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Four Weeks in Montevideo: The Story of World Cup 1930 Paperback – 1 Oct 2009


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Product details

  • Paperback: 160 pages
  • Publisher: Seventeen Media; 1st edition (1 Oct. 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0956377408
  • ISBN-13: 978-0956377401
  • Product Dimensions: 17.8 x 11 x 1.6 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,215,014 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Product Description

About the Author

Hyder Jawad was born in 1968, grew up in Liverpool, England, and was educated at Birkbeck College, London. He has a first-class degree in humanities and a master's degree in European history. He has been a sportswriter and journalist for the past 20 years. He worked with John Aldridge on the former Liverpool and Ireland striker's autobiography (John Aldridge: My Story, published by Hodder & Stoughton, 1999).

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3.8 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Clarissa Dalloway on 28 Oct. 2009
Format: Paperback
This as one of the most original books I have read on World Cup history. The daily 1930 World Cup diary of "Antonio", whom the author met in Uruguay in 1999, provides a unique context. The author's research also gives an added sense of authenticity.

The stories and anecdotes make inspiring reading. For those who only know the World Cup as an overblown, overhyped event, there is a need to know what it was like in 1930 when players wore hats on the pitch and when referees officiated in three-piece suits.

The appendix to the main book gives a biography of every player, referee, manager, stadium and official. Even the shocking story of the ship on which the players travelled from Europe to South America is told in detail.

If there is a criticism, it is that a few typo errors have evaded the proof-reader, but this does not detract from what is an interesting, original and intriguing book about a time when the World Cup was a small event played in front of small attendances. Recommended.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Ac Hyne on 7 Aug. 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I read this book with an open mind.

However, I must admit to being slightly confused as to how it is that a journalist is walking one day in Montevideo in 1999 (the year I was there too) and comes across a man with a diary from the first World Cup. Why would that person give his diary to a journalist? Why not to AUF? Or, for that matter, FIFA? Where is this diary? And how come it corresponds so well with 'official' versions of the event?

I read through the book and noticed the biography section. Surprise, surprise! Entries that I have written in wikipedia have been included in the biography section, word for word.

I doubt the veracity of this book.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Gareth on 10 Aug. 2010
Format: Paperback
AN INTERVIEW WITH THE AUTHOR: HYDER JAWAD

What were the problems in reconstructing Antonio's diary?

First, I wasn't sure whether the diary was a contemporary document (written by Antonio at the time) or written post facto. Antonio said the diary was written during the tournament but it was difficult to gauge whether or not he was telling the truth. The diary and style of writing looked old but it was hard to tell if it was from the Thirties, Forties, or Fifties. The diary was in English, which made me wonder if it was written much later than 1930. He was 18 in 1930, so surely it was more natural for him to write the diary in Spanish (his first language) or maybe Italian, which is the second language for many Uruguayans. But Antonio was a bit of an Anglophile, and spoke near-perfect English when I met him.

Second, when I was writing the book, I had to transcribe my own shorthand notes that were ten years old. I was, and still am, a creature of the tape recorder, so I was concerned at the reliability of my own shorthand notes.

Third, some of my notes also included vignettes and information that Antonio relayed to me in conversation. Ten years on, when I wrote the book, it was impossible for me to differentiate between what was in the diary and what Antonio told me in conversation. I regret that and regard it is a significant flaw in the book.

The words attributed to Antonio are important in providing an essence of what life at World Cup 1930 might have been like. But I don't think the diary, as published in Four Weeks In Montevideo, is a reliable historical document or even an important one.
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