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For the roses (1972) / Vinyl record [Vinyl-LP] Import


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When the dust settles, Joni Mitchell may stand as the most important and influential female recording artist of the late 20th century. Uncompromising and iconoclastic, Mitchell confounded expectations at every turn; restlessly innovative, her music evolved from deeply personal folk stylings into pop, jazz, avant-garde, and even world music, presaging the multicultural experimentation of the ... Read more in Amazon's Joni Mitchell Store

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Product details

  • Vinyl
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Import
  • Label: Import
  • ASIN: B005NAT1N4
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Audio Cassette  |  Vinyl  |  MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (19 customer reviews)

Customer Reviews

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19 of 20 people found the following review helpful By "ggmackie" on 23 Dec 2005
Format: Audio CD
Mitchell worte this material largely in social solitude after the success of 'Blue. Increasing self revelation in her work left her feeling 'naked' and led to a year away from society in the Canadian back-bush without running water or elctricity. The result? Some of the best work she ever produced. The poetry is stunning and incisive. Musically it was another one of her seemingly endless transition periods. No hippy minstrel here. The dulcimer gone (it only appeared on Blue) , piano and guitar are backed by Tom Scott ( he of the LA Express whose collaboraion would continue in successive works) and some of the finest session musicians of the period. It is stark at times and deeply personal but the fight back is clear in her tone. The naked picture ( see line one above) appeared in inside of the gatefold version of the record album as opposed to the cover as it was suggested that she would 'not be happy with the price sticker on her ass' in stores. She was criticised for comparing herself to Beethoven in the final track also known as 'Ludwig's Tune"
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32 of 35 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 25 May 2002
Format: Audio CD
Joni Mitchell's fifth album, 'For The Roses', is such a huge step forward from 'Blue' it is hard to believe it was released the year after 'Blue' in 1972.
This startling collection kicks off with the haunting 'Banquet', featuring just Joni and her beloved piano. 'Cold Blue Steel And Sweet Fire' contains woodwind instruments and is an overall harder song to get into - but it is still one of the album's many highlights. 'Barangrill' comes next, an odd little folk-jazz tune. It is not overlong and it makes for enjoyable listening. 'Lesson In Survival' is one of the few songs on 'For The Roses' that remains not as hummable or memorable as any of the others after a few listens. But as with all Joni albums, the songs that do not stand out immediately are actually one of the most important ones and they demonstrate Joni's fabulous artistry perfectly. 'Let The Wind Carry Me' is a beautifully depressing ballad about "bad" parenting and the title track is a wonderful folk number that sounds vaguely like a softer version of Alanis Morissette's '21 Things I Want In A Lover' (in the verse). 'Electricity' is a memorable midtempo tune and focuses on the power of Joni's melodies and her pure voice. One of the highest highlights! 'See You Sometime' is still very good, even if it lacks the power of some other songs on the album. 'You Turn Me On I'm A Radio' is the "mainstream" song of the album but often doesn't sound it along with the other "non-mainstream" songs. It is a great tune, but actually not the best track on 'For The Roses'. 'Blonde In The Bleachers' is saved from being a bit boring by a great rock'n'roll coda, an element on 'For The Roses' that stands out as being a sign of Joni's subsequent "experimental period".
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By R. H. Ozzie on 21 Mar 2008
Format: Audio CD
I love this album. I had it on vinyl years ago but have only recently rediscovered Joni Mitchell. I was put off by Blue which I think is a rather over rated album. It doesn't grab me in the way For The Roses and Hissing of Summer Lawns do. For the Roses is complex and deep but rewards with perseverence. It really grows on you (bad pun, sorry). Her lyrics are so poetic and still original. Some, like Cold Blue Steel and Sweet Fire are hard hitting, about the abuse of Heroin (I think), 'Red water in the bathroom sink, Fever and the scum brown bowl' she sings in a plaintive, sweet voice. Others, like Banquet, have a social conscience edginess, 'who let the greedy in, who left the needy out'. A lot of the songs deal with losing a lover and the agony of separation. Could these have been aimed at David Crosby?. In Blonde in the Bleachers she sings 'She tapes her regrets to the microphone stand, She says, 'You can't hold the hand of a rock and roll man very long''. In the last song she seems to explain all that has gone before in the lines 'Condemned to wires and hammers, Strike every chord that you feel, That broken trees and elephant ivories conceal'. It's an angry, frustrated album but, at the same time beautiful and touching.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Lozarithm VINE VOICE on 6 Aug 2004
Format: Audio CD
It was perhaps inevitable that a gifted singer-songwriter in the sixties who began performing in clubs and bars using guitar and occasional piano would use the folk idiom as the vehicle for her art.
For The Roses for the first time showed that her musical language naturally spread far wider. By simply switching the emphasis from guitar to piano she was able to demonstrate her ease with blues, jazz and even a little tasteful rock on the throwaway single You Turn Me On, I'm A Radio.
More popular in the UK than in the North American continent, judging by her album sales to this point, this album perversely reversed her fortunes, reaching no. 11 in the US but not charting over here, despite highlights like Cold Blue Steel And Sweet Fire, with James Burton's guitar; the evocative Five Easy Pieces world of Barandgrill; and her best piece to date, Woman Of Heart And Mind.
The non-album B-side Urge For Going, a previously unrecorded early song, performed acoustically, would have made an excellent bonus track for the HDCD re-issue. Perhaps next time
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