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Franny and Zooey [Paperback]

J. Salinger
4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (39 customer reviews)

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Book Description

4 Aug 1994
Two wonderful stories about members of the Glass family by the author of ‘The Catcher in the Rye’. The first story takes place in downtown New Haven during the weekend of ‘the Yale game’ and follows Franny Glass on a date with her collegiate boyfriend. The second focuses on Zooey Glass, a somewhat emotionally toughened genius. As his younger sister Franny hits an emotional crisis in her parents' Manhattan living room, Zooey comes to her aid, offering love, understanding, and words of sage advice.


Product details

  • Paperback: 144 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin; Rev Ed edition (4 Aug 1994)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0140237526
  • ISBN-13: 978-0140237528
  • Product Dimensions: 19.4 x 12.4 x 1.2 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (39 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 365,088 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

J D Salinger was born in 1919. He grew up in New York City, and wrote short stories from an early age, but his breakthrough came in 1948 with the publication in The New Yorker of 'A Perfect Day for Bananafish'. The Catcher in the Rye was his first and only novel, published in 1951. It remains one of the most translated, taught and reprinted texts, and has sold some 65 million copies. It was followed by three other books of short stories and novellas, the most recent of which was published in 1963. He lives in Cornish, New Hampshire.

Product Description

About the Author

J D Salinger was born in 1919. He grew up in New York City, and wrote short stories from an early age, but his breakthrough came in 1948 with the publication in The New Yorker of 'A Perfect Day for Bananafish'. The Catcher in the Rye was his first and only novel, published in 1951. It remains one of the most translated, taught and reprinted texts, and has sold some 65 million copies. It was followed by three other books of short stories and novellas, the most recent of which was published in 1963. He lives in Cornish, New Hampshire.

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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews
34 of 34 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Witty, wordy & wonderful 19 May 2006
By Mrs. A. C. Whiteley VINE VOICE
Format:Paperback
Critically denounced on publication by several eminent commentators of the time (Updike, Didion, etc), Franny and Zooey has, over the past few years, enjoyed something of an academic rehabilitation. (In particular, see Janet Malcolm's excellent article for the New York Review of Books, Volume 48, Number 10 which can be found at www.nybooks.com/articles/14272). The book consists of a short story and novella entitled Franny and Zooey respectively. (They were originally published separately in the New Yorker, two years apart).

`Franny' focuses on a date with her boyfriend Lane, just prior to an American football game he is anxious not to miss. In contrast to the effusive affection expressed in the letter she sent him before this occasion, she finds him increasingly irritating. This is exacerbated by his boasting about his recent Flaubert essay. For his part, Lane cannot understand why she is not eating, nor can he account for her growing nervousness and disengagement. Twice she has to excuse herself, seemingly unwell. It transpires that she has been reading a devotional book entitled `Way of the Pilgrim'. This has inspired her to endlessly repeat the `Jesus Prayer' in the hope of emulating its hero by praying so incessantly that it is as subconscious an act as her heart beating. Indeed, after the second time, she is found collapsed still murmuring the prayer.

The action in `Zooey' takes place just a few days later. Franny has returned home to recuperate. Zooey, Franny's elder brother, has been enjoying a leisurely soak while rereading a four-year-old letter from his brother, Buddy (who is also the absent narrator). Quite preachy, it exhorts him to better appreciate their mother, Bessie, and explains part of the reason for the family difficulty in coping with other people.
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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Indulgent yet perfect 17 Oct 2006
Format:Paperback
Salinger described this as a "pretty flimsy book". The vast majority of writers out there should be so lucky if they can write something as wonderful as this. The attention to detail lays a spell over me every time I read this book, which I have done on a regular basis for the past fifteen or so years. It is incredibly indulgent; the decription of the Glass living room is little more than an artsy list, yet it's so wonderfully delivered that you are right there, staring at the root beer stain from behind the couch. The three characters; the frail, needy Franny (a fifties version of Charlotte in Lost in Translation), acrid, hyper-critical Zooey, and their irrepressible mother deserve each other in more ways than one. Basically, it's crunch time in the young life of Franny Glass, who has found that she cannot cope outside the cosy, intellectual confines of her own family, with more than one ghost, one of whom (Buddy) is still alive, yet seems more intent in lecturing them from beyond the metaphorical grave of his cabin in the back of beyond. In an effort to counter the "phonies" at college, she has taken to a sort of ascetic lifestyle, the focal point of which is a spiritual book, revolving around an endlessly recited prayer. Both brother and mother callously try to bludgeon this out of her, one with kind offers of chicken broth, and the other, with long, detailed critiques of her methods. The poor girl copes in the only way she can; by crying lots and blowing her nose. But you learn a vast amount about this family, and you discover they are not so eccentric as their methods and choices of self-expression might at first suggest. In short, both brother and sister discover something, and it's more than worth discovering along with them. There are many great books, but there are no books like Franny and Zooey, and there won't be again. Catcher was his greatest achievement, without a doubt, but I prefer this book. Although, these days, I seem to side more and more with the mother!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Salinger's witty, deft dealing with humanity 17 Feb 2009
Format:Paperback
How can one pin down the ouevre of such an elusive and enigmatic writer as JD Salinger?

