doubt that on many of these songs, Frank is the dominant singer, with Collins a co-vocalist taking the occasional lead. In fact, out of all 70+ albums, Freak Out contains some of Frank's best vocal work and is probably the only place you will find him singing a genuine love song. Listen to "How Could I be such a Fool" - you may laugh but this is perfect Scott Walker/Marc Almond territory! Read more ›
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Most Recent Customer Reviews
4.0 out of 5 stars Not so Flower Punks
Some pieces still sound strong and experimental today. Others, not so. Zappa's guitar sound is very weedy and the songs sound more as if they were produced in the 'Beat Era' than... Read more
Published 2 months ago by chris elliott
4.0 out of 5 stars Who are the brain police?
Who indeed. There are times when all I want to do is go home to my Mothers. Freak Out! is a classic.
Published 16 months ago by Gerson
1.0 out of 5 stars Emperor's New Clothes?
Generally hailed as a masterpiece by a genius composer, I listened to this with anticipation, even excitement, and with open ears. Sadly, I found it to be badly dated. Read more
Published 16 months ago by JRE
4.0 out of 5 stars new version??
No reviewer here seems to be referencing the new 2012 release. Most of the Zappa albums have undergone serious upgrading in the latest issue. Read more
Published 19 months ago by 70s
5.0 out of 5 stars A classic
One of the greatest rock albums ever... an original, crazy, parody statement about the state of things in the US during the heyday of rock and roll.
Published 19 months ago by Douglas C. Lippoldt
5.0 out of 5 stars Genius at play
Frank Zappa was a composer like no other, both prolific and brilliant, his work self-consciously avoided specific stylistic restraints and virtually broke all the rules in the... Read more
Published on 20 Aug 2010 by Daniel Margrain
5.0 out of 5 stars Masterpiece!
The sound quality would make Phil Spector proud. This is the one of the two albums that influenced the overrated 'Sergeant Pepper'. The second being 'Pet Sounds'. Read more
Published on 20 July 2000
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