Shop now Shop now Shop now  Up to 50% Off Fashion  Shop all Amazon Fashion Cloud Drive Photos Shop now Learn More Shop now Shop now Shop Fire Shop Kindle Shop now Shop now

Your rating(Clear)Rate this item


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

"Family Values" is the shortest Sin City book (barring "Booze, Broads, and Bullets" which is a collection of short stories) featuring Dwight (from "A Dame to Kill For")and Miho (from "The Big Fat Kill") as they set their sights for revenge against one of Basin City's mafia families. The story is standard fare if you're familiar with Sin City; if not, the story is told in black and white with flashes of primary colour (often red) and reads like the hard boiled noir thrillers of the 30s and 40s by Raymond Chandler and Dashiell Hammett put out by publishers like Black Cat.

Which isn't to say it's no good - it's very entertaining, a solid book by the great Frank Miller and a fine instalment in his masterful series. Though, besides a twist at the end it's fairly straightforward and not as inventive as other Sin City books of which I recommend the first four books that precede this fifth volume as wonderful reads and works of art. But what you do get is the kind of stuff readers and fans of Sin City have come to know and love about the series: lots of moody scenes at night in alleys in the pouring rain, sleazy bars filled with worn out whores and jaded bartenders, honourable street thugs, bullets and guns aplenty, and lots of killing, some of them quite funny, courtesy of bloody-minded Miho.

It's a fast read but still great fun and holds up real well. I read the Sin City series years ago and every time I pick up a volume to remind myself of and re-read the greatness, I always come away impressed with what Frank Miller achieved with his signature work. "Family Values" is not the best in the series, in fact the book could be ranked in the order it appeared - fifth - but considering the incredible quality of the first four, it's no less brilliant for it. Well worth a look and a cracking read.
0Comment|One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
"Family Values" is the shortest Sin City book (barring "Booze, Broads, and Bullets" which is a collection of short stories) featuring Dwight (from "A Dame to Kill For")and Miho (from "The Big Fat Kill") as they set their sights for revenge against one of Basin City's mafia families. The story is standard fare if you're familiar with Sin City; if not, the story is told in black and white with flashes of primary colour (often red) and reads like the hard boiled noir thrillers of the 30s and 40s by Raymond Chandler and Dashiell Hammett put out by publishers like Black Cat.

Which isn't to say it's no good - it's very entertaining, a solid book by the great Frank Miller and a fine instalment in his masterful series. Though, besides a twist at the end it's fairly straightforward and not as inventive as other Sin City books of which I recommend the first four books that precede this fifth volume as wonderful reads and works of art. But what you do get is the kind of stuff readers and fans of Sin City have come to know and love about the series: lots of moody scenes at night in alleys in the pouring rain, sleazy bars filled with worn out whores and jaded bartenders, honourable street thugs, bullets and guns aplenty, and lots of killing, some of them quite funny, courtesy of bloody-minded Miho.

It's a fast read but still great fun and holds up real well. I read the Sin City series years ago and every time I pick up a volume to remind myself of and re-read the greatness, I always come away impressed with what Frank Miller achieved with his signature work. "Family Values" is not the best in the series, in fact the book could be ranked in the order it appeared - fifth - but considering the incredible quality of the first four, it's no less brilliant for it. Well worth a look and a cracking read.
0Comment|One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 20 July 2005
Another awesome sin city installment. Admittidly not with the same raw, cut graphics of the first few but still beautiful & signature Miller. As this was the shortest of the books i've read from the series it does leave you wanting but for the price it is a cracking read - dark, blunt and full of that amazing circling dialogue that Miller fans have seen in not only Sin City but his Batman aswell. Incidentally, had some serious deja vous moments with some of the compositions of Miho and Miller's Caroline Kelly (Robin From Dark Knight Returns & Strikes Again) and there is a hint of Vinnie in Lex Luthor aswell. Basically if you were a fan of the above titles or the series in general this won't let you down but i would be tempted to invest in another aswell to keep you busy as it is short and pacey. For the those daring to enter Sin City for the first time this is a great piece but i'd hit the Yellow Bastard or A Dame to Kill For first- this one is a good accompeniament to save for a cookie break or a rainy day.
Keep it casual
r
0Comment|8 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 5 January 2001
Another yarn of violent payback on the mean streets of Sin City. A man with a debt to pay is looking for answers regarding the murder of a city official called Bruno. Bruno has a shadowy past, and his killers haven't managed to cover their tracks.....
Business as usual in Sin City - the breathtaking use of black and white imagery successfully conveys the mean streets and low lifes, whilst the violence is suitably grotesque and over the top. The bitter black comedic plot should grab anyone who is a fan of of Chandler, Leonard or Ellroy.
Not top notch when compared to The Big Fat Kill or the original Sin City but still worth taking a look at for lovers of crime or if you wonder what Miller got up to after Batman: The Dark Knight Returns.
0Comment|8 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 12 May 2015
Have been working through these recently for the first time and finding them reasonably enjoyable. I liked the movie mainly for the striking visual style, and that's largely the strength of the books too. Saying that, while many pages look fantastic (particularly the large full page images), the art can quite frequently be a bit impenetrable, the composition can be messy enough that it's tough to see what some panels are even supposed to depict.

