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Framley Parsonage Kindle Edition

4.6 out of 5 stars 34 customer reviews

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Length: 384 pages Word Wise: Enabled
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Product Description

Review

Convincingly argues that its narrative of "precarious livings and tenancy" displaces to Barsetshire topical concerns about land ownership and occupation in Ireland. (Matthew Ingleby, The Times Literary Supplement)

Synopsis

Mark Robarts, an ambitious young clergyman, is helped to a comfortable living at Framley by Lady Lufton. When Robarts becomes liable for the debts of an unreliable friend, he turns for help once again to the reluctant Lady Lufton. These audio cassettes contain the complete and unabridged story.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 1529 KB
  • Print Length: 384 pages
  • Page Numbers Source ISBN: 1847187013
  • Publisher: Heraklion Press (23 April 2014)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00JWUTL40
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Not Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars 34 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #274,966 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
In this fourth novel of the Barsetshire Chronicles Trollope entertwines two main storylines. The first centers on Mark Robarts who has recently, and at an uncommonly young age, become vicar at Framley. He has a doting wife and children, a loving patroness in Lady Framley, and a good friend in her son Lord Lufton. Things could not be going better for Mark Robarts it seems, but then he gets carried away by his success. He starts to mix in high circles and with politicians, and before he fully well realizes what's happening finds himself in debt to the scheming politician Sowerby, with financial and social ruin threatening. The second storyline is about Lucy Robarts, Marks' younger sister living with him at Framley parsonage. She's in trouble too: she has fallen in love with Lord Lufton and he with her, but Lady Lufton firmly opposes the match, and Lucy - out of a sense of pride - rejects Lord Lufton and says she will not take his hand unless his mother asks her to accept it.

This may not seem much to write more than 500 pages about, but Trollope does so brilliantly and keeps you engaged throughout. As always he concentrates on the inner life of his characters, and their thoughts and feelings are described in great detail. As often with Trollope too, you have the feeling from the very start that in the end all will turn out well for Lucy and Mark, but this too (strangely so perhaps) doesn't in the least diminish one's appetite for reading on. 'Framley Parsonage' is mainly a reflection on the qualities of a gentleman, and the changing perception of such in Victorian times where birth and rank still counted for a lot, coupled with a growing belief that it is first and foremost moral standing and behaviour that really makes a gentleman.
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By Mary Whipple HALL OF FAMETOP 100 REVIEWER on 5 Mar. 2008
Format: Paperback
The fourth of the Chronicles of Barsetshire, Framley Parsonage (1861) is a gentle novel filled with memorable characters, including many characters who from The Warden, Barchester Towers, and Dr. Thorne. Mark Robarts, a young vicar with a devoted wife, has a comfortable situation at Framley Parsonage on the estate of the indomitable Lady Lufton. Her son, now Lord Lufton, had been a friend of Mark Robarts at school, and it was their friendship which resulted in Mark's position. Mark, though conscientious in his duties and grateful for his situation, is ambitious, however, anxious to expand his horizons beyond Framley.

Lady Lufton, who rules with an iron hand, is appalled when Mark decides to spend a weekend with a "fast" crowd, one which he believes can advance his career. Young and naïve, he becomes the dupe of an aristocratic "con-man," an MP named Nathaniel Sowerby, who persuades him to help him out of a financial jam by signing a note for five hundred pounds (more than half Robarts's yearly salary), allowing Sowerby to draw funds on Robarts's name. Though Sowerby swears he will resolve the problem within weeks, he needs an additional four hundred pounds when the note comes due.

In the meantime, Robarts's sister Lucy arrives at Framley Parsonage upon the death of their father. Lucy, a sweet ingénue in mourning, soon comes to the attention of Lord Lufton, who is fascinated by her naivete, a marked contrast with the women he has known to date. Though Lady Lufton has much more "significant" matrimonial prospects in mind for her son, the courtship begins, and though Lucy declines Lord Lufton's initial proposal, she remains in love with him.
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Format: Paperback
Not necessarily the best Trollope book (a number are more accomplished technically) but the one which to me is the most typically Trollopian and comforting. Basically two stories run together - the story of a clergyman who gets his fingers burnt when hob-nobbing with politicians, and a romance involving his sister-in-law, this mixes familiar characters from Barsetshire with new ones to form a satisfying whole that naturally turns out right at the end - for in Trollope the virtuous are generally rewarded.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I have just downloaded this to my kindle for free! I read the whole of the Barchester series ( 6 in all I think) about 10 years ago, loved them, and am ready to read them again. Lovely gossipy stories which were written about 150 years ago but remove the setting and they're just as relevant today. It makes me realise that as regards greed, pride and power seeking - the human race hasn't moved on an awful lot.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I found this story, of the tribulations of a country vicar who becomes involved with the 'wrong set' and his sister's romance with a man seen as above her station, somewhat uneven in quality. Many parts of the novel completely engaged me, when Trollope uses his discerning eye to present keenly observed characters along with wonderful dialogue which helps create insight into their thoughts and feelings. However, these passages are interspersed with long pages of exposition in the author's own voice, often reiterating what we have already observed at first hand.
This is worth reading for the good parts - but perhaps you may wish to skim parts too.
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