Includes FREE MP3
version
of this album.
or
Sign in to turn on 1-Click ordering.
More Buying Choices
Have one to sell? Sell yours here
Available to Download Now
 
Buy the MP3 album for £8.99
 
 
 
 
Sorry, this item is not available in
Image not available for
Colour:
Image not available

 

Forbidden Planets: Music From The Pioneers Of Electronic Sound [CD]

Various Artists Audio CD
4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
Price: £8.26 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £10. Details
o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o
 : Includes FREE MP3 version of this album.
   Does not apply to gift orders. See Terms and Conditions for important information about costs that may apply for the MP3 version in case of returns and cancellations.
Only 6 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
Want it tomorrow, 24 Aug.? Choose Express delivery at checkout. Details
Complete your purchase to add the MP3 version to your Amazon music library. Provided by Amazon EU S.à r.l.
Buy the MP3 album for £8.99 at the Amazon Digital Music Store.


Frequently Bought Together

Forbidden Planets: Music From The Pioneers Of Electronic Sound + Forbidden Planets, Vol. 2: More Music From The Pioneers Of Electronic Sound + Deutsche Elektronische Musik
Price For All Three: £29.97

Buy the selected items together

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought


Product details

  • Audio CD (1 Mar 2010)
  • Number of Discs: 2
  • Format: CD
  • Label: Chrome Dreams
  • ASIN: B002X5QXS8
  • Other Editions: MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 8,578 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Listen to Samples and Buy MP3s

Songs from this album are available to purchase as MP3s. Click on "Buy MP3" or view the MP3 Album.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         


Disc 1:

Samples
Song TitleArtist Time Price
Listen  1. Spellbound (Prelude)Miklós Rózsa 2:58£0.69  Buy MP3 
Listen  2. Etude Aux Chemins De FerPierre Schaeffer 2:51£0.69  Buy MP3 
Listen  3. Prelude/Outer Space/RadarBernard Herrmann 3:48£0.69  Buy MP3 
Listen  4. Nocturne/The Flashlight/The Robot/Space ControlBernard Herrmann 6:00£0.69  Buy MP3 
Listen  5. Klang Im Unbegrenzten RaumHerbert Eimert/Robert Beyer10:28Album Only
Listen  6. Imaginary LandscapeJohn Cage 8:22£0.69  Buy MP3 
Listen  7. KlangstudieHerbert Eimert/Robert Beyer 4:31£0.69  Buy MP3 
Listen  8. Studie 1Karlheinz Stockhausen 9:27£0.69  Buy MP3 
Listen  9. Formanten I-IIPaul Gredinger 4:35£0.69  Buy MP3 
Listen10. Seismagramme I-IIHenri Pousseur 6:31£0.69  Buy MP3 
Listen11. Gesang Der JuenglingeKarlheinz Stockhausen13:03Album Only


Disc 2:

Samples
Song TitleArtist Time Price
Listen  1. Main Titles/OvertureLouis And Bebe Barron 2:23£0.69  Buy MP3 
Listen  2. Elektronische Komposition 1Herman Heiss 5:14£0.69  Buy MP3 
Listen  3. Battle with the Invisible MonsterLouis And Bebe Barron 2:57£0.69  Buy MP3 
Listen  4. ScambiHenri Pousseur 6:29£0.69  Buy MP3 
Listen  5. DiamorphosesIannis Xenakis 6:54£0.69  Buy MP3 
Listen  6. Song of the Second MoonKid Baltan 3:08£0.69  Buy MP3 
Listen  7. OceanBBC Radiophonic Workshop 1:08£0.69  Buy MP3 
Listen  8. SyncopationTom Dissevelt 3:02£0.69  Buy MP3 
Listen  9. Poeme ElectroniqueEdgar Varese 8:02£0.69  Buy MP3 
Listen10. ArtikulationGyörgy Ligeti 3:48£0.69  Buy MP3 
Listen11. Evolutionen Ballet MusicHenk Badings13:39Album Only
Listen12. WhirlingTom Dissevelt 2:37£0.69  Buy MP3 
Listen13. Fontana MixJohn Cage11:33Album Only


