Buy Used
£1.97
FREE Delivery on orders over £10.
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by the book house
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: This item will be picked, packed and shipped by Amazon and is eligible for free delivery within the UK
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Forge Of God Paperback – 20 Jul 1989


See all 14 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback, 20 Jul 1989
£97.78 £0.01


Product details

  • Paperback: 1 pages
  • Publisher: Orbit; New edition edition (20 July 1989)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0099618702
  • ISBN-13: 978-0099618706
  • Product Dimensions: 17.8 x 3.2 x 11 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (23 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,103,019 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

Review

engaging, gripping and scarily readable ... a great read. (SFFworld.com) --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

Book Description

A stunning novel of alien invasion from a master of the genre. --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse and search another edition of this book.
First Sentence
Arthur Gordon stood in the darkness by the bank of the Rogue River, having walked a dozen yards away from his house and family and guests, momentarily weary of company. Read the first page
Explore More
Concordance
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Excerpt | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

3.9 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

21 of 23 people found the following review helpful By M&RLove on 4 Aug. 2000
Format: Paperback
I stumbled across Greg Bear and this book about 3 years ago. It really blew me away! I have re-read the book a couple of times and the emotion of the finale still bites too deep for comfort. Who says hard sci-fi cannot be for the heart as well as the head... The reworkings and discarding of familiar sci-fi themes is very clever and makes you continually have to reevaluate the book as you read on. If you have not already read this book, BUY IT! Then go out and buy EON. The only guy giving Bear a run for his money is Peter Hamilton (Reality Dysfunction, et al). It does not get better than this.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By M. Yon on 24 Dec. 2010
Format: Paperback
Here's a welcome re-release, originally from 1987. This was Greg's fourth novel. It was nominated for the Nebula Award for Best Novel in 1987, and was also nominated for the Hugo and Locus Awards in 1988.

It is basically a combination of alien invasion novel and global catastrophe tale. As with the best of these tales, it starts simply. Set in contemporary times (well, 1996), it tells us of what happens when there are a number of seemingly-relatively minor solar system anomalies. Astronomers suddenly notice that Europa, the moon orbiting Jupiter, disappears. This is perceived with little interest by the non-astronomer general public. Then mountains are discovered in the Mojave Desert in the USA and in Australia, in areas where less than a year before there were no mountains.

What these are in actual fact are two spaceships. In the case of the spacecraft crashing in the Californian Mojave desert, there is a dying alien, in its own words, `a flea', hitchhiking a ride with superior beings. In English, it tells its discoverers that it is very sorry to bring bad news but that the Earth is doomed.

In the case of the Australian ship we have metallic silver floating gourd-shapes telling people that they come in peace for our benefit.

The truth is sadly more sinister. What is happening is that the aliens, attracted by radio signals emitted from Earth, have brought with them two `bullets' of neutronium and anti-neutronium that are eating through the interior of the Earth. Their meeting will be the end of the Earth as we know it. Moreover there is the scary realisation that this is deliberate: it is this that creates the matter used to birth more alien spaceships, a force created by a mechanical alien species who look at humans as if they are a lower lifeform.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Patrick Borer on 15 Jan. 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Bear's 1987 novel "The Forge of God" is the second book by this author I've read after "Hull Zero Three" (2010). They have in common that the main plot turns out to be surprisingly straightforward, though not to the protagonists who try to cope with an environment that has suddenly become very puzzling and frightening. This book's basic idea is bold and carried out consistently to the end. Still, it feels a bit drawn-out at times. The author spends much time on attempts at character development, not thoroughly successful. The best character in "The Forge of God" may be one Bear hasn't tried to flesh out too meticulously: The hapless, dispirited American president who in the end is both right and wrong. Altogether, I liked "The Forge of God", but "Hull Zero Three" with its focus on one protagonist instead of trying to make the reader sympathize with a dozen seems better executed.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
9 of 11 people found the following review helpful By "chrishyams" on 11 July 2000
Format: Paperback
I read The Forge of God over the course of a single weekend (yes, sad but true) and have to say that it's the most fantastic, epic and disturbing book I've read in many, many years.
The build-up is well-paced, the character's are all fully believable and the finale is as epic (and as depressing) as it gets. Bear's sequel, Anvil Of Stars, is just as impressive.
This is crying out to be made into a film with a good sci-fi director (Scott, Cameron, Hyams, Fincher) at the helm, along with Bear's classic 'Eon'. Although Bear prefers to keep on writing epic, near-future sci-fi such as his brilliant new Darwin's Radio, perhaps he could consider taking time-out to carefully develop The Forge of God into a screenplay. Putting images to this fabulous story would be the icing on the cake (that's if Bear's infamous 'Planet Eaters' don't gobble it up first)
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Mr. D. J. Walford on 16 Jan. 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I must confess, after reading the blurb attached to Mr. Bear's book I assumed that it was some sort of comedy. A moon vanishes and then aliens arrive baring bad news ?? "Must be a humourous read" I thought.....

Boy was I wrong !! Greg Bear describes in detail just what happens when two different species of alien arrive, both at the same time, both of whom are being economical with the truth as to their reasons for visiting. With characters you care about and want to see succeed in their survival, Mr. Bear's story takes us on a bleak and certainly "terminal" road to earth's destruction at the hands of aliens who, whilst not necessarily evil, are determined to finish their task !!

The book is only 325 pages long, however, it feels a lot longer. This no way inhibits the story but I do feel that a lack of direction plagues the middle part of the novel, also, there are some characters who just disappear when I wanted to know more about them. In addition, one does need a certain amount of patience when reading all the technical jargon (some of which went over my head), but again, this does not ruin the book, I picked up the gist of what was going on easily and quickly.

I will certainly read more of Greg Bear's work
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews



Feedback