Customer Reviews

201
4.3 out of 5 stars
Frankenstein
Format: Kindle EditionChange
Price:£0.00
Your rating(Clear)Rate this item


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
on 6 August 2014
As an English Literature student this Kindle adaptation is shocking as it is a shorter version of the original text and leaves out some of the Creatures narrative. The three star rating may show a simple reasoning/sympathy with the Creature as he the doppelganger of Victor on so many levels as Victor is the monster of his creation. However looking over Frankenstein in depth over this year really creates a love for Shelley as her writing overall is sublime even though Frankenstein is the biography of her life both on joys and losses if looking at it from the perspectives of Victor or Elizabeth. If your going to watch a film adaptation watch Kenneth Brannaghs adaptation as it sticks close to the book but it does change some key aspects. Kindle please make sure you have the right text before publishing instead of having an edited version as its rather disappointing when you've studied a text for nine months and download a copy for enjoyment when it's clearly edited. Please sort this issue out
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on 2 December 2014
I admit that this is a well written story and that the tale is quite involving, even though, as others have said, it is nothing like the films!

A great beginning in the wastes of the Artic, where Frankenstein tells the tale of how he created his monster (exactly how we aren't told, but there is no grave robbing and bolts of electricity!) and realises what a terrible mistake he has made.

The problem for me was that there were too many holes in the story. Of course it is a fantasy but it just seemed that the author didn't take enough care over the plot. I found that these inconsistencies bugged me too much and spoiled my enjoyment of the book.

For example, the circumstances of the murders. The monster wanted revenge on Frankenstein so it kills a number of his friends and relatives. How did it know who Frankenstein was and how did it find his relatives? Frankenstein goes walking in the glacier fields hundreds of miles away and months and months after creating the monster, and guess who he bumps into? He travels to London with his pal, at one point travelling pretty fast up the Rhine. (Ms Shelley gives us a nice travelogue). Then after a spell in London the pair travel up to Scotland (another nice travelogue), Frankenstein leaves his pal in Perth and travels up to Orkney. The monster is right behind him! How did it follow him? We are told the monster is grotesque and no human could stand the sight of it, so obviously it couldn't have got around by carriage or crossed the seas by boat! And how did it fund its journey?

The most distracting episode was near the end, Frankenstein goes a bit mad in Orkney and jumps in a little boat. He gets blown about by a storm and after spending a day or so at sea he ends up washed up in Ireland. A bit of a long way in a rowing boat! But suspend your belief - the worst is yet to come - the day before this, his pal was killed and his body found in exactly the same village where Frankenstein washed up! So in less than 48 hours, the monster has managed to get from Orkney to Perth, find and kill Frankenstein's pal, cart his body across Scotland, get across to Ireland and dump the corpse, knowing that Frankenstein would get blown about in a storm and end up washed up in exactly the same place the next day.

I also found it difficult to accept that the monster lived for over a year without being discovered in a lean-to next to a cottage in the woods, observing the occupants, living on roots and berries and learning to speak and read (to a very high standard) just by peering at the people through a little window.

Perhaps I should have viewed this book from a different perspective, and view it as a discourse on the nature of evil, rather than just a horror story. But I want a book to be a good read as well! And in my opinion it seemed clumsily constructed.

This book left me a bit frustrated. A brilliant concept and well written, quite absorbing, but let down big time by some patches of boring narrative and irritating inconsistencies. In my opinion 'Dracula' was a much better novel!
11 commentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Yet another gem that has come into the public domain which means a free download.

One of my all time favourite stories. There are some great descriptive passages here beginning in St Petersburgh and following the journey of one man's expedition through some of the hardest and most beautiful scenery. Mary Shelley takes us on a journey from a Greenland Whaler through to the shores of Lake Como before the darkest aspects of her story begin to unfold and we're finally introduced to Mr Frankenstein and '...the demoniacal corpse..' we all know and love so well.

I think 'the monster' is much better portrayed in the book than he's ever been in movie or TV form. He's such an enigma. His physical appearance, almost 8 feet tall and an assembly of re-animated body parts, is truly revolting but; he possesses perfect dialogue and strong intellect. He fully understands his predicament and knows who made him. His dreadful sense of loneliness coupled with his desire to belong make him vulnerable, almost childlike. Is he a villain or a victim?.

This is such a complex story and regularly rambles away as scene and location are further explored and altered. There's so much complexity. Mary Shelley moves from family domesticity to tragedy, murder and horror in a way that leaves contemporary writers in the shade.

Language, phrasing and social attitudes from the era will provide you with a challenge if you're not used to literature from the period but; give it a go even if you only scan through. It's worth it.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 21 June 2013
See my review of this book, and many more, at TalesfromtheGreatEastRoad.wordpress.com

After a childhood of indulging his scientific curiosities, Victor Frankenstein has realised his purpose: to create life from death. But despite succeeding, once he lays eye upon the creature his has created Victor knows he has made a grave mistake. He has created a monster, one which torments his soul and preys upon his family. No-one is safe, and now Victor must travel and destroy his work before anyone else is hurt.