Product Description

CD Description

With Electronic music s current resurgence and interest in the form at an all time high, this superb 2 CD set, containing compositions and original recordings by the pioneers of this fascinating style of sound, compiled here for the first time, is certain to attract enormous excitement amongst fans of the genre. Featuring tracks recorded largely in the 1940s, 50s and 60s, from names as diverse as the ever popular John Cage, Frank Zappa s idol, Edgar Varese, Sergeant Pepper cover star Karlheinz Stockhausen and even Auntie herself in the form of the BBC Radiophonic Workshop [unlikely contenders perhaps, but nevertheless leaders in the development of sonic electronics], this compilation features the bizarre, the avant-garde , the experimental and even, on occasion, the fairly melodic. A treat for fans of contemporary names such as Joe Meek, Kraftwerk, Can, Tangerine Dream, The Prodigy, Throbbing Gristle providing guidance on the roots of their chosen artist s muse, the potential market for this extraordinary collection is enormous. Compiled - and with extensive sleevenotes by - 1950s/60s music historian [and Edgar Varese biographer] Alan Clayson, and featuring 16 page illustrated booklet, and finished in deluxe slipcase packaging, this beautifully designed set will surely become the standard collection of the original electronica.

Customer Reviews

3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
4.7 out of 5 stars
4.7 out of 5 stars
Most Helpful Customer Reviews
17 of 17 people found the following review helpful
Format:Audio CD|Verified Purchase
When I went to high school in the early 90's, I became interested in the start of the early electronic soundscapes of the 50's. I got some books to read, but it was harder to get to listen to the music on record.

I asked the prime classic CD vendors in Sweden at the time, but the answer I got was something like "Well, ask the library at the Royal Collage of Music. They might have something."

Time passed. I got some stuff from the 60's and some Theremin albums. Xenakis. Ralph Lundsten. Compilations from Elektronmusikstudion and the BBC Workshop.

But I still missed a lot of the tracks I have read about.

Then, in the early noughties, I bought the Ohm+: the Early Gurus of Electronic Music 1948 - 1980/3CD+DVD box (or rather the earlier one without the DVD). Great stuff, but still some - mostly German stuff - was missing.

If I today would recommend a starting point for the young person interested in the roots of electronic music, I would recommend this double CD: There are so many essential tracks here: "Klangstudie 2", "Gesang Der Juenglinge ", "Poeme Electronique" and two tracks from the film Forbidden Planet.

The sound quality and track order is good, but the liner notes are not great. The text looks like it is a compacted version of another text and at times hard to grasp. Instead, I recommend the book Electric Sound: the Past and Promise of Electronic Music as an complement.

Forbidden Planets Volume Two is not bad, either. But buy this one first!

And one more thing. Why is it that they have left out Clara Rockmore, Samuel J. Hoffman or the Theremin at large in this series?
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
23 of 23 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Imaginary landscapes and futurist film tracks 2 Dec 2010
Format:Audio CD
Here's the nexus where the academic highbrow rubs up against the populist score-masters of early cold war sci-fi cinema. Most anthologies of early electronic music eschew the mixing of the two streams, generally opting for the more furrow-browed approach. But on comparing Stockhausen's "first masterpiece of electronic music", 1955's Gesang Der Juenglinge, with big screen helpings from Bernard Hermann and Louis and Bebe Barron, the juxtaposition makes total sense.