The stories and narration are a little one note too, so overall the books aren't exactly classics, but a decent enough bit of throwaway pulp entertainment. It's unashamedly style over substance, thankfully the style is strong enough to carry it for the most part.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
When I started reading "Family Values," Book 5 of Frank Miller's "Sin City" series, I found myself wondering why Dwight keeps getting to be the narrator-protagonist of the comic noir stories. Then I remembered that Marv and Hartigan are both dead, so it means it is either Dwight or somebody new and Miller will have to get to the latter sooner or later. But for the third time in the first five books, once again Dwight is the man.
Dwight shows up at Poppa's Olympian Palace, an old fashioned diner (you know the type; it looks like you could put it on wheels and hitch it to a train as a cheap dinner car) driving a VW Beetle (hey, it is a German car, so what is your complaint? Besides, you can always trade up). The place is riddled with bullets and whatever happened there Dwight is interested, and since deadly little Miho is backing him up we have to think it has something to do with the girls of Old Town. The problem is that nobody is talking about why what happened at Poppa's happened and it takes a while and a couple of versions of the tale to figure out the meaning of the key detail Miller keeps working into the art. You are not going to be able to figure out what is going on until it is all laid out for you, but that is not necessarily a bad thing (as opposed to telegraphing the ending). I also like a red herring, especially when it walks on four legs.
It seems like every killing in Sin City is revenge for a previous killing, which just means there is another killing in Sin City that needs to be revenged and the cycle goes on and on and on. But there is a moral to this particular story and as Dwight notes it is a great big wide world out there and there's all kinds of families in it. Apparently they all play by the same rules, it is just that some are a lot better at it, especially when it comes to covering their tracks. The best part of this story is the way Dwight has to unravel the truth, moving from one source to the next to find out another layer of the truth so that he and Miho know exactly who has to pay for what happened (and we finally get to find out what really happened).
"Family Values" is a relative short "Sin City" tale, coming it at 126 black & white pages and I think picking pink as the color on the cover to go along with the drawing of Miho in the snow might be a made choice (besides red and yellow, do any colors really make sense in Miller's "Sin City"). Miller does some nice things with the snow in Book 5 that are interesting, but reducing Miho to a ghostly figure of pure white takes a little getting used to (especially if you want to start unpacking the symbolic value of doing so in contrast to the shadows and dirt of Sin City in general). It is a rather simple and ordinary tale by "Sin City" standards, but that still makes it above average if you are looking at the overall genre of graphic novels.
0Comment|3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 12 July 2013
I've ordered about 3/4 books from this company and they're the only one out of all the ones i've ordered where the books arrive all bent up and awkward to hold with the corners all bashed up considering they're supposed to be new; it's a bit unnecessary
I really just don't know how they have such a high review when i've so quickly come to realise they're unreliable.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 12 January 2014
This is absolutely one of the best story arcs of Sin City. Hartigan fits perfectly into this universe of Miller's noir. The paperback format, however, I find to be on the small side for this beautiful piece of art. Unfortunately, the price tag on a bigger collected version of this story is out of my price range.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 9 March 2011
I was really expecting to see the book depicted on the picture.Instead i saw a different edition of the book where the cover is white and a woman is in the middle.Not recommended for those collecting the comic books with the original covers,the ones that create a picture of a girl at the side
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 6 February 2007
What can I say - brilliant.

I chose to review this one and not the others as

a) people who read the series will suspect review the first one only, and

b) this is is my favourite of them all (personally)

Buy all of these books, 1-7, they are all truly great stories. Some people have knocked the graphical style of these books - to me, they are one of the high points - they has a superb style all of their own. Millers dialogue, jokes, slang and story are all superb - great film noir, and add in his sound effects (SPAK! HEFF!) and he really has made this series unique Miller.

Finally, I'm not a fan of comparisons with films - usually graphic novels are changed dramatically (often for the worse) in the movies. Sin City is different. I thought it was a cracking film and is incredibly faithful to the books (although in differing order). Therefore, for once I can say, if you liked the film you'll love the book, as opposed to if you hated the film dont be put off by the book.

Cinematic, thrill a minute series.
0Comment|5 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse