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For the Win Hardcover – 12 May 2010


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Product details

  • Hardcover: 400 pages
  • Publisher: Harper Voyager (12 May 2010)
  • Language: Unknown
  • ISBN-10: 0007352018
  • ISBN-13: 978-0007352012
  • Product Dimensions: 16.5 x 24.4 x 4.2 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (44 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 907,277 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Canadian-born Cory Doctorow is the author of the New York Times bestselling novel Little Brother. He has won the Locus Award for his fiction three times, been nominated for both the Hugo and the Nebula, and is the only author to have won both the John W. Campbell Award for Best New Writer and the Campbell Award for best SF Novel of the Year. He is the co-editor of BoingBoing.net, writes columns for Make, Information Week, the Guardian online and Locus and has been named one of the internet's top 25 influencers by Forbes magazine and a Young Global Leader by the World Economic Forum. Cory Doctorow lives in London with his wife and daughter.

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Review

‘Combines the real and virtual worlds in style. A cracking read’ Sun

‘Doctorow isn't afraid of taking on big ideas and difficult themes… An exhilarating, unputdownable novel’ Guardian

‘Topical, scarily believeable near-future novel’ Bookseller

Praise for Little Brother:

‘I’d recommend ‘Little Brother’ over pretty much any book I’ve read this year. Because I think it’ll change lives. It’s a wonderful, important book’ Neil Gaiman

‘Cory Doctorow’s novel could hardly be more relevant, scary and eye-opening … seriously entertaining.’ The Times

‘A cracking read’ Guardian

‘A well structured and superbly executed thriller with breakneck pacing and an emotional payoff to boot. Engaging, thought provoking, and at times harrowing.SciFi Now

‘An entertaining thriller and a thoughful polemic on Internet-era civil rights … a terrific read’ New York Times

‘A compulsive and chillingly credible read … would make a great discussion for any reading group’ New Books

‘A tale of struggle familiar to any teenager, about those moments when you choose what your life is going to mean.’ Steven Gould, author of ‘Jumper’

‘A timely and at times frightening read that is sure to resonate with a generation of computer-savvy teens, but also with those who have never heard of an arphid or re-built a hard drive’ Sun Herald (Australia)

About the Author

Canadian-born Cory Doctorow is the author of the New York Times bestselling novel Little Brother. He has won the Locus Award for his fiction three times, been nominated for both the Hugo and the Nebula, and is the only author to have won both the John W. Campbell Award for Best New Writer and the Campbell Award for best SF Novel of the Year. He is the co-editor of BoingBoing.net, writes columns for Make, Information Week, the Guardian online and Locus and has been named one of the internet's top 25 influencers by Forbes magazine and a Young Global Leader by the World Economic Forum. Cory Doctorow lives in London with his wife and daughter.


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Customer Reviews

3.9 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Mr. B. Trotter VINE VOICE on 7 May 2010
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
Those who play MMOGs will have many a little chuckle when they read this book, buying virtual money with real money is part and parcel of the online game scene, love it or hate it, it's there.
For the Win takes place in the near future, when multiplayer online games--descendants of Everquest and World of Warcraft have continued to rise in popularity.
Gold farmers work long hours under harsh conditions to harvest digital items and currency from the games so they can be sold for real cash. When they realize they are being mistreated, they begin to come together and fight for their rights, in both the real world and in their virtual world.
The story of unions, economics, and video games that Doctorow has created is exciting and eye-opening. It will probably appeal most to nerdier, technology-oriented types with an interest in the money game that makes the world go 'round, but almost anyone could find something to enjoy here.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Quicksilver TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 20 April 2010
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
This is the third Cory Doctorow novel I have read. The first, Little Brother is a tightly plotted techno-thriller, that examines the abuse of technology in the war on terror. The second, Makers is a much more bloated affair, detailing the use of future technologies to bring about an economic new world order. 'For The Win' sits somewhere between the two.

Again, we are in the near future. 'For The Win' features a host of disparate characters all tied to the multi-million dollar gaming industry. In essence, this is a tale about the powerful and rich exploiting the weak and poor. Many of the characters 'farm' computer world gold, which can then be sold for real money, through the black market. These farmers work on repetitive in-game tasks, in sweatshops run by unscrupulous bosses. They are paid a pittance whilst the bosses cream off all the money. The novel charts the exploits of a group of works campaigning for better rights for the oppressed farmers.

My game playing days are sadly now behind me, but I found the central premise intriguing. That there is serious money to be made by hoarding a virtual asset in something as facile as a computer game is barely credulous, but Doctorow knows this stuff inside out. There is no doubting the integrity of his information, or his vision of the future. Unfortunately the resulting novel just isn't that exciting.

There are some great sections in the novel, Doctorow's vision is breathtaking, but once again (like 'Makers') his story becomes bogged down in the details.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By J. Baldwin VINE VOICE on 17 Jun. 2010
Format: Hardcover
I had my doubts about this book, given that I often find myself disagreeing with most of Doctorow's journalism and hard-core tech attitudes - though never doubting his expertise. (To irritate the author, I'm reading the book on my iPad!)

However this book immediately draws you in with it's brief episodic beginning. It's written like a screenplay with short scenes that paint a vivid picture of the characters and their situations. If you're familiar with online gaming you'll get the situation immediately, and if you're not, you will soon begin to wonder what MMORPGs have to offer.
The characters are all young, set up in some way against authority and the world of adults - adrift in a world where the only escape is to adopt a different character either in real life or the virtual one.
The characters are appealing, even if their situations are not, whether it's the poor quarters of China or India, or the more affluent suburbs of America.
Only one thing really jars with this book - the mention of Coca Cola as one of the games' producers. It just doesn't fit in an otherwise fictional world, this one beacon of specific reality (especially as they aren't, to my knowledge, in the software business). Why Coca Cola? It just sticks out like a sore thumb. That's why I only give it four stars - occasionally the book reads like it needed a stronger editor. But only occasionally.

Well written, with a powerful female character that makes this appealing to all genders and all ages, the battle sequences will have you gripped. Recommended for older kids or adults who like a good story.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Mark H TOP 500 REVIEWER on 15 April 2010
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
I've been fortunate enough to read and review all of Cory Doctorows novels to date and I am becoming familiar and fond of his writing. This latest novel will feel quite familiar to those who have read Makers and Big Brother, but it is different enough to make it a very worthwhile endeavour.

This time the author turns his well tuned social antenna towards a new style of economics. Or should that be an old style with a new cyber suit on it? I will do my very best not to spoil the enjoyment of anyone thinking of buying this so no plot twists and turns shall be revealed here. The story has its basis in the near future in a world where one of the dominant parts of the economy is found in online gaming. Current multinationals manage and profit from a wide range of online games, catering for the tastes of millions of people around the world. And those familiar with the current online games like World of Warcraft, Everquest et al will not be surprised to see th author predicting the rise of the black economy of in game trading along with it. Gold farmers abound, highly intelligent and orgainsed groups from India, China etc working for big bosses who work them hard and pay them a pittance for accruing in game wealth for sale to wealthier gamers who have more time than money. Some of the novel is scarily relevant right now, with sweatshops for online gaming becoming increasingly common in countries like China. It certainly doesn't take a massive leap of the imagination to believe in the world the author paints. And this new world gives the author scope to talk about, in great detail sometimes, a whole range of issues around economics and exploitation.
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