Frank 2014

LOVEFiLM By Post

Britain’s largest choice of DVDs and Blu-rays to rent by post £7.99 per month.

Start your 30 day free trial

Existing LOVEFiLM member? Switch account

Prime and Prime Instant Video members can receive unlimited discs, two at a time, for £6.99 per month after trial.

Watch Frank instantly from £3.49 with Amazon Instant Video

(11)
LOVEFiLM By Post

Acclaimed Irish director Lenny Abrahamson follows up his award-winning films Adam & Paul, Garage and What Richard Did with an offbeat comedy about a young wannabe musician, Jon (Domhnall Gleeson), who finds himself out of his depth when he joins an avant-garde pop band led by the mysterious and enigmatic Frank (Michael Fassbender), a musical genius who hides himself inside a large fake head, and his terrifying bandmate Clara (Maggie Gyllenhaal). Written by Jon Ronson (The Men Who Stare At Goats) and Peter Straughan (Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy, The Men Who Stare At Goats), FRANK is based on the memoir by Jon Ronson. It is a fictional story loosely inspired by Frank Sidebottom, the persona of cult musician and comedy legend Chris Sievey.

Starring:
Michael Fassbender, Maggie Gyllenhaal
Rental Formats:
DVD, Blu-ray

Frank

Product Details

Discs
  • Feature ages_15_and_over
Runtime 1 hour 35 minutes
Starring Michael Fassbender, Maggie Gyllenhaal, Domhnall Gleeson
Director Leonard Abrahamson
Genres Comedy, Drama
Studio Curzon Film World
Rental release 15 September 2014
Main languages English
Discs
  • Feature ages_15_and_over
Runtime 1 hour 35 minutes
Starring Michael Fassbender, Maggie Gyllenhaal, Domhnall Gleeson
Director Leonard Abrahamson
Genres Comedy, Drama
Studio Curzon Film World
Rental release 15 September 2014
Main languages English

Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Paul Allaer TOP 500 REVIEWER on 12 Sep 2014
Format: Blu-ray
"Frank" (2014 release from the UK/Ireland; 95 min.) brings the story of Jon, a British wanna-be musician. As the movie opens, we see Jon trying to compose a song, to no avail. By complete coincidence, Jon makes the acquaintance of a band with the unpronounceable name "Soronprfbs" who are looking for a replacement keyboard player. Jon can't believe his good luck when he is invited to join the band, at first just for one gig, but later on for "something big in Ireland". Meanwhile, the band's lead singer and song writer is a guy named Frank, who is never seen without his large papier-mâché head. What caused Frank to start wearing that head? Is he perhaps disfigured? And, as Jon wants to know, "how does he clean his teeth?", ha! To tell you more would spoil your viewing experience, you'll just have to see for yourself how it all plays out.

Couple of comments: first, this is one of the most original and weirdest (in the best possible way) films I have seen in a long, long time. Director Lenny Abrahamson, who previously brought us the equally excellent "What Richard Did", and working from a script by Jon Ronson and Peter Straughan, brings this one-of-a-kind tale to the screen with great imagination and intuition. Even though this movie is billed as "drama/comedy", it is really comedy in the first half, and a dark character study in the latter parts. Third, if you don't care much for music, in particular indie music, chances are you're not going to care much for this film, as music plays front and center throughout. The score is courtesy of Irish composer Stephen Remmicks, and he brings us an eclectic smorgasbord of sounds and songs. Incidentally, the band was recorded live for the film.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By R. J. Lister on 22 May 2014
Format: Blu-ray
Jon Ronson also wrote the equally irreverent The Men Who Stare At Goats, adapted for the screen by Peter Straughan. Here, Ronson and Straughan join forces to create something with more emotional meat on its bones, albeit one no less hermetically sealed inside its own barmy parallel world. The pay-off is worth it, though. Just as one is starting to tire of the whimsical `randomness' and the characters' clever-clever put-downs the film finds its heart; something serious and worth saying about the madness at the heart of creativity.

The title character is played by Michael Fassbender, who you've probably seen weighed down by that giant Frank Sidebottom head. But the main protagonist is Jon. Domhnall Gleeson is a dab hand at these nice guy softies, and his presence is well used here. We're wittily introduced to Jon as he tries to make songs in his head based on mundane everyday sights. Blue jackets and suburban housing. A chance meeting with Don (brilliant character actor Scoot McNairy), manager of the unpronounceable "Soronprfbs", gets Jon a gig with the band. Soon the collective depart to rural Ireland, where they spend a year bickering, shagging, dying, and occasionally recording music.

The outsider coming in and causing shockwaves isn't an original idea, but Ronson puts an original spin on it. Normally, the straight guy would have his mind expanded by the free-spiritedness of the band, whereas here the band is in need of a normalising influence. What Jon offers is an element of order to the chaos. Something mainstream. Something "likeable". The film has a bit in common with Inside Llewyn Davis in its theme of balancing artistic credibility with the basic survival of the musical act, although with more silliness and a touch less soul than the Coen Brothers' masterpiece.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Jennifer Whybird on 18 Sep 2014
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
I love this movie from start to finish as we all learn a lot about life through our friends and this group is no exception. The saying it's all about the journey rather than the destination that really shines through here! Through the loss, the laughs & of course the music Frank the central character who values home & friends above all else finally unmasks to accept that real love into his life! My favourite part! Ps. If you don't leave quoting, 'Stop I've got a certificate for that' then you just don't get it lol 😉. My tip have fun with it!
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By N. Whittaker on 19 Sep 2014
Format: Blu-ray
I found it quite a gentle and mildly amusing film....that had a few touching moments. Loved the film overall.
BTW Clearly nothing to do with Frank Sidebottom per se!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 9 people found the following review helpful By DeclanCochran on 11 May 2014
Format: Blu-ray
(this review is a shortened version of the one I have written on my blog, larsandthereelgirl.blogspot.co.uk)

Frank (Michael Fassbender in a Frank Sidebottom head-mask) is one of those magnetic types who people tend to gravitate towards whilst himself lacking his own centre. Just look at how willingly Jon (Domhnall Gleeson) drops everything, including his job, nest egg and secure suburban life, to join Frank and his band as a keyboardist in recording an album.

In fact, despite what the title tell us, this film is really more about Jon that it is about Frank. The film begins and ends with him, and he is undoubtedly the core of this film. We first see him as he tries to piece together random lyrics by observing the world around him, and these scenes set up the film nicely; by turns absolutely hilarious and ruthlessly honest.

A series of unfortunate events gets Jon playing as keyboardist in the band “Soronprfbs” (nobody else in the film knows how to pronounce it either), of which Frank is the lead singer.

But this is no ordinary band, and their first gig consists of half of one song before one of the instruments blows up and the theremin player Clara (Maggie Gyllenhaal) storms off. We are also introduced to Don (Scoot McNairy), the band's manager, who is the biggest surprise in this film, and gives arguably the best performance in it.

It's a film built on little details, such as the film’s frequently hilarious use of Jon’s Twitter and Youtube feed. As we get to know Jon, we also realise that he is fundamentally a good person, but also a ruthless opportunist. We do delve into the persona of Frank, mask and all, and it comes as no surprise late into the film that he has mental health issues.
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Product Images from Customers