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Fragile Army


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Amazon's The Polyphonic Spree Store

Music

Image of album by The Polyphonic Spree

Photos

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Biography

The Polyphonic Spree began July 15, 2000. Since then they have traversed the globe several times over (including appearances at the Nobel Peace Prize Concert, Oscar de la Renta Fashion Week Runway Show, MTV Video Music Awards, Glastonbury, Summersonic, and various late night TV shows) while receiving accolades, adoration, and even a few imitators. What many outside of Dallas are unaware of is ... Read more in Amazon's The Polyphonic Spree Store

Visit Amazon's The Polyphonic Spree Store
for 24 albums, photos, discussions, and more.

Product details

  • Audio CD (19 Jun 2007)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Tvt
  • ASIN: B000QEIOXK
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Vinyl  |  MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 567,507 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. Together We're Heavy
2. Running Away
3. Get Up And Go
4. The Fragile Army
5. Younger Yesterday
6. We Crawl
7. Mental Cabaret
8. Guaranteed Nightlite
9. Light To Follow
10. Watch Us Explode (Justify)
11. Overblow Your Nest
12. The Championship

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Mr. A. Johnson on 5 July 2007
Format: Audio CD
Following the exceptional but under-appreciated "Together We're Heavy" The Spree return in darker mode (both visually and musically. All the ingredients of their previous work are still there (huge sound, symphonic embellishments and abstract lyrical meanderings brought home by Tim and the choir) but the mix is different. A heavier, rockier sound is present. The drums are to the fore and the symphonic elements are subdued in the mix. The war in Iraq casts a shadow over the work and Tim gives one of the all-time great vocal deliveries in "Overblow your nest", the frustration of mortality sears through his voice, leaving the hairs standing up on the back of your neck. Hope still shines through though, as you would, well, hope from a Polyphonic album. It's kind of more of the same but with a different palette. Watching the video of the process of making the record was fascinating and showed the cracks in the fragile armour. Another grand, bold record but a little harder to swallow than the the sunshine and light of yore. It grows with every listen though.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By M. Doyle on 29 July 2007
Format: Audio CD
I pre-ordered this album from the states after the fantastic service I received with the "Together We're Heavy" ensure your reservation pre-order, and the offer of a double vinyl, CD/DVD and other "bits" for £30 was too much to refuse. As soon as I got home from uni and saw the box marked "US Customs approved" sitting waiting for me I tore into it. I watched the DVD before listening to the album all the way through. I was already worried by the band's new military style uniform, and the fact that on the DVD Tim says this album is heavier and more how he saw the band going, but on listening to the album I relaxed. Although not as good (in my opinion) as its predecessor "Together We're Heavy" this album did not leave my computer or MP3 player for a week after I got it. It's another album which plays best with each track back to back, and the unique touch of having 23 members singing or playing their various instruments consecutively stamps it with The Polyphonic Spree marque. The new pianist (Mike Garson, long time David Bowie pianist) lends an expert touch, and can be seen on the DVD to save one track that Tim DeLaughter was losing faith in during a jamming session. In short buy this album, but if you want to save your money wait until August when it will be released in the UK
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By J. W. Bassett on 6 July 2007
Format: Audio CD
The Polyphonic Spree's 2002 debut coincided with a period of new respect for over-sized band line-ups, from Broken Social Scene through Arcade Fire and Architecture in Helsinki. Since then, the Spree have made two wonderfully euphoric albums and have become an amazing live experience. What they have lacked, though, is any sort of substance.

Until now.

To revitalise their pursuit of joy-mongering, Tim DeLaughter and wife/co-leader Julie Doyle have pared their joyous horde down from 28 members to 24, switched the band uniform from robes to black combat garb, and made a return to the more compact pop songs of the debut album. The songs on The Fragile Army are rock songs embellished with horns and choir. On the previous albums the horns and choir were the songs.

The title track is an anti-Bush Bohemian Rhapsody, while Section 29 [Light To Follow], which establishes the record's over-arching subject - "love in a mixed-up time" - explores new sounds for the group, from electronic beats to an Air-like bass groove, achieving a spacey ambiance.

Section 31 [Overblow Your Nest] is one of DeLaughter's more emotionally sophisticated songs and also an existential assertion of self, "I want this world to know that I'm alive," he cries on the surging chorus. It's an individualistic mantra that's at odds with Spree's egoless concept - many voices joining as one to accomplish any goal, overturn any war monger. More familiar are his Wayne Coyne-esque claims of "together we're all right" on Section 25 [Younger Yesterday] and "when we're both together, I know that we'll be just fine" on Section 26 [We Crawl].
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By N. Johnson on 23 July 2007
Format: Audio CD
I wasn't sure at first what to make of this third album. There were a few tracks I loved immediately - just what you'd expect - but the remainder of the album failed to impress. However, after a few listens I began to appreciate the whole album. It's a little more dark than the previous two which probably caught me off guard and may catch you too, but don't worry, listen again tomorrow and you'll love it. The Spree are definitely on form!
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Format: Audio CD
The Polyphonic Spree's 2002 debut coincided with a period of new respect for over-sized band line-ups, from Broken Social Scene through Arcade Fire and Architecture in Helsinki. Since then, the Spree have made two wonderfully euphoric albums and have become an amazing live experience. What they have lacked, though, is any sort of substance.

Until now.

To revitalise their pursuit of joy-mongering, Tim DeLaughter and wife/co-leader Julie Doyle have pared their joyous horde down from 28 members to 24, switched the band uniform from robes to black combat garb, and made a return to the more compact pop songs of the debut album. The songs on The Fragile Army are rock songs embellished with horns and choir. On the previous albums the horns and choir were the songs.

The title track is an anti-Bush Bohemian Rhapsody, while Section 29 [Light To Follow], which establishes the record's over-arching subject - "love in a mixed-up time" - explores new sounds for the group, from electronic beats to an Air-like bass groove, achieving a spacey ambiance.

Section 31 [Overblow Your Nest] is one of DeLaughter's more emotionally sophisticated songs and also an existential assertion of self, "I want this world to know that I'm alive," he cries on the surging chorus. It's an individualistic mantra that's at odds with Spree's egoless concept - many voices joining as one to accomplish any goal, overturn any war monger. More familiar are his Wayne Coyne-esque claims of "together we're all right" on Section 25 [Younger Yesterday] and "when we're both together, I know that we'll be just fine" on Section 26 [We Crawl].
Read more ›
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