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Frankenstein Created Woman [DVD] [1967]

26 customer reviews

Price: £8.99 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £20. Details
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£8.99 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £20. Details Usually dispatched within 9 to 11 days. Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

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Frankenstein Created Woman [DVD] [1967] + The Revenge of Frankenstein [DVD] [1958]
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Product details

  • Actors: Peter Cushing, Thorley Walters, Susan Denberg, Robert Morris, Duncan Lamont
  • Directors: Terence Fisher
  • Producers: Anthony Nelson-Keys
  • Format: PAL, Colour, Widescreen, Anamorphic
  • Language: English
  • Region: Region 2 (This DVD may not be viewable outside Europe. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 16:9 - 1.78:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Classification: 12
  • Studio: Studiocanal
  • DVD Release Date: 1 Jan. 2007
  • Run Time: 87 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (26 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B000KRMZO2
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 37,255 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Reviews

In this sequel to 'Evil of Frankenstein' (1964), the Baron (Peter Cushing) has taken up residence with well-meaning inebriate Doctor Hertz (Thorley Walters). When Hertz successfully revives Frankenstein after freezing his body, the latter deduces that the human spirit does not leave the body after death, and can therefore be transmuted into another form. He gets the chance to prove his theory when his young assistant, Hans, is hanged for a murder he did not commit, and Hans' disfigured lover, Christina, commits suicide in despair. After performing cosmetic surgery on Christina, the two scientists successfully transfer Hans' spirit into her body. However, Hans now sets out to take revenge on those responsible for his death.

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By S J Buck TOP 500 REVIEWER on 26 Dec. 2007
Format: DVD
Peter Cushing effortlessly dominates this very good Hammer film, which would prove to be the best of their late Frankenstein movies. What makes this film a cut above the average Hammer film is the fine script by Anthony Hinds, which gives the film the feel of a classic Victorian horror story. You could believe this was based on a book by Mary Shelley or Bram Stoker.

Cushing portrays Baron Frankenstein as a driven man, intent at all costs to prove that the soul lives on after death, and that the soul can be returned to the body if the body is brought back to life... You can see where this is going. Cushing plays the role with his usual authority and even has the opportunity to show the Barons superiority in a court room, which is a lovely scene. Even if you don't spot him in the credits you can't miss Derek Fowlds (Bernard in Yes Minister) as one of the three upper-class louts.

As a general rule of thumb Hammer films directed by Terence Fisher tend to be the better ones. Guess who this is directed by - yes Terence Fisher. Keeping my feet firmly on the ground I realise this film isn't up there with 'Citizen Kane' or 'The Godfather'. However, Martin Scorcese did pick this film to be shown in a season of his favourites at the NFT in London 1987 and is quoted as saying "If I single this one out it's because here they actually isolate the soul. The implied metaphysics are close to something sublime".

So this isn't Fellini, or even Scorcese, but its much better than the title might suggest and well worth adding to your collection.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 15 May 2000
Format: VHS Tape
This is the only one of the Hammer Frankenstein films I've seen so far, and from what I've read about the others in the series I have a lot to look forward to.
In this film Dr Frankenstein merges the soul of a beheaded man with the body of his drowned girlfriend, who then goes on a killing streak of the 3 guys who got him hanged for a crime he didn't commit in the first place (the girlfriends father).
I just love these old horror movies, but they are quite expensive where I live, so I buy them from Amazon.uk instead.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Jeremy W. Newbould on 12 May 2010
Format: DVD
Baron Frankenstein (Peter Cushing) uses his surgical skills to transform a disfigured woman into a beautiful Playboy Playmate (Susan Denberg). The problem is that he has also transferred the soul of her dead lover, Hans (Robert Morris), into her body and Hans was framed for murder and then executed so revenge is on the cards.

This is an entertaining entry in Hammer's "Frankenstein" series of films and it saw Terence Fisher return to the series as director. The story may be a bit daft in places and lacking in logic (since when has that mattered anyway in 1960s' horror movies?) but it moves along quite well and contains some interesting and original ideas.

Peter Cushing is excellent, yet again, as The Baron and Thorley Walters (who kind of cornered the market in playing doddery old sods) is good as The Baron's dotty assistant, Doctor Hertz. Look out for Derek Fowlds (from "Yes, Minister" and "Heartbeat") as an upper-class twit who gets what's coming to him.

At the end of the day, the combination of Hammer/Fisher/Cushing makes this movie a must-see for anyone who loves classic British horror.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Trevor Willsmer HALL OF FAMETOP 100 REVIEWER on 22 Dec. 2007
Format: DVD
Frankenstein Created Woman is much more fun than you'd expect. One of the better of Hammer's Frankenstein sequels, it's an efficient programmer that sees Cushing's Baron trapping the soul of his guillotined assistant and putting it in the body of his disfigured girlfriend, only for the wronged boy to use her to kill those who really done the crime he was executed for. There's more build-up than payoff, but its very sedateness (indeed, almost cosiness) is part of the pleasure, and it's hard not to warm to the Baron's arrogance and aloofness, whether it be reading in the witness box or casually answering a policeman's "Do you take us for fools?" with a simple "Yes." Still, it is remarkable just how well preserved that severed head is after six months...

As with so many Hammer titles, this received little love on home video in its home territory. While Anchor Bay's US DVD had trailers, TV spots and an episode of the World of Hammer compilation series, the UK DVDs come with no extras at all, while the UK Blu-ray release seems to be indefiniately cancelled. Millenium's Region A-locked US Bluray release offers a much better deal for those with multi-region Blu-ray players - audio commentary by Derek Fowlds, Robert Morris and Jonathan Rigby, two episodes of World of hammer (one on Peter Cushing the other on Frankenstein), the same 44-minute Hammer Glamour documentary found on the UK blu-ray of The Witches, a stills gallery, trailer and (at least in the first print run) five art cards from the film.
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13 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Matthew Mercy on 16 July 2007
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
A decade on from their groundbreaking The Curse of Frankenstein (1957) and its excellent sequel The Revenge of Frankenstein (1958), Terence Fisher and Peter Cushing renewed their collaboration on Hammer's greatest horror franchise with the macabre Frankenstein Created Woman, a reasonable return to form for the series after the decidedly weaker Cushing / Freddie Francis effort The Evil of Frankenstein (1964). Now reduced to penury after his repeated hounding and exile in previous films, Baron Victor Frankenstein lives quietly in a little European village, arousing the suspicion of the locals, but curiously, not their persecution. When his young assistant is executed for a crime he didn't commit, the boy's crippled girlfriend drowns herself with grief, at which point Victor decides to transplant not the brain, but the soul of his assistant into the girl's reconstructed body...
Frankenstein Created Woman is now regarded by many critics as one of the best Hammer films, though in all honesty it has always left me rather cold. Presumably supposed to follow on from the previous Francis-directed entry in terms of continuity, it has Cushing's Baron on more confident and sardonic form than it that film, a complex, cold-hearted, yet curiously sympathetic outcast; however, he is still considerably more flaky and detached than he was in Fisher's first two movies (and a far cry from the bad-to-the-bone bastard he'd become in 1969's Frankenstein Must Be Destroyed). Though fresh ideas (soul rather than brain transplants, and obviously the female 'creation') help to shake up the by-now-familiar plot, the film is curiously devoid of action, save the three climactic murders, and it leaves the viewer feeling as though the potential in its premise has largely gone to waste.
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