Movie music by the end of the post-World War II decade was every bit as otherworldly and out-there as those experiments conducted in the world's preeminent educational institutions, attempting to evoke the new climate of fear brought about by the predominantly psychological clash of the two global superpowers. As Alan Clayson observes in his sleevenotes, "To many, the notion of machine-music was unnatural, synthetic... creepy," perfect for the suspenseful atmospheres prevalent in the science-fiction and horror flicks of the time. This ecology of fear is nowhere more evident than on Hermann's score for Robert Wise's masterwork The Day The Earth Stood Still (1951), a spellbinding assault structured along a spine of sine-wave generations and acute spectral theremin assault.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
10 of 17 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars weird electronic sounds here we go 13 Mar 2011
Format:Audio CD
this is a real good collection of strange electronic bbc radiophonic type music and background scoresForbidden Planets - Music From the Pioneers of Electronic Sound. if you like strange , minimalistic and atmospheric sounds then get this album
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.5 out of 5 stars  4 reviews
9 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Imaginary landscapes and futurist film tracks 2 Dec 2010
By Reckless Relic - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
Here's the nexus where the academic highbrow rubs up against the populist score-masters of early cold war sci-fi cinema. Most anthologies of early electronic music eschew the mixing of the two streams, generally opting for the more furrow-browed approach. But on comparing Stockhausen's "first masterpiece of electronic music", 1955's Gesang Der Juenglinge, with big screen helpings from Bernard Hermann and Louis and Bebe Barron, the juxtaposition makes total sense.

Movie music by the end of the post-World War II decade was every bit as otherworldly and out-there as those experiments conducted in the world's preeminent educational institutions, attempting to evoke the new climate of fear brought about by the predominantly psychological clash of the two global superpowers. As Alan Clayson observes in his sleevenotes, "To many, the notion of machine-music was unnatural, synthetic... creepy," perfect for the suspenseful atmospheres prevalent in the science-fiction and horror flicks of the time. This ecology of fear is nowhere more evident than on Hermann's score for Robert Wise's masterwork The Day The Earth Stood Still (1951), a spellbinding assault structured along a spine of sine-wave generations and acute spectral theremin assault
5 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Wonderment and the Echos of Laughter in the Abyss 16 Jun 2011
By Leo Rivers - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
Laughter and wonder go hand-in-hand with embarrassment and fear in a sense of being alive. This kind of music delighted children then and now because it is surprising. It is like breaking wind or a belch, the element of not being anticipated elicits both an embarrassment which is binding of energy and a transgressive release of energy because we naturally identify with the sheep that runs away from the rest of the flock being herded by a sheep dog on a hill. The thing about electronic music in the 40s and 50s is that no matter how intellectual the thinkers were or what kind of concepts used to impose on the sounds the truth was that they were discovering both their instruments and the sounds the instruments were making along with the audience. This aspect of being new in one direction is being taken as strange and thus works with horror movies and science fiction movies where one is unknown has to numinousity of death but the wonder of newness. Even when theremins and electronic "boops and bops" became the sound motifs you expected in horror movies and science fiction - the very genre itself remaindered an excuse to enjoy as a child. This is probably the essence of electronic music, its artificiality has cut it loose from history, electronic music by nature presumed to be the folklore music of the future. At least in expectation. And of course such an idea is ridiculous, so for all of its structural ingenuity and musical deep design, electronic music retains the ability to be refreshing in the ear. This selection has a twinkling eye on the silly and the original contexts of beloved old movies, but as I said, it is that context of being old science fiction movies and old horror movies that forgives us ahead of time this sweet permission to enjoy. There are much more formal collections of electronic music but few could be said to educate the ear in being an open ear with the ease of this one. Leo Rivers
5.0 out of 5 stars Analog electronics for everybody. 15 July 2013
By Charles Baker - Published on Amazon.com
Verified Purchase
If you don't like Analog electronic music, *this* is the album that would change that: accessible, fun, different, odd, beautiful....this is some of the best of the first full generation of electronic music... and it is very cool...do give it a listen!!
0 of 6 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars fair representation of this dated genre 9 July 2013
By Claude Raquin - Published on Amazon.com
Verified Purchase
Several tracks (Stockhausen, Pousseur, Ligeti) represent the best of the category. Several others seem to have been added as fillers, with no artistic merit.
Were these reviews helpful?   Let us know
Search Customer Reviews
Only search this product's reviews

Customer Discussions

This product's forum
Discussion Replies Latest Post
No discussions yet

Ask questions, Share opinions, Gain insight
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 

Search Customer Discussions
Search all Amazon discussions
   


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Look for similar items by category


Feedback