Forever Delayed [Clean]
 
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Forever Delayed [Clean]

15 Oct 2012 | Format: MP3

£7.09 (VAT included if applicable)
Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
1
4:20
30
2
5:05
30
3
4:51
30
4
4:06
30
5
3:47
30
6
3:15
30
7
3:42
30
8
4:22
30
9
3:24
30
10
3:49
30
11
3:22
30
12
3:20
30
13
4:40
30
14
3:06
30
15
3:53
30
16
4:12
30
17
3:28
30
18
3:46
30
19
4:06
30
20
3:59


Product details

  • Original Release Date: 12 Oct 2012
  • Release Date: 12 Oct 2012
  • Label: Epic
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 1:18:33
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B001GUGAXY
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (58 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 12,270 in MP3 Albums (See Top 100 in MP3 Albums)

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Robert Williams on 25 May 2007
Format: Audio CD
Forever Delayed is OK. It essentially compiles the Manics' most accessible singles but its trump card is that a quarter of the twenty songs have never previously been available on any album. I don't have a problem with the tracklisting. There's a time a place for everything, and the place for The Intense Humming Of Evil isn't on a Greatest Hits. I also think that the 'radio anthem' side of the Manics isn't celebrated enough, and it's telling that their most cherished song Motorcycle Emptiness feels totally at home snuggled up to You Stole The Sun From My Heart and Australia.

The main flaw with the collection is that they've had to edit quite a lot of the tracks to fit all twenty on. In some instances this means including the radio edits, in others the radio edits have been edited (!). This lets it down, and it's also now two albums out of date, so hopefully one day we'll get a more comprehensive Manics primer. I like the format of the Pet Shop Boys compilation Pop Art, with one disc containing their big radio anthems and the other gathering together their more 'arty' side. It would work well for the Manics - a band who can never please everyone.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By R. Janis on 8 July 2003
Format: Audio CD
For someone relatively new to MSP (first picked up on them in 2000), but more recently familiar with the Richey-era, "Forever Delayed" makes a great starting point for anyone curious about the band. If I had followed the band from very early in the nineties, I would probably also bemoan the lack of songs from "The Holy Bible" in favor of the "Everything Must Go" and "This Is My Truth" period. Just the same, this collection provides a good balance of past and present. Besides, it's not as if the beautiful "Motorcycle Emptiness" had been left off the running order. Even the tracks from the misguided mess "Know Your Enemy" fit fine here, though I'd have to agree with several reviews that "Ocean Spray" and "Let Robeson Sing" would have been welcome. The best surprise, though, would be "There By The Grace Of God", a fantastic single that shows the band could be back on the upswing.
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Format: Audio CD
Manic Street Preachers are undoubtedly one of the best British bands of the last 20 years. Forever Delayed contains many of their best songs though its compilation is rather skewed against certain albums.

First the good news - the five best songs from the band's first two rather patchy albums are featured even though they weren't necessarily the biggest hits. Yes, doomed anthems Motorcycle Emptiness and From Despair To Where are included alongside the cocky You Love Us, La Tristesse Durera and lyrically poignant pop of Little Baby Nothing.

Album number three for the Manics was the harrowing, nihilistic art-rock of The Holy Bible, now considered by many to be the band's masterpiece. So why is only the exhilarating Faster included from it on Forever Delayed. She Is Suffering and Revol were also Top 30 hits so why couldn't at least one of them feature - possibly at the expense of some of the four tracks included from each of the band's subsequent two albums, the triumphant Everything Must Go and This Is My Truth Tell Me Yours.

Forever Delayed breaks off after album number six by the band. Be My Enemy was relatively speaking, a commercial and critical failure though surely the moving Ocean Spray should have been included in addition to the untypical Beach Boys like pop of So Why So Sad. The best of also includes a couple of non-album singles in The Masses Against The Classes and the band's sadly poignant cover of Suicide Is Painless (Theme From MASH). It also features two new tracks There By The Grace Of God and Door To The River, which, unusually for new tracks tagged onto compilation albums, are excellent and well worth their place.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By "eric_rocks" on 10 May 2003
Format: Audio CD
Undeniably a compilation aimed mainly at the uninitiated, Forever Delayed still manages to pack in 20 classic singles. The inclusion of the previously non-album tracks Motown Junk, The Masses Against the Classes and Suicide is Painless, allied with the two new songs There By the Grace of God and the sublime Door to the River, also make this a worthy purchase for seasoned fans. Starting off with a contender for song of the '90s, A Design For Life, the album flows along a river of catchy tunes and thoughtful lyrics. It doesn't include career highlights Roses in the Hospital and Stay Beautiful, or the charming Ocean Spray and Let Robeson Sing from Know Your Enemy, but apart from that it is difficult to argue that this isn't the best compilation the band could deliver.
Some of the tracks have been edited to fit on to the disc. In some cases this works (the shortening of the solos of From Despair to Where and Suicide is Painless will be unnoticeable to the majority) and in some it doesn't (cutting two full minutes of The Everlasting takes away the song's epic feel, which is its saving grace). No two people will find themselves agreeing with the tracklisting for a Manics compilation, so we are left having to accept the job done by the band themselves, and most of the time it's spot on.
A fine document of a great band, which would have been better if they had allowed themselves the double-CD needed to fit in their lengthy and amazing career.
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