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Foreign currency deposits and the demand for money in developing countries (IMF working paper)

3.8 out of 5 stars 23 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Unknown Binding: 35 pages
  • Publisher: International Monetary Fund (1992)
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B0006DL8LQ
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (23 customer reviews)

More About the Author

Margaret Atwood is the author of more than thirty books of fiction, poetry and critical essays.

In addition to the classic The Handmaid's Tale, her novels include Cat's Eye, shortlisted for the Booker Prize, Alias Grace, which won the Giller Prize in Canada and the Premio Mondello in Italy, The Blind Assassin, winner of the 2000 Booker Prize and Oryx and Crake, shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize. Her most recent novel, The Year of the Flood, was published in 2009. She was awarded the Prince of Asturias Prize for Literature in 2008.

Margaret Atwood lives in Toronto, Canada.

(Photo credit: George Whitside)

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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
'Lady Oracle' tells the story of serious feminist writer Joan Foster, (the Lady Oracle of the title) and her secret life as gothic-romance writer Louisa Delacourt, from Joan's life from a chubby child, her conflict with her mother who wants the perfect daughter, her battle to lose weight, bizarre affairs, (one with a Polish Count and another with an artist named 'The Royal Porcupine',) eventual marriage to the pasteboard Arthur, and the bizarre way in which she leaves the mundanity of her marriage to quite literally begin a new life.
The novel opens with the fantastic line 'I planned my death carefully; unlike my life, which meandered along from one thing to another, despite my feeble attempts to control it' and goes on to explain that the narrator has faked her own death in order to escape both her stillborn marriage and a blackmail attempt by the mysterious Fraser Buchanan.
It then continues with vivid, moving, and highly amusing accounts of her childhood. The narrator was a fat person until her late adolescense, and here Atwood gives a voice to the underrepresented and oppressed overweight of today's society. Joan's battles with her mother, of which her body was the battleground, are telling of a society where it is unacceptable to be anything except a perfect ten.
Atwood then alternates the narrative of the story with extracts from the gothic romance her narrator is writing: 'Stalked by love.' It is in these extracts, and the narrator's thoughts on them, that Atwood's trademark insightfulness truly flourishes, as even the most militant feminist finds herself confessing that what they really want is a Rochester. I particularly like the quotation 'Escape wasn't a luxury for (my readers), it was a necessity ...
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2 Comments 28 of 28 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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Format: Paperback
The only thing I found disappointing about this book is that it came to an end. I therefore immediately went out and bought The Edible Woman so that I could stay in Atwood's world a bit longer.
Margaret Atwood has such a wonderful way of telling the story about an ordinary woman - she isn't beautiful beyond imagination, she doesn't have fantastically wonderful relationships, a model husband and unrealistically good looking children, she is simply Joan Foster, with long red hair and, as one of the characters puts it "built like a brick nuthouse". But she doesn't need to have all the above things because Margaret has given her character a wonderfully touching and extraordinary life. Extraordinary because it is so ordinary!!!
Atwood strikes exactly the right balance in this book between moments of raw pain (Joan's childhood and relationship with her mother) and comic moments. I really really loved this book. It doesn't really have a proper ending but it wouldn't have because this is a snapshot of someone's life so it wouldnt tie up neatly at the end as you would not then be left wondering how Joan gets on.
Some people have moaned that Atwood includes too much detail in her novels but I think this is tosh - the details make it more real - who wants to read a book where the characters don't eat, sleep, burp, become obese, look ugly, in short, they don't behave like real people.
She has a wonderful way of describing relationships, especially the tensions and misapprehensions but by far the most chilling, Atwood can convey exactly the relationship between a bully and a victim and this is a common theme in her novels. It can be very unnerving to read especially if you yourself have been through similar experiences but then again, that just goes towards making the book more "real".
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Format: Paperback
I first read a Margaret Atwood novel only 2 years ago and since then I have managed to read them all as they are mostly fasinating.Since her international breakthrough novel puplished in the early 80s the Handmaiden's Tale, her novels have mostly been of the highest quality (the Penolopiad is an exception).Her early novels dating from the 60s while interesting and showing a promising talent can at times seem dated and a little lacking in action.
This novel however is still as fresh as when it was first puplished in the 1970s.It also shows some of the later themes of Atwood's novels. The novel starts towards the end of the story and gaps are filled in to bring the reader up to date.The main female character has had a bullied upbringing and exotic affairs (Cats Eye and The Robber Bride ). There is even a subplot consisting of the main character's own fiction making an appearance on the page (The Blind Assassin).If you have already read and enjoyed Atwood's later novels this book is well worth reading.
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Format: Paperback
The opening of the novel is certainly gripping and immediately the reader wants to know why the narrator has planned their own death. It is this starting point that draws you in, but I'm afraid this intensity doesn't really last beyond the first few chapters.

The novel is basically about the life of the narrator, leading up to present day where the story began with revealing they had planned their own death. The plot then moves forward and shows how the narrator has dealt with this new-found isolation and whether she has in fact succeeded in fooling the world.

Whilst reading this book I was hoping for something more than just a recollection of the character's life. True, it is evident that the narrator is quite a paranoid person and the opening of the story makes more and more sense as you read on, but I found myself seeking something beyond this recollection. Perhaps a bit more action rather than reflection.

The narrator is a writer and Atwood includes excerpts from the books that she is writing. These are quite entertaining to read and provide a light-hearted escape from the development of the story, even if the books that are written are just "trashy novels". As a result, I found the main story line a little suffocating because of the emotions that the character professes and the negativity, particularly surrounding her growing up and her relationship with her mother.

This is the second Margaret Atwood novel I have read and I am convinced there are better ones out there (like `The Handmaid's Tale'). Many people have told me how great her novels are so I think I have just chosen a spanner in the works. It is not one I would recommend and think I need to read some more of her works to get a better flavour of her writing style.
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