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For To Next - And Not Or
 
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For To Next - And Not Or

26 Feb 2007 | Format: MP3

11.49 (VAT included if applicable)
Also available in CD Format
Song Title
Time
Popularity  
1
5:38
2
4:50
3
5:21
4
4:30
5
5:08
6
5:52
7
5:24
8
6:27
9
7:06
10
6:11
11
5:37
12
6:26
13
4:32
14
5:54

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Product details

  • Original Release Date: 26 Feb 2007
  • Release Date: 26 Feb 2007
  • Label: Virgin UK
  • Copyright: (C) 2007 Virgin Records Ltd This label copy information is the subject of copyright protection. All rights reserved. (C) 2007 Virgin Records Ltd
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 1:18:56
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B001I1ALEA
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 62,377 in MP3 Albums (See Top 100 in MP3 Albums)

Customer Reviews

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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By DSR VINE VOICE on 29 Feb 2008
Format: Audio CD
1983 and a new pair of Hillage LP's (combined together on one of the longest running CD's in my collection at 80 minutes, give or take a few seconds). I LOVED THEM!!!

Apart from "Fish Rising," the first solo release for Steve Hillage only tolerable for me now due to the superior re-mastering today, I loved all of his 1970's releases, the musicianship and happy, spiritually uplifting vibe being truly infectious. By 1980 the music world had moved on and Steves output was increasingly being regarded as "Hippy Drippy."

OK, there are drum machines on this release, rather than the superbly talented and powerful drummers Steve had in his live band and musicians out there may also date this by the keyboards used, but I personally don't find it dated at all. The songs do show a sadness ("Alone") and cynicism ("Bright Future," "Anthems For The Blind," "Waiting") that wasn't there before, but unlike the previous reviewer, I find them just as relevant today (read Iraq or Afganistan for The Falklands in "Anthems For The Blind") and the overkill situation ("Bright Future") we had with the USSR in '83 could today be with the middle east. My two favourites are "These Uncharted lands" and "Waiting," with a guitar played with a bow. Steve has always cared about humanity and I suspect he was annoyed with the manipulation society still puts up with on a daily basis.

The second record is a purely medidative instrumental, which I still love to bits. "Before The Storm" is a hugely intense track when played LOUDLY, lifting you up until you're held on the ceiling, before fading away, leaving you a quivering wreck. The next track always seemed to me to be asking a question, replied by the following "Serotonin."..
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By izimizam on 16 Dec 2011
Format: Audio CD
without a doubt the most underated album he ever did.Dont get me wrong , most of his albums are classics on some level but this one has a depth he never again hit , its really one of those albums you love or hate.YES on some level is sounds dated but i love the albums sound for that very reason.Something just works about this album .Emotion and song writing skill comes to the fore on this release.Itss some of the best writing i think him and his partner miquette ever did , some of the deepest emotion and a real sense of how music can sum up this crazy world.It feels very much like the views of a man as the 70's dream ends and the 8-'s kicks in , it has some kind of futuristic vibe and soul i never heard on anything else.
I love the album to death.Listen with your heart.
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7 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Robert Hickling on 28 May 2008
Format: Audio CD
i couldnt agree more with dsr review i have never been a huge fan of steve hillages hippy trippy spaced out music but when i first heard this it totally blew me away.great guitar solos over drum and synth beats.another one for turning out the lights turning up the volume unmissable.
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9 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Mr. A. Pomeroy on 4 Nov 2007
Format: Audio CD
Steve Hillage played guitar with British progressive rock group Gong. He had a beard, and left Gong to have a solo career on Virgin records in the mid 1970s, at a time when Virgin records put out a lot of records by bearded guitarists. Hillage was just getting into his stride when punk happened, and he took a break from music in 1979 and shaved off his beard. In 1983 he returned with FOR TO NEXT, which was absolutely different from everything he had done previously.

FOR TO NEXT is a departure akin to Neil Young's "Trans", although if anything it is even more total. It is a synthesiser pop album in what was then a modern electronic style. Electronic drums, twangy Prophet V synthesisers. I surmise that Hillage had bought a ZX Spectrum and was suddenly enthused with technology. FOR TO NEXT is unrecognisable as a Steve Hillage album. The lead singer doesn't even sound like Hillage, his voice is deep and doom-laden in the kind of shouty, chanting style that was popular at the time. A lot of the album sounds like Heaven 17's "Penthouse and Pavement" or John Foxx's "Metamatic". It is impressive that Steve Hillage could pull off such a total sylistic change. The song "Bright Future" is mildly funky. There are guitar solos, but they are nothing out of the ordinary.

Although the album's electronic sound is exactly of its time, the music itself doesn't work. Hillage captures the style of an early-80s synth pop group, but his songwriting must have been going through a slump, because the tunes sound like something Thomas Dolby might have used as the third track on a 12" single. They aren't catchy enough to be pop, or mesmeric enough to be something else.
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