'Franny and Zooey' is composed of a short story and a novella - both exquisitely wrought and complementing each other - concerning the existential crisis and emotional breakdown of Franny Lane, the youngest of seven precociously talented and intelligent children.

'Franny' - the short story - brilliantly depicts the young woman's date with her pompous boyfriend, and already the themes that one would expect from Salinger's teasing, tantalising portion of published works are visible: existential anxiety over what exactly is 'fitting in,' the words and actions of the 'phonies' and how they impact on sensitive people such as Franny.

'Zooey', whilst still being concerned with Franny, portrays her brother's growing concern over his younger sister, who has taken to moping around the house in an emotional lethargy following her nervous episode documented in `Franny'. Zooey, at the rather comic instigation of his mother while he is having a bath, realises that he must help her get over it all in some way, though until the end of the story, doesn't seem to know how to. It is a beautifully-measured novella which takes its time, and reveals through its inaction rather than action.

Both pieces are witty, wordy and brilliantly realised. What I particularly enjoy is how engaging Salinger's style is, how he can deal with important themes relating to humanity and the individual's place within it, with the greatest and ease and enjoyment on the part of the reader. Indeed, many people have commented on the underlying allusions to Zen Buddhism and other spiritualism: huge themes that are dealt with in a wryly understated and very human fashion.
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Most Recent Customer Reviews
2.0 out of 5 stars Franny and Zooey
I am a great fan of J.Salinger, but found this book a little too 'off the wall'.for my taste.
However,I would recommend it to other Salinger fans as they might like it. Read more
Published 2 months ago by Pauline W.
5.0 out of 5 stars Work of genius
This must be one of my favourite novels that I've read in a really long time. Everyone's read Salinger's Catcher in the Rye, and almost everyone loves the book, so much so that you... Read more
Published 8 months ago by S. Shamma
3.0 out of 5 stars Over-rated author
Recently re-read Catcher In The Rye, and like this, one wonders what all the fuss was about. Some "fine" writing, but no energy or urgency. Silly spoilt characters. Read more
Published 13 months ago by E. A. Donovan
5.0 out of 5 stars A spiritual surprise from Salinger
Although the characters are highly unlikely (in their academic attainments and spiritual knowledge) they serve the purpose of true religious exposition in a manner reminiscent of... Read more
Published 13 months ago by Michael Weston
4.0 out of 5 stars Very Good
I had to buy this book for school, didnt like the book much however in terms of the product, lovely condition. Definitely worth buying online.
Published 16 months ago by mztellitlikeitis
5.0 out of 5 stars favourite book
I love this book. It is one of my favourites. Leaves you yearning for Salinger to have written so many more stories.
Published 16 months ago by loopknitting
5.0 out of 5 stars amazing
Amazing, written so well. Its a cliche to say but i really couldnt put it down. Very nearly as good as Catcher In the Rye!
Published 18 months ago by claire mason
4.0 out of 5 stars I love JD
I know some of you are thinking of that handsome young Doctor in Scrubs (and I do love him too if you must know, I've got a lot of love to go around), but in this instance I'm... Read more
Published on 20 May 2012 by variouscushions
4.0 out of 5 stars Franny and Zooey
I preferred the short story 'Franny' to 'Zooey' which I found a bit hard to get into. Enjoyable and well-written but not as good as Catcher in the Rye or For Esme with Love and... Read more
Published on 30 Nov 2011 by ANV
5.0 out of 5 stars there are beautiful things in this world, buddy
I love this book, have indeed loved it for a very long time, ever since I bought it from a flea marked when I was 19. Read more
Published on 22 May 2011 by Amazonfan
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