Frankenstein is a novel that explores the nature of playing God and questions the limits of science. Through its melodramatic prose and horrific descriptions, it is a masterwork of the Gothic and Horror genres. The idea of an arrogant young man who believes he can defeat death only to have it go terribly wrong is one that has been used many times since this novel's publication. Victor tries to play God, only to regret his actions and detest his own creation, which in turn causes the Creature to hate him in turn, blaming Victor for his wretched existence. The novel challenges the idea of power between man and God: Victor is the creator thus the Creature believes him to be the cause of his suffering, and the only one able to relieve it, yet the Creature is far superior in strength and ability to survive in the wild. He haunts Victor's every move, striking down those he loves one by one despite all efforts to stop him; the Creature's free will gives him power over his God. The Creature also blames his murderous intent on Victor, insisting that he was inherently virtuous before the misery of rejection caused him to seek vengeance, whereas Victor believes him to be monstrous through and through. Mary Shelley questions the nature of mankind: are we born to good, or is this just a human ideal? After all, animals have no sense of evil, just survival. Is Frankenstein's creature man or beast? As in real life, there are no solid conclusions drawn.

Within this novel's style it is possible to see the origins of the Gothic genre. Whilst the questions asked are intriguing and it reads well, it is written in an almost painfully melodramatic way. Victor is often found weeping at mere thoughts and worries, whilst his creature laments his fortunes over and over to anyone listening: "When I run over the frightful catalogue of my sins, I cannot believe that I am the same creature whose thoughts were once filled with sublime and transcendent visions of the beauty and the majesty of goodness. But it is even so; the fallen angel becomes a malignant devil. Yet even that enemy of God and man had friends and associates in his desolation; I am alone.1" This reads as awfully heavy-handed, and soon becomes fairly boring.

It is easy to see why Frankenstein is considered a classic: its deep questions into human nature and the tormented journey of both Victor and his creature are fascinating to read. However, it is hindered by the overly dramatic writing style and self-serving soliloquies, which causes the novel to become repetitive.

3 stars.

1 All you need to do is add an "O" to the beginning of this quote and you have yourself a Shakespearian monologue
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on 7 July 2013
The book is a product of its age and the sentiments written are far more thought provoking than the horror films of modern age on Frankenstein's Monster. This is not a horror story but more a heart searching of how a 19th century man reacts using the science of his day and perhaps going too far
11 commentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 20 October 2013
I downloaded this classic because my daughter is studying it for her GCSE. It take's a while to get into the actual story mainly because the narration is via letters from the explorer Robert Walton to his sister back home. However, once Victor Frankenstein is discovered and begins unfolding his tale the text moves a pace. It is does stutter at times and you have to immerse yourself in the style of the early 19th century language. Shelley's characters are not always clearly drawn, we are frequently told that the monster is grotesque but there is little actual description of his physical image apart from the fact that he is over 8 feet tall! Her style of writing sometimes feels clumsy and contrived and it's difficult to sympathise with Victor Frankenstein whose selfish pursuit of creating life causes so much destruction and despair. It does sometimes feels like you are ploughing through pages just to get to the good bits but it's not a long book and well worth reading if you like the genre, want to tick another classic off your list or need to support your teenager!
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on 5 February 2014
I thought I knew the story of Frankenstein, but after reading it I was wrong. For one, 'Frankenstein' is not the monster which is widely assumed, but the creator. The novel raises some serious questions about evil, whether we are created this way or whether society makes us this way, leading to philosophical ponderings surrounding mankind. I thoroughly recommend this, it is not too long or hard to read and is very gripping. If you like gothic fiction you can't skip this.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
To readers who have only seen the Hollywood movies, this book will come as something of a surprise. More a story of feelings and who is really the monster than a horror story, I felt Shelley wanted the reader to have sympathy for Victor which was not due. An interesting read, not hampered too badly by olde English, I recommend this book as a good read.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
This book is incredibly long, mainly because the dialogue is so desperately wordy, but I really struggled to keep myself motivated to read it. (Actually it was only because it was a Book Club book that I persevered to the end.) I will admit I'm not a big lover of classics, so my judgement isn't really very balanced, so please ignore this review if you know you enjoy old tomes. I was frustrated by some of the inconsistencies, and the ridiculous 'coincidences', but for me the intolerable bit that caused me to skim read, was the dialogue of Van Helsing the Dutch Professor. He's the most verbose individual I've ever come across, and every inch of his dialogue was written in idiosyncratic pidgen-English, which after the first few chapters was SO annoying!
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 4 January 2013
Its a classic of course, but actually its badly constructed and long-winded. I persevered to the end, for the sake of knowing what it was all about. Only passing similarity to the "urban myth" of what Frankenstein's Monster was all about, which was kinda interesting. I didn't know that Frankenstein got most of the way to making a Mrs Monster, working in N Scotland, for instance. Nor that the original monster was created in Bavaria (S Germany).

Even if you accept the basic implausibility of the monster creation, the rest of the book is heavily peppered with other gross implausibilities to the point of being silly. If written today, this book would never have made it to being published, and rightly so.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
     
 
Customers who viewed this item also viewed


Frankenstein
Frankenstein by Mary Shelley
£0.99
 
     

Send us feedback

How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you?
Let us know here.